Ep. 013: Sales Rep X

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Sales Rep X:
I mean, you could pay me a $100,000 a year and I'd be ecstatic, but I'm not going to make that. That's not like a big deal to me. I guess it's just come. It's just something that comes with working hard. You get paid more. The harder you work, you get paid more.

Tracy Neal:
My guest for episode number 13 is sales rep X. Yes, you heard that correctly. Sales Rep X is an anonymous sales rep at a US beer distributor who will remain nameless. I'm calling this the first episode of the Millennial series because sales rep X is a 25 year old millennial. So many times in this industry I've heard discussions, challenges and even frustrations from distributor leaders as they try to employ, motivate and understand the millennial mindset. Well, here it is. He's incognito and we've even altered his voice slightly to protect his identity. And if you're a millennial sales rep out there and you're listening, don't let this single voice represent you. Contact me and I'll fly to your hometown to interview you as well. Be part of the millennial series. And listeners, if you agree or disagree with the statements and attitudes of Sales Rep X. Let me know by commenting on our Facebook, Instagram or Twitter accounts you can find me at iSellBeer Nation on each of those social media apps. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did. iSellBeer presents to you, The Millennial Series and Sales Rep X.

I am not Mr. Lebowski. You're Mr Lebowski, I'm the dude.

Yeah, I tell you what, you can take a good look at the pictures asked by sticking your head up there. But wouldn't you rather take his word for it?

Film and eat all the frickin chips. Kip.

A point. Don't be jealous that I've been shown online with games all day.

We have a pawn in the back, a pool and a pot of good.

Welcome to the iSellBeer podcast with Tracy Neal, a production for sales reps and distributors who are driving around all day selling beer and the official home of the iSellBeer Nation Facebook group. And now your host. The 1989 winner of the John M. Studebaker Wheelbarrow Race in Hangtown, California, Tracy Neal!

Tracy Neal:
All right. I'm here with me with Sales Rep X, and we're going to we're going to get a better name than that, right. So what you're what you're a fictitional name. What's the name gonna be?

Sales Rep X:
Well, my fictitious name will be James Kidd.

Tracy Neal:
James Kidd. All right, James,.

Sales Rep X:
You know how I come up with a name like that?

Tracy Neal:
How do you come up with James Kidd?

Sales Rep X:
You take your middle name and your mom's maiden name, and that's her secret agent.

Tracy Neal:
That's your secret agent named James Kidd. All right, James. So the purpose, I think, like I told you before, but the reason we're going on incognito here is we're not trying to disparage anyone or we just want you to be able to talk freely. And, you know, as a sales rep in the industry, I thought it'd be really cool to get somebody on the podcast. It's in the industry at the street level. You talk about what it means to be in this industry, what it means to to have this career and really be able to talk freely about it. So it also creates a little bit of mystique for this particular episode. Right. This is James James. James Kidd or James the kid.

Sales Rep X:
No James Kid. I know. I sound like a guy from the Wild West.

Tracy Neal:
Okay, James. So, James, how long have you been selling beer?

Sales Rep X:
I have been selling beer for almost almost three and a half years now. I want to say.

Tracy Neal:
Three and a half years?

I'm still pretty damn new new to it.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So how old are you?

Sales Rep X:
Twenty five.

Tracy Neal:
Twenty five years old man selling beer for three and a half years. And what do you like best about selling beer?

Sales Rep X:
I like the idea that I sell something that pretty much everyone likes to drink. For the most part, I mean, generally speaking, like, you know, most people like beer, most people like booze. And the people you deal with in that business are more than happy to you know, no one, no one, no one is banging. Larry, like shouting now, like, you know, hey, what's going on, James? You're my dairy guy. Like, you know, Shamrock. Here he comes, like, you know. But sometimes when you go in there and you you go in there as a as a rep for a beer company, you're you know, you go in there and they're like, oh, crap, like beer guys here, like, let's go. Like like, I'm down. Like, what's going on?

Tracy Neal:
So you like being the beer guy?

Sales Rep X:
Yeah, everyone likes beer guy.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. How much? How much are you the beer guy amongst your non-industry friends like you're your friends. Roommates, people you hang out with on the weekend, are you the beer guy?

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. I'm the beer guy and the guy that knows all the context for all the bars.

Tracy Neal:
So you're saying there's some social currency to knowing what's up around town?

Sales Rep X:
Yeah, definitely. You get to know like bar owners, you get to know bar managers and get to know bartenders. I mean, there's been several times I walk into a bar and, you know, I I might get service quicker. The bar might be packed and I'll get sort of the bartender. Man, Hey, what's going on, James? Like, I'm like like a what's going on? What can I get you? Meanwhile, there's, you know, 10 people sitting in front of our waiting for a beer.

Tracy Neal:
By the way, what what is this beer you handing me? And we were having a beer right now.

Sales Rep X:
That is gonna be a new Belgian's newest addition next to their liquid paradise. But this is gonna be the Juicy Haze IPA.

Tracy Neal:
The Juicy Haze IPA.

Sales Rep X:
Fall. And their new craze with the Hazy IPAs.

Tracy Neal:
James brought a couple of six packs over here to the worldwide headquarters of iSellBeer recording. Right. And then there's a with a San. We also have a SanTan here.

Sales Rep X:
Yep, SanTan MoonJuice.

Tracy Neal:
Nice. Okay. So, James, what do you like about selling beer? I'm going to I'm going to repeat the same question. I'm a really emphasize selling because the answer you gave me was really about the what are you you kind of answered. What do you like about being somebody who sells beer? But I'm I'm not necessarily correcting you. I'm just searching for a deeper answer. The selling side of beer, what do you like about actually selling, about going into an account and. Finding an opportunity to find a problem, making a pitch to sell the beer.

Sales Rep X:
I don't know if you could directly like put it towards beer, but I mean, even when I did grocery stores and now that, you know, doing bar sales.

Tracy Neal:
So way back up. You did. You've done off premising in grocery stores?

Sales Rep X:
Yeah, I did that majority of the time. I'm new. Definitely new to on premise. I've been doing it few months now at least.

Tracy Neal:
They sell on premise now for a couple months and a couple two or three years in the Lord large format chain grocery channel. Okay.

Sales Rep X:
So I mean I don't know like looking at it from the perspective in the chain world, even though a lot of managers I mean you go to a grocery store and you talk to the store manager. Sometimes they don't really care. You can talk margins all day. But like an on premise world, it's totally different. But long story short, what I like about selling beer is, you know, I'll go in there and I feel like I'm being the better business person for them. You know, I know.

Tracy Neal:
You mean you're helping them solve a problem?

Sales Rep X:
I'm helping them solve. You know. I look at their whole business as a whole. You know, it might be a bar. It might be a grocery store. But I look at their whole business as a whole. And I look at it and I'm trying to figure out what can I fix? Okay. Beers down or, you know, department ninety five or whatever the chip department is and Wal-Mart is down. It's like you take those problems that you hear or overhear when you're talking to a manager and owner of a bar whose sales are down or whatever and you kind of like utilize the tools that you have as a beer distributor and try to tie them in to solve that problem.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
Does that make sense?

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
You know, I like you're not it's less about selling beer and you're more about how can I make this guy in this guy's business better?

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
You know, like, how can I benefit him in the same return? I'm benefiting myself. So it's less I don't know. It's less about selling beer and just more about just trying to be a good person and try to help him out almost as good an advisor.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Adviser/consultant. Yeah. So you're a consultant?

Sales Rep X:
Yeah, basically.

Tracy Neal:
And you're using beer as your beers. Beers, your crescent wrench?

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. Yeah. It's my my my various amount of tools that I carry around with me in my car.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Now what's what's changed in the three and half years you've been in this industry? I know a lot of times I I interview guys who are lifelong industry guys. And, you know, it's really easy to talk about what's changed in the last 60 years. You've been here for three and a half years. What's really changed in the last three and half years that you've seen?

Sales Rep X:
Oh, I'm going to correct you, Tracy. Okay. So I actually started in the industry five years ago.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
I started before I could even legally drink beer.

Tracy Neal:
You started in the industry before you can legally drink beer. Officially?

Sales Rep X:
Or alcohol. I started when I was it was three months to my 21st birthday.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. And what type of role?

Sales Rep X:
I started literally at the bottom of what position was available in my, in my company.

Tracy Neal:
Would that be fruit fly swatter?

Sales Rep X:
Yeah, basically.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. I've interviewed a fruit fly swatter.

Sales Rep X:
I mean with with with my job where they've in that position. You're definitely swatting some flies some days because there.

Tracy Neal:
Was it repack, were you in the warehouse?

Sales Rep X:
I was in repack. I started as a repack. I was stuck in that repack.

Tracy Neal:
That's awesome because I've interviewed at least three guys, two of them in their 80s who started in repack I think three of them maybe in their 80s, who started in repack. I've interviewed a six year old who started in repack as well.

Sales Rep X:
So a big part. I mean, it's a little part that people forget about, but repack saves a ton of money because there's a lot of good beer out there.

Tracy Neal:
What did you learn in repack that helps you do your job better today?

Sales Rep X:
Determination and hard work pay really pay off.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
You know, you're not doing the nice piece of work. You're not. You're most of the time it's pretty solitary. I mean, you're by yourself or you have one person next to me, you and you're just talking. You know, it's very like not super, super sociable position. But at the end of the day, you're just you're doing you're where you are a piece of something that's a bigger picture. You know, you're a little piece. And it might seem really little when you're in that position. It really does pay off for everyone else. So a lot of companies benefit from having repack.

Tracy Neal:
When you got your first route, I've been told by I get really nice emails from around the country from our listeners who are on routes. And one of them emailed me a couple weeks ago and said, hey, thank you. You really nailed it on the head when you said we join this industry for the camaraderie. But it sure can get lonely on the route. Did you ever identify with that statement where the camaraderie is great at the warehouse, but you're out on the route and. Maybe you're a little bit lonely because the camaraderie is not there on the route.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. I feel that. I mean, I'm maybe I'm going a little far with this, but I. I was never lonely. And I mean, I mean. Yeah. Like, you're talking to people all day. You're a sales rep. So you're you know, your day to day life is going into a store and you're going into Wal-Mart, you're going into whatever Kroger or whatever the store is. That might be you're going into the bar you're doing with the bartender. That's all fine and dandy. I mean, those people don't know what's really going on behind the scenes so much as the people that are that work with you. So how I kept myself from being lonely is I got to know my drivers, but I was in chains. I got to merchandisers.

Tracy Neal:
That's good. Know your drivers. Know your merchandisers.

Sales Rep X:
There, they work for you.

Tracy Neal:
Build a team.

Sales Rep X:
You know, the work, your one unit. You're not just you. It's not just your driver. It's not just your merchandise. It's not just your sales rep. You're working together as a team. I don't know how many times I called my rep or my merch when we're working or I would meet him at a store to help him out. Throw a load. Yeah. And we just bullshit. Have a great time. You know. Hey, you like ones the ones that could do or when are you getting married man. When are you gonna put a ring on that. That girlfriend already, you know.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
And it kind of made it more fun.

Tracy Neal:
And that kind of sets the tone for a relationship where there can be trust. Right. Independents like you can depend on them. So what's it mean when a merchandiser on your team goes the extra mile and helps you out and get something done that you weren't able to do yourself?

Sales Rep X:
I don't know. There's many times where I took him out on my own, my own dime. Like my personal and, you know, I had a great night. I'd take him out, you know, just get to know him better. There is there's so many times that I've I've had drivers that are literally like friends outside of work. Now, you know, I've met I really met their kids. And that's not something that's normal from, you know, someone that's. I'm so new to this hill or beer industry and being a salesman. But I notice that that's not a normal thing that a lot of people have. There's a bit of a disconnect between a sales rep and an operations person. Driver merchandise or what have you.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
But I would just take him out. We'd have drinks. You know, we, you know, have lunch. Like, we just, you know, I don't know. Just like go to a concert to get. There was one time we went to went to a baseball game together with one of my merchandisers. It was like hitting him and his girlfriend and me and my my girlfriend at the time we just had a blast we're just hanging out. Well, you know, I work and he work together. So girlfriends got to know each other.

Tracy Neal:
That's what's good about this industry.

Sales Rep X:
We're co-workers. We're a team. Just because we're on two sides of the of the warehouse. I guess, so to speak.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So how many, I'm going to get to them. The marquee question that I ask a lot of our guests. Do you remember the very first day you had on the job in the beer industry?

Sales Rep X:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
It's a sad one, too.

Tracy Neal:
A sad one, huh? You're smiling, though. You know, you smile. And I say I've asked that question of a lot of people and nobody has not responded with a smile. And that's a double negative. But everybody responds with a smile. Yeah, everybody responds with a smile. When I say tell about the first down the job. I don't know what it is about this industry, but everyone remembers the details of their first day on the job. I know mine pretty well. What what was yours like and why is it sad?

Sales Rep X:
So I guess I have to ask a more specific question. What? Which way of first day?

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Which first day.

Sales Rep X:
It was the first day when I first started it. At my current distributor or was it my first day at my my sales rep position or was it my first day.

Tracy Neal:
I'm gonna go with first day on the sales rep. Because I think the unique I think the sales rep role is the number one role we have listening to the podcast, number one. So talking sales rep terms. But I also think the sales rep one's unique because you're no longer in the walls of the warehouse where you're supervised or watched. You know, the bird flies the nest. Yeah, right. Get in your car and go find your route and we're gonna cross our fingers and hope we see you at the end of the afternoon and we see some activity coming through.

Sales Rep X:
We're hoping that doing something out there.

Tracy Neal:
We're helping the computer starts to make noise here in a few hours.

Sales Rep X:
Just because you work for beer industry doesn't mean you're just out there drinking the product. Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
So tell me your first your first day as a sales rep out on a route with that kind of responsibility to go figure out the route, introduce yourself.

Sales Rep X:
I will say I had a pretty crash course lesson in how to be a sales rep. When I left merchandising, I left merchandising. Some of the biggest accounts that we have in our our territory, which would be like your Total Wine store, right? Know, it's a huge, massive store that pretty much carries almost every product of a distributor in the state.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
And what was it? And. I, they developed the position for me to move up into a sales position by being a sales assistant, so was my first job as being kind of a sales rep.

Tracy Neal:
Sales assistant? Okay.

Sales Rep X:
And basically, long story short, I got put as a sales assistant. I had a week to learn how to be a sales rep for Total Wine and then the rep for that. That route was gone. You went on vacation.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
So I had one week crash course less than that first day. I had no idea what I was doing.

Tracy Neal:
Let's get it. Let's get into that first day. Let's get to that first day. Were you wearing a tie?

Sales Rep X:
No.

Tracy Neal:
No? Okay.

Sales Rep X:
I was wearing my operations, polo. I was wearing dicky pants because I didn't have any dress pants.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
And then I had really nice dress shoes on because I thought that was part of the etiquette of being yourself. Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
You're out of the warehouse. You've got to put on the dress shoes. That's what you've got at least. Right.

Sales Rep X:
That's what I thought.

Tracy Neal:
Did you wear a dress used today, by the way?

Sales Rep X:
At work today? I wear I wear these fancy Timberland boots that I bought. I get a lot of compliments on them.

Tracy Neal:
Nice. They look good.

Sales Rep X:
I love them.

Tracy Neal:
I was just wondering if you kind of went backwards against the dress shoes now that you're....

Sales Rep X:
No.

Tracy Neal:
Grizzled veteran of five years. O

Sales Rep X:
Grizzled veteran of five years now? I don't know. I like I like wearing dress shoes. I I take pride in how I look. And, you know, I.

Tracy Neal:
You're a sharp dresser. I've noticed that about you.

Sales Rep X:
I think if you if you if you dress good and then like, you know, like people know you mean business, if you you have enough decency to take care of yourself, that obviously you're you're you're a person that you're selling to, knows that you're going to take care of them. You show up to work looking like a mess that you just walk up out of bed, you're hung over. You just slammed like a fifth of vodka the night before. And you're just your hair's a mess. You smell like booze. Not saying that anyone is like that, but you even bother putting a shower deodorant on. You know, you might not people and not want to really listen to you. But when you do, if you take care of yourself, people people notice that.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
A lot of the time.

Tracy Neal:
It was this part of the uniform.

Sales Rep X:
I mean, my first day as being a sales rep, I didn't really tell the uniform. I didn't have.

Tracy Neal:
I'm still digging back into that first day. What about the first account?

Sales Rep X:
First account.

Tracy Neal:
Do you remember the first account? I know that the details are right there.

Sales Rep X:
We'll fast. We'll fast forward through the total wine phase. So when I got my first major chain route, my first day, I was thrown off at the fact that I didn't have to be to work till like 7:00.

Tracy Neal:
Because you'd been up earlier on the merchandiser side. So so two years, two to two years of being in your first account at 5:30, 6:00 in the morning.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah, 5:00. I was up at 4:00 a.m. at my house for 4:30 in the club, like up at my house, getting ready to go to work either by 5:00.

Tracy Neal:
And all of a sudden now you've got a chain route you. The check in time is 7:00 a.m., your first account. So you do that to you off a little bit. You thought, hmm.

Sales Rep X:
I got to sleep in for the first time in two years.

Tracy Neal:
And make a little more money doing it, right? Am I correct in that assumption that that step up maybe a little bit more money?

Sales Rep X:
It was a long, hard work to do, so.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
No, I remember trying to think it was a Monday. I showed up. We went to my Kroger store that we had there at 7. I was OK. So I was completely clueless on how our i-Pad worked at this point. I bought dress pants and dress shoes, I already had dress shoes, but I had like an actual polo and I was more uniform looking.

Tracy Neal:
And you didn't know how the iPod worked, huh?

Sales Rep X:
I didn't have it, wasn't I? I've had actually at that date I had today. But back then it was a this weird.

Tracy Neal:
Motorola flip tablet thing?

Sales Rep X:
Yeah, it was like, what? Police officers use the bulletproof laptop that we had. And so I had no idea how to use it because when I was helping out with Total Wines, they didn't use that device. So we didn't know. I didn't know product codes. I didn't know how to work the stars. The system that we use to order, I don't know how to use any of that.

Tracy Neal:
Okay, so let me ask you about technology. I mean, your can we classify you as a millennial?

Sales Rep X:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So you're a millennial. Do you have Instagram account?

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. Just don't use it.

Tracy Neal:
You don't use it? Wow.

Sales Rep X:
I don't really use any social media.

Tracy Neal:
You don't use that much social media. Despite being a millennial. Okay.

Sales Rep X:
Reddit, is probably the closest thing.

Tracy Neal:
Reddit. You're big on Reddit, huh?

Sales Rep X:
It's just entertaining and read stuff.

Tracy Neal:
Well, the question I was gonna ask is if you're going. Let's say hypothetically, you're going to look for a new job tomorrow and you go to the interview. How important are the technology tools that you have to use nowadays?

Sales Rep X:
It's like. Incredibly important.

Tracy Neal:
Incredibly important from. I mean, yes, we're all incredibly dependent on them, but I guess what I'm getting at is I'm just gonna say it. I have a hypothesis that the younger generation will potentially turn down a job if they're issued old tools or if they're issued something that's not user friendly in terms of a user experience. If it does if it's not fun and easy to use and it looks like yesterday's technology, I think it's a major turnoff to the younger applicant.

Sales Rep X:
Like the applicant?

Tracy Neal:
Yeah, the applicant. Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
They're they're gonna turn down that...

Tracy Neal:
And I'll tell you where this hypothesis is coming from. I've heard I've heard a couple of distributor owners say, oh, those damn millennials. You know, I had this one and he went out and you worked for us. And he called in the next day and quit. And my feedback was, you know, I don't think it was because he decided he didn't want to sell beer. I don't think it was because it was just too darn hard of a job. I mean, I kind of knew what he was getting into. I have a hypothesis sometimes I think it's you handed him an old piece of technology with some really old green and white lettered DOS software on it. And it didn't feel very much. It didn't feel fun and it didn't feel like anything that day. It felt like a dinosaur tool that they had to use to do their job. And I think some of the millennials are basically looking at that, saying this is this is a home and live my life every day interacting with this type of interface.

Sales Rep X:
I would I would kind of. I think I would disagree a little bit.

Tracy Neal:
I'm encouraging if that's how you feel. Absolutely.

Sales Rep X:
I'm more on the side of you know, I I was in repack, I was in merchandising. I was on trucks. I did deliveries. I work to major chains. I did on-premise now. I don't think it has to do with technology. I think millennials have a bad. I mean, don't get me wrong, then I don't mean any disrespect, but there are some millennials out there that even want the tools that are given to them. They just don't want to work.

Tracy Neal:
So we always hear about the millennials needing a purpose.

Sales Rep X:
I don't think it's a purpose necessarily.

Tracy Neal:
Do you feel like every day when you go to work, do you feel like you have a purpose? I mean, is there some is there.

Sales Rep X:
I mean. Oh, I should say it drives you. Yeah, I agree with you on that. Okay.

Tracy Neal:
What's what's without revealing the entire mission statement? What's important about the distributorship that you work for that drives your purpose for doing what you do every day?

Sales Rep X:
I mean, I one wholeheartedly believe in the mission statement that we have, you know, think, well, that's really taking pride in your job and being professional and all that stuff.

Tracy Neal:
That's good news for the whole industry, for everybody listening to this. Right. Again, without disclosing who you work for, the fact that, you know, your company's mission statement and you said, if I can call you, I wholeheartedly. My soul and pride yourself in what that mission statement is. So what that tells me is if there is a distributor out there who either doesn't have a very public mission statement or isn't using that mission statement in onboarding orientation or training with new, younger millennials than they might have a blindspot.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Why? Why does the mission statement that your distributor has, why is it so important to you and you say you wholeheartedly believe in it and have pride in it?

Sales Rep X:
I mean, it deters a little bit, but I wholeheartedly believe my mission statement. But I also. And I'm going to quote someone in my life that isn't even related remotely other than someone that drinks a massive amount of one of our local brands.

Tracy Neal:
So they drink a lot of brands, but they're not related the industry.

Sales Rep X:
Not related at all. But he told me something that that I hold very true to me as my as me. And I pass this on to anyone I meet in my industry, merchandiser, driver, bartenders, managers. He literally told me he's like, well, those two things. But he told me he's like, if you call out sick, who's going to do your job?

Tracy Neal:
If you call out sick, who's going to do your job? So he asked you that one time.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. And he was like,.

Tracy Neal:
And his response was what?

Sales Rep X:
He's like. My response was someone's gonna have to do their job and my job. How is that fair?

Tracy Neal:
So fairness is the fair line.

Sales Rep X:
And it goes back to how the mission statement believes in being prideful and being professional. So I 100% believe in the fact of if you want to be a good worker, you want to be a good sales rep. You want to be a good worker at any part outside of beer industry and at all. You need to remember the fact that a lot of tornadoes have this issue. But when you miss work, someone else has to pick your slack. Who what? Like what? You like that idea. Do you like the idea of someone else having to pick your slack because you couldn't make it to work? Because I was sick, you know.

Tracy Neal:
So it's interesting, though, because you're saying this is a real point of pride and it's really important to you. And I could tell, you know, your facial expression like this, it's a big deal. But I think in some ways it also is completely contradictory to some of the complaints about the millennial employee.

Sales Rep X:
Oh, yeah. It is.

Tracy Neal:
Where it's like, you know, we hear from the distributor owners and principals and GM's, the damn millennials, they don't ever want to work and they're unreliable and they don't show up.

Sales Rep X:
I mean, I would I would hope without me, you know, trying to put myself on a pedestal.

Tracy Neal:
Well, yeah, we've got a data point of one here.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. I mean, I'm not trying to put myself out there that I'm the best millennial that was ever out there as a worker. But no, I hear that a lot. I dealt with that a lot. I was I was when I was a chain rep, I was dealing with dry or not. Not most. Not so much drivers, but a lot of merchandisers. And I know Harry and one of your previous podcasts talked about how he was a merchandiser.

Tracy Neal:
Harry Schumacher. Yep.

Sales Rep X:
Like, that's not a great position to be in. But a lot of people that are millennials, they like what that get the best of them. You know, they they they hold that like, you know, all it just it sucks. You know, I just I don't want to be there. I don't want to be at Wal-Mart at 3:00 a.m. or whatever.

Tracy Neal:
So what's what's important to you from a career perspective? Are you you know, you're five years in the industry. Couple, two, three years in this current role. Are you looking at. Do you look at. I'm 47. You look at 47 year old guys like me and other 47, 50 year old guys at your warehouse. And you say again, I'm not putting myself on a pose as you say, that's the career path I want. I want to get to where that guy is. Or are you thinking of this more as like I don't know where I want to go when I want to do with my life. This is my job in 2019.

Sales Rep X:
I think I'm in partial to both. I'm open to the idea of being where that person is, that 50 year old and still in the same industry.

Tracy Neal:
Twenty five years from now?

Sales Rep X:
But I also feel like I'm not sure what I want to do.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
But that doesn't deter me from not doing the best possible job I can do my job. Okay. I'd take absolutely the most amount of pride with my job. I get upset if I screw up or if I'm not there if I can't fix a problem. And it might just be you know, this might just be a temporary thing that may only last another year or five years. Who knows?

Tracy Neal:
And when you're with that type of openness to who knows what comes next, is your is your radar up looking for a particular opportunity that excites you from a passion standpoint, from an economic earnings standpoint, from a geo location like a particular city or your antenna is down and something would really have to slap you in the face that you might wake you up and say, yeah, I might be open to that change.

Sales Rep X:
I don't know. I guess no one's ever really asked a question like that. I don't know. I'm kind of open to kind of whatever. I mean, I just I don't know what's going to happen in 10 years. I mean, if I end up in a different look at there's nothing going to hold me back. I guess I'm always gonna be open to hearing someone else.

Tracy Neal:
What are your aspirations from an income perspective? Are you meeting me as a part B of that question? You're 25 now. Back up to age 20, 21. In this particular industry, with this particular role.Are you making the kind of money that you thought you'd make five years ago when you when you said, I'm going to be 25. And maybe that's not fair, because I think maybe we all know I think I'm gonna make a ton of money in five years. Right. I mean, we all the grass is greener. I think in the account in the future is always larger than it actually is. So that might not be a fair question, but you kind of see that the the direction of what I'm trying to. Yeah, right. As you look at your income and what this industry is afforded you today. Is it like, you know, obviously, I know you'd like more money. I'd like more money. Who wouldn't like more money, right?

Sales Rep X:
Well, I'd like some more money.

Tracy Neal:
But. But is it. Are you at a point where they're like, hey, I'm comfortable and happy and I feel like I'm being fairly compensated for everything I do? Or is it you know what? I'm not there yet. And that's why I work so hard.

Sales Rep X:
I don't know. I'm very I'm an unusual person to ask that because I mean, I know there's people out there that really stress about work. And I like your work, too. You know, you put in 40 hours, you make X amount of money. You do this position. You make this amount of money and you move up and you do this position you make this next money.

Tracy Neal:
That's my generation, I mean, we spend hours and hours in the back of our brains calculating what pay levels we would be in two years.

Sales Rep X:
You'll be at this level. Yes. And you'll make this money.

Tracy Neal:
And it was all directed by title and levels and promotions. And there was a there was the actual scale and then there was the actual trend line. Right. Real life. And then there was the trend line in your head. And it felt like we were. I felt like I was always behind. You know, I didn't make as much money at age 25 as I thought it would. And I didn't make as much money at age 30 as I thought I wouldn't I shouldn't make as much money. Forty, 45 and 46 as I thought I would. I've never made as much money as I thought if I felt like I've always been behind. And maybe that's just my generation.

Sales Rep X:
I don't know. I guess I don't. I mean I started working when I was 16. I've never worried about money because I looked at money and not thought because I'm like, well off. My parents are great parents, but I mean, I bought everything on my own but my own car and everything. But when I got a promotion to be a sales rep for when I got one from repacked merching, I mean, before it worked at the current placem I'm at, I was a Circle K representative, I work at a gas station.

Tracy Neal:
I worked at the gas station, too. Yeah. So, I'm gonna tell you, you got great things ahead of you.

Sales Rep X:
So me it to me being being someone in the industry and looking at pay, I don't look and I don't I don't have that attitude. I'm 25. I didn't think I'd make this much money or time enough. I look at how I look at the picture. I look back at when I was 16 and I was making $7 an hour, which I know is crazy not to make you feel old, Tracy.

Tracy Neal:
I was I was at three thirty.

Sales Rep X:
But I will look back then and I remember I think back and I think back when I was sixteen and I made $7 an hour and I thought that was the craziest, coolest thing ever that I made $7 an hour.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
You know, now.

Tracy Neal:
Did you ride the wave of the minimum wage.

Sales Rep X:
No, i did not.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. There's a certain age group out there.

Sales Rep X:
I remember when I got my first raise after three years of working, I worked for minimum wage for three years.

Tracy Neal:
But, you know, there's a certain age out there that I didn't deserve or didn't earn their way to the $3 price hike. When the minimum minimum wage laws changed. They've changed again. They've changed again. Right. I mean, you've got this one age group of very unfortunately, we're not teaching them life lessons on how to get raises because they think the government just does it with all these.

Sales Rep X:
They just the government gives them the raises. That's not. No, that's not how it works. But no. Back to your question, though. Like, I don't know. I've never worried about money. I always look at when I get, you know, I buy hit a big incentive. I get a bonus or, you know, what have you or I get a annual price raise or whatever. That stuff doesn't really bother me. I just I always think back to where it was five years ago, four years ago.

Tracy Neal:
And you feel like you're making progress in the upward direction. That's good.

Sales Rep X:
I think I think it's cool that I can look back and see where I started and look at where it was. And in my mind, all I look and see in front of me, you know, when I'm 30, you know how I might may be making the same money, but I still look at it as I was better than I was when I was 19. Yeah. You know, like I mean, I know I'll make more money when I get up to, you know, in five years. Obviously, it's going to happen. I mean, it's, you know, just by help be calling me and work and stuff. But I don't I don't really worry too much about that. I did. I mean, you could pay me a hundred thousand dollars a year, and I'd be ecstatic. But I'm not going to make that. That's not like a big deal to me. I guess it's just. Come on. It's just something that comes with working hard. You get paid more after you work. You get paid more.

Tracy Neal:
It's interesting to realize how much energy I've wasted trying to worry about how much money I'd make over the last 20 years. I'd rather I've spent I've spent a lot of brain energy on this. I don't know if it's the way I was brought up or the generation I am or the era, whatever. But I've I can tell you, I've spent a lot of brain energy on it. I spent my, probably spent a lot of brain energy on it this year more than I should. And it's just interesting to speak with someone like you who hasn't and realized that maybe, maybe I'm the weirdo here. Right. Maybe I'm maybe I shouldn't do that.

Sales Rep X:
Well, I mean, you you rewind yourself. What? What was Tracy doing when he was 25? How much money did Tracy at the age of twenty five?

Tracy Neal:
At the age of 25? I was making $22,000 a year.

Sales Rep X:
You look at yourself now.

Tracy Neal:
And I was I was not happy about it because the average.

Sales Rep X:
But that that's what drove you to work hard.

Tracy Neal:
The average college kid.

Sales Rep X:
You that it was going to happen eventually.

Tracy Neal:
Fizzes said, the average college job at my college was 23-5. And I was at 22. And I was not happy that I was $1,500 below the average. But yeah. Anyway, I mean.

Sales Rep X:
You were happy, though.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. It was like.

Sales Rep X:
You look at yourself now. 47, right?

Tracy Neal:
Yep.

Sales Rep X:
Forty seven years old. You make X amount of money. Obviously it's gonna be more than what you made at 25. You don't feel good about yourself?

Tracy Neal:
So I can say I'm proud that there's a upward arrow to the right increase. Yes. Speaking of money. And there's all these. I think one of things that's really fascinating in the industry today is incentives. And let me clasify how incentives used to work.

Sales Rep X:
Okay.

Tracy Neal:
Incentives used to work with, hey sales rep. We'd like you to do this behavior, whether it's get a tap handle, get a display, you get a placement. So here's how much you make if you get it. And it was kind of the carrot model. Right. Like, here's a carrot jump and get the carrot. And I've been in meetings with suppliers and distributors where if we needed 2% growth, we'd give $100. And if we needed 4$ growth, we'd give $300. If we needed 7% growth. We'd give a $1,000. In other words, we decorated the carrot to be prettier and prettier and prettier to get more popcorn.

Sales Rep X:
You needed a higher goal.

Tracy Neal:
And what I'm seeing in today's market and the feedback, I mean, from the distributors in our network across the country is sometimes the carrot. It's the wrong vegetable. It doesn't even work. Sometimes the goal of having whether you call PFP or MBOs, but an incentive of here's a pretty carrot jumping, get it. So we can change your behavior is not necessary. You know, there's a why purpose there. Like, why and how does it fall into the mission statement and how does it satisfy me? How do you feel again? Our Millennial Petri dish with a data point of one year on behalf of all millennials in the United States? Yeah. How do you feel about incentives in regards to what makes James Kidd jump?

Sales Rep X:
When I'm a big person, when it comes to and I'm partial, I mean, I'm a human being. I have my own opinion, right?

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
Money doesn't drive everything that I do.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
But when a supplier goes on stage and he shows something that is that is awesome, you know, it's something that I think I can really so.

Tracy Neal:
Awesome in a product you're talking about.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. So if Tracy went onstage and you're like, I have iSellBeer and maybe there's 10 people sitting.

Tracy Neal:
And somebody asked me, by the way, that they asked us if we were going to create cans of iSellBeer.

Sales Rep X:
Okay. Cans of iSellBeer.

Tracy Neal:
I don't think so. Not right now.

Sales Rep X:
That would be interesting.

Tracy Neal:
It was interesting that.

Sales Rep X:
You had to pick a beer to put in the can. What beer would you pick?

Tracy Neal:
Oh boy, I'd get in so much trouble if I said which brand does it have 100,000 brands of.

Sales Rep X:
No, no. Don't pick up beer or pick a style.

Tracy Neal:
Style? I don't know.

Sales Rep X:
I don't know. You picked up the Galactic Grapefruit.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. The Galactic Grapefruit IPA here. So maybe that's it. I don't know. So again, going back to the incentives, you're saying that from a logic standpoint, what we're asking you to has to make sense. You have to believe in the logic of why somebody needs to buy this.

Sales Rep X:
But if you're standing on stage like not everyone is going to like.

Tracy Neal:
So what if the product's really great, but the person on stage. What if I'm the supplier rep and I'm just not a good presenter? I.

Sales Rep X:
I ignore this the presenter half the time.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So you're you're you're you're evaluating the story, the logic of how it satisfies a need for your customers, whether the presenter is a first class supplier, presenter, or whether they're maybe not so good.

Sales Rep X:
He could be a guy that's just graduated with his bachelors in public speaking.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
You don't like it presented to me. I mean, it's great if they're great. It's it's bad if they're bad. I mean, that doesn't apply to me. But if they're on stage and they supply you with like cold, hard facts, they have a great selling hard facts. You know, they got a facts, they got a story, they got passion. They got they bring to the table what you would yourself as a sales representative brings to the table.

Tracy Neal:
Interesting. Now, I'm not going to ask you about a particular new product because again, you you're doing your job every day. Will make sure you go back a new job tomorrow. But I will tell you, I saw a new product the other day that I thought was awesome. I mean, the way they presented it. The logic behind it was the Heineken 0.0. And I saw that beer marketers or Beer Business Daily's summit in San Diego with Harry Schumacher. And I just thought the logic behind that makes summit set so much sense. It's just how to get 0.0 makes sense to me. And I thought it was really well, well done.

Sales Rep X:
I mean, do you want me my perspective on zero point zero?

Tracy Neal:
No. I want you to just say it's great to keep your sales rep job to.

Sales Rep X:
No, no. I mean, it's it's kind of like a you turn you turn in a story, I guess. Yeah. I remember when they presented the zero point zero. And I remember sitting in my seat and listening to the Heineken person talk about it. And I thought it was just kind of. No offense. Thought I was dumb as shit. I was like, who the fuck is going to drink is zero point zero in a bar, you know? You know, I was looking I had.

Tracy Neal:
So you had your on premise lens on.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. So I had an on premise lens on even if I had to change print. I feel like change would be harder. But on premise lens I remember there sitting onstage and I'm just like. Are you fucking shitting me.

Tracy Neal:
Really.

Sales Rep X:
Zero point zero. Zero. How the fuck am I gonna sell this to Nancy and Dan over it at Sports Saloon? You know, that sells Coors Light and Miller Lite and would die like that's all they sell, you know? And I was looking at it with such a tunnel vision scope. And I didn't really realize that, you know, Heineken as a company was very passionate about it. They were really, really excited to bring it to our market. Yeah. And I remember I walked away from that meeting the next day and I realized I was like, I don't need to sell it. So Nancy and Dan, over at the Sports Saloon, I have golf courses. I have I have burger shops, I have lunch places that sell beer. I started realizing I was like, there's more know I need to stop looking at it with such like a like a closed mindset, you know, because they were excited about it. I should have been excited about it. But I. And that's that's a first for me. I'm usually pretty open to everything that appears to me. That was definitely the first time that a non alcoholic was presented to me. And I mean, fast forward to a day like I've had great success in my golf course. I've had great success in my lunch places with lots.

Tracy Neal:
That's awesome that you're admitting that you didn't see it. And now you do. And I'm as you as you're talking about, I'm thinking to myself, you know, it makes a ton of sense to me. I like it. But again, I'm I'm 47, so. And I don't want to fuck. Yeah. I'm trying to think back at age 25. Would I have thought that a presentation on a non a beer without alcohol would have made any sense or had any priority.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. Yeah. You have all dive bars in. Only a handful of other.

Tracy Neal:
Specially if I'm on premise. I think at age 25 it probably not would not have made sense. But I think I think one things I want to say is I think they presented the story really well.

Sales Rep X:
Oh yeah. It was a great personal story.

Tracy Neal:
Great. There's a lot of logic in that story.

Sales Rep X:
I mean, my point is, I guess, like, you know, don't just don't sell the story short. If the product doesn't sound the greatest.

Tracy Neal:
One, I think I agree with that. But I also think what you've identified is a little bit of the maturity aspect of being a sales rep, because I think at age 21, when I sold beer at age 21 and 22, I sold the heck out of only the beers I was passionate about. But guess which beers I was passionate about. All of them. All of them. Right. I was not I was not particular. If it came in a bottle, the keg or a can or a cup was all right. And I think one of the things that I've I've learned as I matured over the years, too, is that I don't necessarily have to love the product to love selling it. And I don't necessarily have to love the retail establishment for my personal experience to love selling it to them and solving their problem.

Sales Rep X:
I sell on that same basis now, like as I got better. I mean, obviously, it's been almost three, four years. But, you know, I 100% agree with you. I've had and there's numerous products that I sell that I've never drink outside of sampling. You know, it's just not the drink for me. You know, I don't I don't want to drink it, you know, but I can I can realize that my opinion is not everyone's opinion.

Tracy Neal:
I've got a good friend who used to work with me at Coors and he's like the he's the chief marketing officer for Mary Kay Cosmetics. I can assure you. He wears no makeup, but he loves his job. It's great money and he does a lot of cool cutting edge stuff. And, you know, that's one thing.

Sales Rep X:
But he realizes that it's not for him.

Tracy Neal:
Exactly. Exactly. He's he's applying rather than applying a reflective mirror. In doing your job every day, you apply the skills that you've learned how to solve business problems and get business results that satisfy you intrinsically.

Sales Rep X:
I think I think I mean, what's your point like? If you could be you could be a bigger rep. You could be a Mary Kay rep. You could be. You could be a straight guy that has 10 girlfriends that don't know each other and be a Mary Kay rep. If you take out the factor of what you're selling and I mean. Yes, you're selling beer. Yes, you're selling Mary Kay, but you take the passion that you have as a sales rep and you really, really sell your product. For example, people eat that stuff up and it's not like you're bullshitting. It's just that you are passionate about your product. But you might not use it. Yeah, but you could also notice that it's a good product and it goes back to the 0.0. Yeah, I don't drink non alcoholics. I've tried it. It tastes pretty good for a non-alcoholic, but I don't really know. I don't know.

Tracy Neal:
It doesn't fit in your portfolio. It doesn't fit doesn't fit your lifestyle or your occasions. Right. By the way, I'm not going to rewind. But I am going to point out that I heard you say something about having 10 girlfriends and who just leave it at that. I don't know. I just I don't know where that came from. But I'm going to I'm going to tell you, I did hear it.

Sales Rep X:
Okay. But I mean, I'm dry on a here, so maybe that's.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Another thing I want to talk you about, suppliers.

Sales Rep X:
Okay.

Tracy Neal:
We have a lot of sales reps at listeners pockets. I've had a few suppliers that have discovered it recently. And one of the suppliers want the most is to get in the heart of the sales rep. I mean, we used to call it, you know, share of mind. So share of mine when I was a supplier was spend time with the sales reps so that you have share of minds that when they're out there without you, they're thinking of me and my brands and what I've done for you. So from your perspective, again, on behalf of all millennials data, point of one, what's what are some of the things and I don't know, they what you mentioned suppliers by name or by brand, but what are some of the things that the suppliers have done that have stuck out in your mind? You said, you know what, that's really made a difference with it made a difference in your heart or with it made a difference in your success of your job or whether it made a difference just based on their effort. What what are some things that some suppliers have done? And I'm asking this so that if suppliers listen, they know a little bit more how to approach a millennial sales rep in this industry.

Sales Rep X:
I think the best suppliers and I mean, I'm impartial because I work with, you know, a dozen and a half of them. But I think the best suppliers are the ones that used to be sales reps.

Tracy Neal:
The best suppliers, the ones that used to be sales reps at distributorships.

Sales Rep X:
Because they understand how much like things and ideas that are going on. You know, you as Tracy, you are the distributor sales rep. I work for MillerCoors, Budweiser, whoever. You know, maybe I've never been in your position. So I don't know that you have all these other brands that do take care of. You know, I you don't just focus on another cause. You don't just focus on Budweiser. You focus on all of these brands. And I think the supplier reps that make the best supplier reps are the ones that understand that the supply that the sales rep doesn't just have them as much as they like. You know, a sales rep will do their best to focus on a distributor sales rep will do the best to focus on that supplier. But I mean, they got I mean, to my point of my. The guy that hired me, you're juggling chainsaws. You know, you have you have all these different suppliers here trying to micromanage and make sure that everyone has the same piece of the pie.

Tracy Neal:
So to put that all in the one word, I'm going to say empathy. Right. You want suppliers that have empathy and you want like real empathy. Right. Like you've been there, done that, walked a mile in my shoes. Right. Those are the ones that get your attention. And those are the ones that you go the extra mile for.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. Especially the ones that understand the empathy of like what I have to do on a day to day as a sales are up for a distributor and also try to help. And I don't mean help in the sense of calling me and be like, hey, you know, I found a great lead.

Tracy Neal:
You know, I sold 16.

Sales Rep X:
Hey, hey.

Tracy Neal:
Be sure to follow up and place all the orders.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. Exactly. Like, you know, that's great. And all like, that's cool. Like, thank you. But, you know, I almost prefer if someone is there just with me, like sampling, talking.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
I think a lot of suppliers.

Tracy Neal:
Spend a little time with you.

Sales Rep X:
I mean, in the short amount of time I've been on purpose rep, I don't want to speak for all suppliers, but the short amount of been with. Players as an on premise rep, the best times that I've had with a supplier is when the supplier is actually with me versus just over the phone or over email. When the supplier is actually there with me and he wants to sell his product, I love that because half the time my buying buyers of my accounts owners and my accounts to them, they just want to be talked to. They want to have that product in their hand. So you you, Tracy, come to the table with your knowledge of this of being a supplier? My knowledge of being a distributor. My knowledge of their history. You know, we sit down and we bring up their beer.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
You know, I'll focus on that suppliers beer that that time that they're with me. But it's like it's like a double team effort rather than just you go into an account like, hey, I got this, lead it. You know, Joe Schmoes Barbecue, you know, it's like, oh, great, dude, like, I'll get to it when I get to it. But you want to come out with me. You want to hit a couple like key accounts that you need to hit that I go to that day and I'll be there at 10:00. I'll see you there. And you go in with me. We come up with a game plan, just like being a rep. You come up with the pre-plan, you come up with a game plan. You go in there, you hammer.

Tracy Neal:
It's a partnership.

Sales Rep X:
You're there as a partner. Not someone is just like, hey, you know.

Tracy Neal:
Let's say a supplier has $10,000 to do an incentive. And again, I'm trying to go back to the behavioral motivation of millennials. Would you prefer or I'm gonna ask you to make the decision on behalf of your sales team that way we we kind of mitigate your own bias as an individual. You're making the decision for the whole sales team now. Right. I'm a supplier. I've got $10,000. You know what? You've got a big sales team. I'm going to have $20,000. Twenty thousand dollars to do an incentive. Would you prefer that we do an incentive where there's a trip involved like we all go somewhere cool? I don't know if we all go to Nashville or Miami or Vegas or something like that. We do this big group trip over a weekend around some event. Maybe it's the Kentucky Derby or the Super Bowl in Vegas. That's that's option A. Right. Option B is staggered levels of cash that you can earn for your performance and $50 for this and $100 for this to enlarge this, $500 this. And there's a $20,000 limit. So when it's all learned, we're done. Or would you rather have one of those shopping sprees, whereas a supplier I bring in all kinds of awesome electronics and refrigerator beer, refrigerators and a massage chair and all kinds of stuff into the sales room and you earn points and raffles and we get to give away merchandise. What's what's getting you get not just you, but you're making a decision on behalf of your sales organization today. What do you think they'd be most excited about? What would help me achieve my plus 10% goal for the month if I had to spend that $20,000?

Sales Rep X:
It depends what division you're talking to.

Tracy Neal:
So and by division, are you talking about large format grocery versus C store versus independent versus on premise? Okay. Because you think they have different then they might have it differently by the trade channel.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Interesting. Well let's go through all four. We've got the time. Right.

Sales Rep X:
Okay.

Tracy Neal:
Large format grocery.

Sales Rep X:
Most of the guys that have been around have been around a long time. They have families. They're married young kids or they have older kids. Those guys are going to want money because they're looking towards retirement. I mean, I'm speaking as a blanket statement. Most chain reps or major large format are usually the veterans of sales reps.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
You know, they want to have money because they're looking to retire or they want to do a vacation that they want to do with their wife or with their kids or whatever.

Tracy Neal:
Yep.

Sales Rep X:
Rewarding them with a trip isn't going to do anything. They can't bring their wife, their kids.

Tracy Neal:
And they may have already been to Vegas 30 times.

Sales Rep X:
So yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So large format grocery. Let's go to on premise for the on premise guys want?

Sales Rep X:
I want to say like blanket speaking, it's gonna be a trip.

Tracy Neal:
The on premise guys want to go somewhere.

Sales Rep X:
Personally, I love money. You know, throw money at me. I love chasing the goal.

Tracy Neal:
The majority of your team would prefer to bond over a weekend and a special event in a trip.

Sales Rep X:
Because the difference between a large format rep and an on premise rep is an on premise rep is really, really driving home. And I don't mean any disrespect to being a chain rep. I was a chain rep, but an on premise rep is driving home a brand, right. You. You have MillerCoors. You got HUSA. You got Constellation. You're driving home that brand. So the best thing that a supplier can do for you in the on premise world is show them or show you as a distributor what their brand is all about.

Tracy Neal:
Experiential and investment in the brand.

Sales Rep X:
Versus like major chain reps. They've already been there. They've done that.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
You know, even the ones that are newer, they're you know, they're not really they're they're they're selling, but they're more or less selling, you know. I would. It's tough to say. I feel like a major chain rep is based on relationships.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
And promise and trust and hard work versus an on premise rep is based on knowledge of the loves of product and relationships. So it's like a little bit two different sales channels. So someone an on premise would prefer a trip because they get to know the brand better. Someone had major chains would prefer the money because they've already been there that long.

Tracy Neal:
I had to agree the way to put it. I like your. I like your answer there. How about. I'm going to put C-store and independent dealer. Broad market. What would they be interested in if you were making a decision for 25 fellow sales reps?

Tracy Neal:
I mean, that's the only division I haven't been in. And don't do a big yawn. I can't hear your microphone. Lean forward.

Sales Rep X:
Oh, sorry.

Tracy Neal:
James is putting his hands behind his head, leaning back, having a big yawn, 40 inches from his microphone right now. Now you're good. You're good. He's taking a millennial snooze as well.

Sales Rep X:
I need another beer, millennial beer.

Tracy Neal:
The beers were miked up. We've got a six foot tether here and the beer seven feet away. So, yeah, we'll finish up here in the next 5, 10 minutes.

Sales Rep X:
What is it? I think first, C-stores. A lot of six or reps or independent reps are going to be they're gonna be the ones that are newest to the company. So they're gonna be the ones that they're introduction to like they're introduced to being a sales rep. So they don't quite understand. They don't like they're they're looking at everything is new and brilliant. So they're looking at it as, you know, maybe a trip would be really fun. Because they're so new to it, like most of the time, at least in our distributor that I'm at.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
Independent reps are treated as it's kind of like a mix match of chain and on premise.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
There's gonna introductory sale. So I would give those guys probably a trip because it gets them really in there. They get excited about it. They're stoked. Daily compromise would be maybe doing like mix and match that we'd like another instead of maybe flip flop it to money time and then do a trip.

Tracy Neal:
What are some of the. You know, I'm fascinated by incentives. They spend a lot of time really study incentives. And I've done a lot in my day. I've done some really good ones. I've done some really bad ones. How important is it to you when an incentives launch that you have tools to be successful? Because I know in the past I've I've made the mistake of not giving sales reps tools to be successful, but making the pot sweeter because it's easier it's easier to read and say you're going to eat a thousand dollars for achieving this goal. And here's all the tools to do it. You say, by the way, I didn't have time to do any tools, but you get two thousand dollars. So you're saying like tools, sell sheets, fact, be selling things that logically help you get the story across the need across town. How important are those tools?

Sales Rep X:
So you're saying like here's two thousand dollars to fix a car without a wrench, you know?

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
You're not giving them that that required tool or tools that they would need. Personally speaking on my opinion as a rep, I would much rather have the tools to sell your product, especially if you're passionate about it.

Tracy Neal:
And more money. Then more money. You'd rather have the tools than more money.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. Because money will come in time. And that's how I always do it.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
You really want to drive a sale home on a product that your company or yourself is passionate about?

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
Your money's better off focused on tools and selling stories and passion than it is waving a 10 bound carrot in front of my face instead of a 20 pound carrot. Yeah, okay. I think tools make a big, big part in a set like a sales story with being a sales rep. Tools are everything.

Tracy Neal:
That's great to hear.

Sales Rep X:
The more information, the better.

Tracy Neal:
Awesome. You know what? Before we turn on the microphones, you were telling me how much you like the Harry Schumacher episode.

Sales Rep X:
I don't think I'm as drunk as it was.

Tracy Neal:
But you said use it. I'd like to have a beer with that guy, huh? What would you like about Harry's episode?

Sales Rep X:
He's very real.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah, very. You could tell that he was very, very passionate.

Tracy Neal:
He's a passionate guy. Yeah, well, so we're very. Here. He's going to listen to this, by the way.

Sales Rep X:
Okay. Hello Harry.

Tracy Neal:
What do you want to say to Harry? Do you know what he does? Do you get. Big Business Daily.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. Our distributor sends it to us.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X:
So you see it? I see.

Tracy Neal:
Don't name the distributor because I'm sure they're only paying for one copy and they send it out six times.

Sales Rep X:
Probably.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Okay. So what you want to say to Harry now that you're familiar with his his work? Any staff, by the way, I should also say that here he's not a one man shop. He's always. Oh, yeah. He's always very generous. You have a ton of...

Sales Rep X:
Oh, yeah. I was in a cool podcast.

Tracy Neal:
Credit to his staff and everything that they do. So would you wanna say to the team over there. Schumacher Publishing.

Sales Rep X:
I mean, I'm going to be the Harry that I'm going to be the first person to say I'm really bad about reading you Beer Business Dailys. But your podcast was hilarious. I wish you almost did a Beer Business Daily podcast.

Tracy Neal:
I talked them about doing a Beer Business Daily podcast.

Sales Rep X:
I would totally listen to that.

Tracy Neal:
You would listen to that? I talked him about it.

Sales Rep X:
I think it I think.

Tracy Neal:
I'd love to do it too.

Sales Rep X:
His personality. And I told.

Tracy Neal:
Him to record it?

Sales Rep X:
If he could be on it, that would be awesome. Like I think I was telling you about it. He when he told what he said, how old he was in your podcast. I was thrown off. I was like, the guy sounds like he's like 30 years old. Does that sound like he's old at all? Like.

Tracy Neal:
You think he sounds 30?

Sales Rep X:
Oh, yeah. He sounded like I have no idea what this guy looks like. I still don't.

Tracy Neal:
You don't know what he looks like?

Sales Rep X:
No, not a clue. Oh, all I know is his Twitter, Twitter thing.

Tracy Neal:
I want to be very nice. He looks. He looks 31. Let me just say that he looks 31.

Sales Rep X:
Okay.

Tracy Neal:
Oh, Harry, Harry, Harry, Harry. Yeah, yeah. I'm gonna have to introduce Harry to James.

Sales Rep X:
Okay.

Tracy Neal:
You'll have fun having a beer with Harry.

Sales Rep X:
No, I loved his podcast. I thought or with you. He was just very real. It I think. I mean, I know. I know. There. I listened to you know, I asked opinions of some of my other friends and co-workers. Some people were like guys. You know, he's he's been a little give it a little too much fun there. But I honestly thought that he was being very realistic. He was honest.

Tracy Neal:
He had great stories. Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. Like. And I like the fact that he he felt like he was at a disadvantage, even though at first he thought he had it made with how his dad was. Yeah. His dad owned a distributor, right.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. He's done a distributor. Yeah. So he thought he was gonna be rich.

Sales Rep X:
He thought he was gonna be rich.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
And he kind of had his world rocked and he had a start from the bottom. I thought that was kind of cool. I mean I wasn't. I mean I would never I've never had that issue in my life before. But it was cool to see someone kind of like have to build themselves up and then see how much he succeeded since then. But I think it was cool. And he worked very hard for what he did. And he has a awesome team that does it too.

Tracy Neal:
He has a great team. Really good team.

Sales Rep X:
I mean, he was very passionate about saying thank you to everyone. He was naming off like 10 plus people.

Tracy Neal:
He's very good at recognizing his his team and they do a great job for him.

Sales Rep X:
That goes a long ways. I know that's on another whole topic, but.

Tracy Neal:
It's not another topic. It's right. It's right there with recognition. You know, Ricky, there's all these H.R. studies about what drives people whether your millennial or not in you know, the lazy answer's always money. Money drives us all. But the real answers are usually autonomy and recognition and purpose and recognition. What are some of the ways I I know your distributor does a really good job of recognition again without adding where you work. What are some of the ways that they they recognize you that makes you feel good about yourself or with the ways that you've seen them recognize other people in your organization?

Sales Rep X:
They do a couple programs where they like recognized people at like a quarterly basis on a yearly basis, which I think is pretty cool. I mean, personally, I find I find an email that's personal more have more an impact on me than having my name on a board.

Tracy Neal:
You would rather have a personal email than your name up on the board?

Sales Rep X:
And I'm not criticizing what my company does by any means. I think is great.

Tracy Neal:
It's you personally.

Sales Rep X:
Me personally, I don't need the glory at all. I think I mean, at the end of the day, when my bosses. You did a nice job today James.

Tracy Neal:
Nice job James.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. You know, you did a good job. You tried your hardest today. Yeah. We didn't get all the sales. You know, you kick your ass. You know, you you put it into gear.

Tracy Neal:
That's good.

Sales Rep X:
You know, that's that's something that really, really like makes me feel good about myself. You know, I did a good job. You know, and I know there's other people out there that like having their name on the board. And that's those people.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah, I'm I'm a name on the board guy.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
A little private pat on the back from somebody doesn't go fat with me

Sales Rep X:
To me that's a big deal.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
So it's like obviously maybe it's a generational thing.

Tracy Neal:
We're all a little different. Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
But no my my company does an excellent job at that. But I've had I've had more personal thank yous. I've never been recognized, by the way. But.

Tracy Neal:
Does that bother you, by the way, do you think you should have been recognized?

Sales Rep X:
Sometimes. But in the same regards, I still I mean, I can smile now about it. I've had so many thank yous from so many different higher ups. And I mean, who knows? They were serious or not? Not from my company, but from Kroger stores. I've had higher ups from Wal-Mart corporate from bout from back east.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X:
And just say thank you. Thank you for caring about our business.

Tracy Neal:
That's good.

Sales Rep X:
My name won't be on the board for that. Yeah, but just you could tell that someone was just wholeheartedly saying thanks. You know what you did and your passion. I appreciate that. And that remisces, it remisces more than my name o the board. Oh, see, I'm not I don't really care if my name is on a board or not because I know at the end of the day that I try my hardest every day. And I don't care if anyone recognizes it except for maybe the one person that does don't doesn't need to be plastered around. But there's nothing wrong with that. I guess there's some people out there that love that.

Tracy Neal:
Not that there's anything wrong with that.

Sales Rep X:
No, not at all.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Awesome. Well, James, I'm on it. I'm going to hand it to you from me. I mean, we're kind of wrapping up here. We had a great hour. By the way, thank you for sharing so much.

Sales Rep X:
It's crazy an hour went by.

Tracy Neal:
An hour went by. Yeah. You know, again, we've got we've got a bunch of sales reps out there. Right. Their sales reps in nearly 40 states are using the iSellBeer platform and listening to this podcast. You know, you're at a sales meeting right now and you've got the podium with five, six, seven, eight thousand sales reps out there. What do you want to say to your your brethren out there? You know, men and women that are out there selling beer. You know, we like to say this podcast with people out there driving around all day selling beer. So you got you got the platform where you want to say to him.

Sales Rep X:
Well, I apologize because I'm 25 years old and.

Tracy Neal:
You apologized for being 25.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah, because I know that there's reps out there that are far more experienced than I am that have been doing this way longer. And I've learned a great amount of information from those sales reps. I've learned a lot of things. I've been I've had to have my temper cooled bad, cooled down by those reps. You know, I have a lot of respect for the guys that have been around a long time. So, you know, bear with me.

Tracy Neal:
Grace and patients. Is that what you're asking for?

Sales Rep X:
Well, no. I mean, I just don't offend any of the seniors.

Tracy Neal:
Oh, before you make your big your big speech.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. Was just, you know, I don't want to hurt the feelings or anything. You know, I, you know, bust a few of their balls for being not know how to work on iPad.

Tracy Neal:
But for not knowing how to work on iPad.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. There's a few of them that are better out like 20 years that have, you know, clue what an iPad is.

Tracy Neal:
Could you start to learn to use the iPad.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Just a little bit.

Sales Rep X:
You know, I mean it's it's a great job being a spirit beer sales rep. I go home and I think back to those days when I'm standing behind a Circle K counter dealing with some total nut job of a lady that's buying a thing a pop off at 6:00 a.m. when the legal drinking age is in my state. Legal drinking time. And it's a great job. And I am like 100% happy that I have this job. And I mean, shit, there's there's some there's some shady days out there. I will say that. There's some days that I just I just can't stand going into the cooler for 30 minutes or 45 minutes. My merchandisers didn't rotate, my drivers didn't rotate my fuck. My bartenders are just the worst that rotating when there's like seven bottles that are one day and then they put all the new ones on top. I mean it sucks sometimes, but the end of the day I just think back to I was standing behind a Circle K counter dealing with this, you know, lady that's just that alcoholic that, you know, I was I was doing that drop and I just hated it. And now I'm a beer rep and I'm just like, this is awesome. I have no there's no boss above me. Yeah. He blows my phone up all the time, which is, you know, I have to put that on ignore sometimes.

Tracy Neal:
It's interesting. You said there's no boss. There's lots of bosses above.

Sales Rep X:
Oh there's tons of. Oh yeah. No I mean I've run around with my head chopped off several times.

Tracy Neal:
You mean with no boss overlooking your shoulder and.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Speaks to the autonomy. Right. Autonomy is a big deal in the job.

Sales Rep X:
I mean I mean to my point anyways is is it's a better job. Definitely. I'm very prideful of that job. Very much so. I think it's a lot of fun. I think it's fun to be a consultant. I think it's fun to be a partner with my account. Not so much a sales rep. I guess that's less about selling beer and it's more about Tracy. You have a company. What can I do to benefit your company? What do I, James can bring to the table, not just my beer distributor. What do I bring my personality? What do I bring to the table that can better your business?

Tracy Neal:
By the way, I love the fact that we both fully adopted your fake name.

Sales Rep X:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
James Kidd.

Sales Rep X:
I've had to put a lot of mental. I'm like three, four beers deep now and I'm had to put a lot of process.

Tracy Neal:
We haven't set it up yet. But it might be Instagram @ James Kidd. Twitter @ James Kidd.

Sales Rep X:
I have a new one going.

Tracy Neal:
Please don't social media.

Sales Rep X:
My secret agent.

Tracy Neal:
Please don't social media, James Kidd, because it doesn't exist. If it does, it's some guy who's actually named James Kidd.

Sales Rep X:
Some guy in like backwoods.

Tracy Neal:
Don't say don't say a state. Don't we have listeners in every state? That's right. We love Tennessee. Sorry. Tennessee. We love you. See that we politically correct on all 50 states.

Sales Rep X:
I'm from back east Tennessee. I'm sorry.

We love everybody anyway. James, I can say this has been an awesome hour. Thank you for giving us a window into your career, but to some degree your soul. I can tell you. You say this is a great job. I'm excited to tell you this is a great industry and it's a great career. And it's it's not just great because we get to drink beer while we do interviews, but it's just it's just full of good people who are not. I will tell you, we're not all perfect. We we all we all have some issues. And we're all working to be better people, but we're all passionate about selling beer. That's what this is about, is people drive around selling beer all day. And we all want to sell beer. We want to sell. Solve those problems. I love the way you put it. It's less about being a sales rep and selling beer and more about solving the retailer's problems. So thank you very much.

Sales Rep X:
And can I say? One point.

Tracy Neal:
Sure.

Sales Rep X:
And I know you're about to finish.

Tracy Neal:
No go ahead.

Sales Rep X:
To Harry. Harry Schumacher's point. This is my point.

Tracy Neal:
By the way, Harry loves you because. No. Nobody's ever mentioned Harry once. And you're gonna like the fourth. The fourth, the expert on here.

Sales Rep X:
So to his point. Okay, you're your sales rep. Your merchandisers, your drivers, your driver supervisors, your vice president of operations. You're your freakin warehouse guy that loads up your your your your hot shot that you effed up on.

Tracy Neal:
Hot Shots. Yep.

Sales Rep X:
Yeah. Those guys are your team. And don't look at them any differently. There they are. They are doing a job that you are also doing your job. Don't treat them differently. You guys are all working for the same company with the same goal.

Tracy Neal:
One team, one dream.

Sales Rep X:
One team, one dream.

Tracy Neal:
Shake and bake.

Sales Rep X:
Shake and bake.

Tracy Neal:
Shake and bake baby. Thank you very much, James.

Sales Rep X:
Thank you.

Tracy Neal:
So what's the best tasting beer in America? Who cares? That's for the consumer to decide. And until they do, you will keep selling them new brands every day as a distributor sales rep. You can become a part of the iSellBeer Nation by subscribing to this podcast and using the #iSellBeer in all your social posts. Also, be sure to join the iSellBeer Nation Facebook group and visit our website. Our industry is an up and down the street business where local relationships matter. I want to thank you for making me a part of your day and wish you good luck on the objectives for your next account call. In fact, I know you're gonna crush it.

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