Ep. 014: Tigh Rickman, Tour Guide and Keg Robber

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Tigh Rickman:
I get to the gate and there's a guy who's wearing a VIP but another mother guest. A British guy. He says he goes he where's the party. I said oh this doesn't concern you sir. And he grabs around the shoulder goes and actually it does. Well turns out is Martin Roper who is the CEO for Boston Beer Company.

Tracy Neal:
My guest for episode number 14 is Tigh Rickman. Tigh was a listener of the podcast who reached out to me and introduced himself as a financial planner for retirement services. Now my first thought was that Tigh wanted to sell financial planning to the iSellBeer Network. And frankly I didn't want any part of that. But then he called me and as we talked I learned that Tigh was one of us. Having worked for Boston Beer for nearly 20 years. So in keeping the theme of tell me about your first day on the job. Here's the story of a career in beer from the perspective of a financial planner and a little advice from a financial planner. From the perspective of a beer rep. Tigh is a willing guest of the podcast. And it's important that you know that I've taken no type of payment or sponsorship from Tigh or his company. Also I want to give it a shout out and thank you to the listeners who responded to the millennial series episode number 13 with Sales Rep X. I've been contacted by several of you and I'm making travel plans for the summer. You can expect to hear episodes from additional millennial sales reps very soon And now episode number 14. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did. iSellBeer presents to you Tigh Rickman.

Tigh Rickman:
Choo choo. Now you do the music right?

Tracy Neal:
Oh wait hold on let me do it again. iSellBeer presents to you Tigh Rickman.

I am not in the fruit basket. You're Mr. Lebowski. I'm the dude.

Yeah I tell you what you can take a good look at the pictures asked by sticking your head up there but wouldn't you rather take his word for it.

Tell him we need all the freaking chips Kip

The. Don't be jealous that I've been shown online with teams All day.

We have a pain in the back. We have a pool and a pot. Of. Good.

Welcome to the iSellBeer podcast with Tracy Neal a production for sales reps and distributors who are driving around all day selling beer and the official home of the iSellBeer Nation Facebook group. And now your host the 1989 winner of the John M. Studebaker Wheelbarrow Race in Hangtown California, Tracy Neal!

Tracy Neal:
All right Tigh. Welcome to the iSellBeer podcast.

Tigh Rickman:
Thank you it's great to be here.

Tracy Neal:
Yes great to be here and thank you for reaching out to me as I said in the introduction. You're actually a listener of the iSellBeer podcast right.

Tigh Rickman:
I am indeed. Yep.

Tracy Neal:
And you reached out to me and said hey I really like your podcast. I like what you're doing. And I said Great. What's your name and what do you do. And you told me you were in the financial services right.

Tigh Rickman:
That's correct. Yep.

Tracy Neal:
So what do you do in financial services again?

Tigh Rickman:
I'm an investment adviser representative. So basically I help people manage their retirement investments, brokerage accounts trusts I help small businesses with their retirement plans for their employees. We manage endowments for non-profit charities. So basically we do it all but what comes out who is money management.

Tracy Neal:
So I have to I have to be honest at first when you told me all that you called me on this guy's call he's cold call me he wants to sell me some junk. I don't know how this relates to beer but then you told me about your beer experience.

Tigh Rickman:
That's right.

Tracy Neal:
And you have worked for multiple breweries.

Tigh Rickman:
No only for Boston Beer Company

Tracy Neal:
Only for Boston. Okay. Multiple cities.

Tigh Rickman:
Multiple cities.

Tracy Neal:
You worked all over the country. You've got an extensive background with Boston Beer. And you started to really explain to me how you knew what was going on in this industry and how you thought it was cool. And then we talked about your finance background and what you did and I thought you know what one of the things I'm trying to do for sales reps who are driving around all day selling beer is bring them value right bring them something interesting that helps them in their lives. And this is something that I had hoped the podcast would go into and then when you reached out and offered to do this I thought what a great segue to have you on the podcast because you know although we're all out there driving around selling beer all day we do have bank accounts.

Tigh Rickman:
True.

Tracy Neal:
And we do have dreams of retirement and we do have paychecks that need to be managed and that's what you do now and when I talk to you I ask you hey could you explain what you do today in the finance world from the perspective of a beer rep right either to sales rep at a distributor or whether it's a supplier rep as you were for Boston beer.

Tigh Rickman:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
So I'm excited to get into this. Thanks for offering to do that and bring that value to our listeners. Let's start off with your first day on the job at Boston Beer. That's the marquee question I always like to ask here is Tigh. Tell me about your first day on the job at Boston Beer.

Tigh Rickman:
Well my first day on the job kind of became Boston Beer legend but before my first day I'll give you a little background. I'm from Sacramento California. I went to school in Massachusetts north and north of Boston for college. And when I graduated I just wanted to spend another year in Massachusetts live off the land and then move back to Sacramento ended up bartending in Boston. That was great. Not settling down.

Tracy Neal:
Do you have a particular account you bartended?

Tigh Rickman:
It was the El Pacino and Faneuil Hall it was an Italian restaurant and I was I got the job was you know thinking this will be great. One year back to sack all good. And about two or three months into that job the rep for Sam Adams Boston Beer came in and she was doing a draft survey doing an audit a draft survey. The taps were clean and all.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
And the draft quality audit and I just kind of asked her I'm like Do you guys give tours at your brewery.

Tracy Neal:
And so what year is this. Give us a bench.

Tigh Rickman:
This is the year 2000. This is probably about April of 2000.

Tracy Neal:
April of 2000. So we made it through Y2K.

Tigh Rickman:
Made it through Y2K. We all survived somehow there. And yeah. So I asked her and just sort of on a lark you know I'd done tours and college and things like that. So I figured out you know maybe it would be some some fun to try out. She gave me the number of the guy to call.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
So I go downstairs to the payphone in the basement of the restaurant. This is again the year 2000 so payphones are still around.

Tracy Neal:
You don't have a mobile phone yet.

Tigh Rickman:
Didn't have mobile phone. So I call up ask him his name is Mark Peterson. I ask Mark my Hey my name's Tigh Rickman. I heard you're the guy to talk to about giving tours the brewery. And he said well we only have one tour guide. He's been here for three years but he's gonna be leaving in three months. He wants to call you back in three months. So I said OK sure yeah definitely call me back. Well about.

Tracy Neal:
So you weren't necessarily seeking a tour you were wanting to be a tour guide.

Tigh Rickman:
I wanted to be. I wanted job there. Yeah okay. I'm like hey I want to work in a brewery. So a few weeks later it had been three months yet but a few weeks later I called him back and said Hey we talked a couple weeks ago. Remember goes Oh I'm so glad you call I lost your number. I was trying to find it but we want you to come in immediately. All right. So I went in had an interview for the first question. The interview was since you guys. Do you like beer. Yes I like beer so it's OK. Second question would you like a beer. I said sure. So.

Tracy Neal:
Easy question so far in the interview.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah. Pours me a fresh boston lager. We sat down had pints and about 45 minutes later I was the new brewery tour guide. Back then there was only one. Now I think they have. I don't know if they've got scores of them but back in these days there's only one. And so my first day.

Tracy Neal:
And what's the what's the location of this brewery.

Tigh Rickman:
It's in Boston. Isn't the neighborhood called you make a plane which is a southern neighborhood of Boston.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
Right off the Stony Brook t stop on the orange line. And so my firm does all these ups my again long way me getting to your question but my first day was during this thing called grill and groove which was like a.

Tracy Neal:
Grill and groove.

Tigh Rickman:
Grill and it was a I was put on as a wholesaler incentive. So you your numbers you come to this big party the brewery they had live bands Stone Temple Pilots played that year.

Tracy Neal:
Stone Temple Pilots.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah. Beer everywhere. And so I'm wide eyed excited. I'm like you know this my first taste of brewery life. I'm running kegs around doing all this and it was great. I loved it. So one of the bands playing was vroom assault on a route assault. I want him. One hit wonders from the late night.

Tracy Neal:
I remember the name.

Tigh Rickman:
There they were there too.

Tracy Neal:
I am a big Charlie and chocolate factory thing.

Tigh Rickman:
There you go is there any on both sides.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Tigh Rickman:
Well so the manager for the band. Somehow talk to somebody and he's like they promised him like a keg of beer. Actually sorry to kegs a beer. For the band for their afterparty at their hotel.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
And of course everyone knows this is like this is pretty pretty sketchy situation. So.

Tracy Neal:
Sketchy in that's not what we normally do.

Tigh Rickman:
We don't we don't roll kegs off the brewery with you know just out you know.

Tracy Neal:
Without an address or.

Tigh Rickman:
Bill of lading or any of that stuff.

Tracy Neal:
To a hotel room.

Tigh Rickman:
To hotel room or more or more specifically to a Nissan hatchback it's parked on the property.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
So I don't know this was my first day so I. And of course I find this all in hindsight I find out that you know you know what rolls downhill and it comes down to the new guy. So I'm like eager to please others sure mister I'm happy to do it for you. So I load up a couple of kegs. Start rolling out the gate and now with this thing we all had lanyards with passes on and that said either staff or VIP you know identifier for the grooves and whatever. Yeah for the. For the guests versus think employees. So I'm rolling out things of close all the little pour stations are shut down. People are kind of drunk there how you know where you go with those kegs joking around oh you sorry no it doesn't doesn't concern you. You know don't worry about it that add up. I get to the gate and there's a guy who's wearing a VIP but another another guest a British guy. And he says he was where's the party. I said oh this doesn't concern you sir. And he grabs you around the shoulders goes and actually it does well turns out is Martin Roper who is the CEO for Boston Beer Company. And I have no idea who he is because he gets by first day I'm like Who is this guy. I see Mark Peterson the guy that hired me. I see him go up on a loading dock his eyes get big. They come down it all gets sorted out. But yeah that was fine.

Tracy Neal:
He was making sure you just weren't wheeling kegs off.

Tigh Rickman:
Exactly. Yeah. Yeah. He had no idea who I was. I guess this is my first day. So.

Tracy Neal:
Your twenty four twenty twenty two twenty two. So yeah you're probably not sleeping very well that night you're thinking of yourself. Oh my God, I just I just went head to head with the CEO and he thought I was stealing beer.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah. For an eight hour period I went from being elated to like I'm going to be a brewery free employee for the rest of my life too. I got started with another job but fortunately I mean it all worked out. And yeah it ended up being there for another 17 years.

Tracy Neal:
Wow, so 17 years with Boston Beer not all in Boston. I think you told me a little bit at Arizona.

Tigh Rickman:
But Arizona. I went to sales in 2006. I've been in Boston for six years but made the switch to sales and started off in Tucson Arizona was there for two years and then I moved up here back to Sacramento got back to my hometown which was the dream right. What I really had to do you know back in the year 2000 but ended up getting back to Sacramento and working for Boston Beer. So it was it was great and I was here in Sacramento in sales for about nine years.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Any other cities besides Tucson and Sacramento besides Boston. That's it. Yeah. Other than some he told me you did some regional crew drives and some.

Tigh Rickman:
Regional crew dives in my territory and Sacramento wasn't in Sacramento. I covered most all of northern California so I covered SAC outside the Bay Area so I covered Sacramento Chico all the way to Redding. Susan Bill. There were some some pretty far flung places up there.

Tracy Neal:
What was it like selling Boston Beer products in Chico up against Sierra Nevada back in the day?

Tigh Rickman:
Oh well there was that was tough.

Tracy Neal:
The day when when you know Sierra Nevada was king.

Tigh Rickman:
Oh yeah. For sure. She still in Chico. Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
She's still in Chico. Yeah. I mean she retired in the early 2000s when there weren't. They were they were king of the top three right.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah. No they. And it was tough because you know there they obviously make a great product. That's their you know their backyard.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Tigh Rickman:
Their pricing was a little more approachable than ours was up there. And I remember my first day up there I called my boss and I said I got great news. I doubled our draft distribution in the city of Chico. She goes all right. I like how many lines did you get. I got two. Now we got four draft lines in the city in Chico. So you know it was it's you know you like any market you your success is determined by the market itself. Right. So like when I went to Tucson I think my first year I was down there I grew volume. Somewhere along the lines of like 35% in one year. Yeah. And that was obviously a huge victory. Yeah but getting to draft lines in one day and Chico that was that was a huge victory too. It's all about where you're at.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. So tell me about the early days of Boston Beer too. I mean we've gone through your first day right. Were you ever inappropriately rolling kegs on property without without the right papers or process after you got through that. You were a tour guide?

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah I was a tour guide for a while. Oh I should say too I I learned how to write a bill of lading so early in the day to get those kegs off. You know in the proper way. But no I was a tour guide and then I was a tour guide for for about six months I was part time and you know I just during that time I just did everything back in those days there were only 10 people that worked at the brewery. So really you could do. There was there was there's no shortage of things to do that brewery at the time was very small was about a 10 Barrel system. It was but it was also the most important brew we brewed at because it was where all the beers were developed created conceived. It was where it was the brew the other brewers reported to. They would send in processed samples. They would send finished product samples of every run they did.

Tracy Neal:
There for the Maple Syrup story that Jim Cook tells quite often. Have you heard that one?

Tigh Rickman:
Which one of the.

Tracy Neal:
He talks about. I heard him in a conference a few years ago when he talks about brewing with maple syrup and he said that they were putting maple syrup into one of their beers and it was just perfect. And they came back the next day and they felt like all the maple syrup had the flavor had evaporated put more in and it was perfect and then it came back the next day and it was gone again. They put more and more and what they learned over a ten day period was that their nose had their smelling ability had neutralized right and they had over mapled this beer to death. And so he tells the story is one of his learning mistakes that he learned that he needed to bring an outside nose into the brewery to taste and smell the beer.

Tigh Rickman:
There you go.

Tracy Neal:
Because the maple syrup had neutralized. They're smelling sense.

Tigh Rickman:
I think that happened after my time. We did do a maple beer when I was there but it was just a one off.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
But I know they started doing like the maple the con Porter and things like after after I'd gone into sales. But.

Tracy Neal:
Did you ever get involved in brewing at all. I know you're not a brewer are you.

Tigh Rickman:
Right. No.

Tracy Neal:
Okay, home brewed at all?

Tigh Rickman:
Nothing I would brag about.

Tracy Neal:
You dabbled.

Tigh Rickman:
I dabbled. Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
I've definitely brewed it home and that's another thing about Boston beers they make sure that we have an employee homebrew competition every year and so they want the employees you know be it.

Tracy Neal:
And you've never won it.

Tigh Rickman:
I never won. Well I worked at the brewery. We weren't allowed to compete in it. We were we I thought we had an unfair advantage. So I like to say that but yeah I know. But subsequently unfortunately I did submit and I don't think I got very far in it at all. But like I said there were 10 of us that worked there at the time so we all did different things. So for example I ran the homebrew competition when I was there. I I worked in the brewery. You know not brewery per say but doing cellar work like tank transfers tank cleaning reps built grain assisted on brews. And by the time I left I was primarily almost like a marketing consultant I was doing things with the Tour Center at the Armory. We were doing you know we kind of pioneered beer and cheese pairings back in the back in 2003 somewhere in there part with Cabot for a little while we. I was also at festivals competitions manager so I was the guy that set the beer out to international beer competitions. Domestic I organized our participation in GCF. For a couple of years so did all that sort of stuff. So really like I say my view the title on my card. I think it started off saying tours tastings and special events representative and that that title encompassed all that stuff.

Tracy Neal:
A whole bunch of stuff, huh? How much did you interact with Jim?

Tigh Rickman:
Quite a bit actually. One of my one of the things I took on was I managed our beer library. So like I said the other brewers reported to us. They said the samples of beer. My job was to go through categorize the beers set some aside for our taste panel that we had on every morning in Jamaica Plain. So when we had one of the offices they had a taste. And also send the ball to Jim and Jim had a sample of every batch of every variety of Sam Adams ever created. And I'm sure that record remains intact but that was that was probably I'd say the most important aspect of my job was making sure Jim got his Jim got his sample.

Tracy Neal:
So I saw Jim in San Diego.

Tigh Rickman:
Oh nice.

Tracy Neal:
In January at the beer business daily conference by Harry Schumacher and.

Tigh Rickman:
Oh cool.

Tracy Neal:
I've met Jim probably ten or twelve times over the last 20 years I never expect him to remember me so I always introduce myself again. But we had a very nice I'll be short conversation but he's certainly a gentleman and a professional and definitely one of the you know one of the godfathers of this. Not only this industry but the industry of brewing.

Tigh Rickman:
Absolutely. And you know he's just an amazing man in general too. He's. And you say you know he probably does like the guy. I'm serious. He know he has an amazing memory and is just extremely intelligent. And I learned so much from him. Like I say I I works. I would say I worked alongside him but you know I've had my being in the brewery I had several whites had more interactions than most.

Tracy Neal:
Right I'm going to get I'm going to give a shout out then. How's that.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Hey Jim. This is Tracy Neal from iSellBeer and I'd love to get you on the podcast and I'll fly to Boston to do it. There you go. So let's talk Jim.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah he's he's the man. He is the man for sure. And yeah that's that you know I told you before. You know I miss one of the reasons I enjoy your podcast so much because I do miss the industry. I miss being around your culture and being around Jim's a huge part of that being around that. That energy that enthusiasm and just that knowledge is that so that's an experience I always treasure.

Tracy Neal:
Well that's awesome. Thank you for tuning in the podcast. And you know it's a really good segue to do what you're doing with your career now. Yeah. So how long have you been out of the beer industry officially?

Tigh Rickman:
Two years.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Two years. And what made you what made you decide. I really want to go into financial planning.

Tigh Rickman:
Well when I graduated college so going again back to 1999 now. Yeah. It's my grandparents gave me $250 worth of Starbucks shares.

Tracy Neal:
Starbucks stock.

Tigh Rickman:
Starbucks stock.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
That's kind of been. And that's.

Tracy Neal:
And at the time you received that.

Tigh Rickman:
I was pretty excited. I'm like hey it's 250 bucks but.

Tracy Neal:
When can I cash this in?

Tigh Rickman:
You bet. Well yeah. Part of me wanted just wanted to do that. And you know I'll just go back a little further and say that in my family that's kind of it has always been a thing we've always gifted you know for major events graduations weddings things like that. We gave stocks as my great uncle Krumet was a stock guy. He was a broker and he was kind of the impetus behind that. And my great grandfather I should say too was an amazing investor. I mean whatever he could put away he put away he bought stocks he bought properties and this is out in out in Tracy California.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Tracy California is in. We'll call north central California. Yeah it's like those that don't know where it's at.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah it's like halfway between San Francisco Sacramento you could say.

Tracy Neal:
It's pretty much one of the more awesome cities in the world right.

Tigh Rickman:
Just by namesake.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah by namesake.

Tigh Rickman:
But but no and that's you know he compounded my great grandfather bottle this stuff compounded stuff and that's built a family trust that every just successive generation has successive generation has contributed to.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. That's a really cool family tradition.

Tigh Rickman:
Right. So that sort of ethos was instilled in me from a young age. I what's you, what your grandfather's name William Rickman.

Tracy Neal:
Is William still alive?

Tigh Rickman:
My great grandfather William Rickman. Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So great grandfather.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah he passed away.

Tracy Neal:
Great grandfather's probably not, hot about grandfathers he's still alive?

Tigh Rickman:
He passed away too. But my my my father was also named William Rickman. Same thing.

Tracy Neal:
All right so William the Third?

Tigh Rickman:
No there's a John there. No. What's he got to know about my family is that every Rickman is named either Bill or John except for me so.

Tracy Neal:
And your name is Tigh.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
But spell it for me please.

Tigh Rickman:
T-I-G-H.

Tracy Neal:
T-I-G-H. Not the most common way.

Tigh Rickman:
Definitely not.

Tracy Neal:
It spells Tigh. Where's that's spelling come from.

Tigh Rickman:
That's my great grandmother's maiden name and when I was born my father wanted a family name that wasn't Bill or John. And so that's as he came up with Tight and.

Tracy Neal:
What's the what's the nationality or the background on that.

Tigh Rickman:
That's Irish.

Tracy Neal:
Irish? Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
It's Irish Yeah. That's my.

Tracy Neal:
As would be Rickman?

Tigh Rickman:
English.

Tracy Neal:
English. OK.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah. The my at my dad's side of the family is Irish English. My mom's side of family is Spanish.

Tracy Neal:
You have a coat of arms. You have the special plaid tie.

Tigh Rickman:
We're not. Not that. No we're not that into it unfortunately. I don't. I don't know all that much about the Mike what my tartan would look like on my kilt.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. My my my my mother's my grandmother's maiden name is Stewart.

Tigh Rickman:
Oh there you go.

Tracy Neal:
So I got the privilege when I was very young of having to dress up in the red plaid tie that represented the Stewart family. Well my grandmother who is no longer with us used to always tell me you are part of royalty. And so I really haven't cashed in on that yet. Yeah. I don't know. I don't know if I know how to. I mean now that Megan Markel is over there. Maybe I should give her a call.

Tigh Rickman:
I was going to say it's like I've it's like that. We've all seen King Ralph.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Tigh Rickman:
It could happen it could happen. You'd never know.

Tracy Neal:
Yes. I don't know. That's what made me think about the plaid tie. We always had to wear this plaid tie for family events. In fact I still I still have my plaid tie representing the Stewart family.

Tigh Rickman:
Oh there you go. Very cool.

Tracy Neal:
Good so you got into the financial planning. Really because there are this like as you said there was an ethos right. There was a DNA.

Tigh Rickman:
Sure.

Tracy Neal:
From generation to generation that it was not only important to save but important to pass that trait on to build a family trust.

Tigh Rickman:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
You've got some Starbucks stocked you still own that exact Starbucks stock?

Tigh Rickman:
Well that's what I started with the Starbucks because that said I got $250 in 1999. And like you said it was tempting to cash it in. You know I wasn't making that much money to start my career and Massachusetts not a cheap place to live. So that money was appealing but I kept my hands off it and over the years the stock split I reinvested the dividends you know the stock dividend every year. Usually Quarterly. So I didn't take that money I put it right back into more stock. And about six years ago my wife and I were looking to buy our first house and I was able to cash in those Starbucks shares and that was the down payment on my house.

Tracy Neal:
Do you mind if I ask what the value of it was?

Tigh Rickman:
About 14,000.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So looking up the Starbucks stock right now and if I have to guess from this very big graph. I'm going to guess Starbucks stock was around $12, $13 in 1999?

Tigh Rickman:
Yep.

Tracy Neal:
And today split adjusted it's $74.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah. So there you go. And again it's like you said it's split. The dividends got reinvested as well. So wasn't it wasn't just what we would call capital appreciation which is the value of the underlying asset raising but also reinvesting the the income the dividends generated by the sales.

Tracy Neal:
What was it about Starbucks. How did your grandfather pick Starbucks because...

Tigh Rickman:
I don't know.

Tracy Neal:
In 1999. I mean they're not they're not that popular. It's more of a PAC NW thing in 1999 they hadn't I think they maybe just bought Seattle's Best Coffee at that time.

Tigh Rickman:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
Probably had one or two Starbucks per city as opposed to three per shopping center today.

Tigh Rickman:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
So was there any special appeal or history or anything or why did you pick Starbucks.

Tigh Rickman:
I know that's a good question and I don't know. I enforce I never asked them but I would imagine that again uncle Krumet who was the broker whose first name was John, John Krumet Rickman but went by his middle name because again there was a surplus of Johns and Bills in my family. But my uncle Krumet was the one that probably steered in that direction. There were probably I would imagine approached him about Tigh is graduating college. We want to do something for him. What's what's a good option. And he probably said Hey I see potential in this and that's what they went with.

Tracy Neal:
Awesome.

Tigh Rickman:
Well and I glad i did.

Tracy Neal:
Too but they didn't go down the street and pick up a little Amazon while I was there.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
In 1999.

Tigh Rickman:
Well too bad I didn't pick up Amazon five years ago. Yeah. Oh jeez. I tell you. You know they've been out of control.

Tracy Neal:
Well that's awesome. So again when we had talked on the phone and we talked about what this episode would be about one of the things that you really got me excited about was financial planning and how we can you know we're not we're not here to sell anything right. In fact you have limitations on where you can do business and you're doing business in Sacramento which is obviously in California. So if you're out there listening this isn't a sales pitch Tigh is not doing this to try and get in a lot of new business. He told me he wants to talk to our audience about financial planning because he was you, right? 20 years ago he was a young guy out of college you only had a little bit of stock to his name and he did some things that you probably wish you could have done better. I know if I went back to my 20s I wish I could have done it better. And now you're in a position where you're not only in the industry but you've been educated you've taken a lot of courses you've got a lot of certifications. What do you want to talk to our sales rep audience about in terms of how they need to think about financial planning?

Tigh Rickman:
Well first all they need to think about it period and I think that that's a big problem.

Tracy Neal:
It's a good start.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah. Because a lot of times they don't. When I do like you said my story I was working for Boston Beer and Boston Beer offered a fall on Cape plan with a generous match. And I didn't take advantage of it as early as I should have I. What I didn't think I bought into it until I'd been with the company for about six years. And again that's I. That's on me. I wish I had. If you're with a company that offers you any kind of 401(k) plan and they take it. If they match. Definitely do it. I mean it's free money. If they match the 4% or 5%, 3%, 2% whatever make sure you're contributing at least up to that match if not more.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
But you definitely don't contribute to less than the match because again you're leaving you're leaving money on the table.

Tracy Neal:
Well I know it's it's hard to do. I'll share my own personal for one key story here in a minute but I would imagine some guys out there saying Well Tigh that's a no brainer. But on paycheck to paycheck.

Tigh Rickman:
Sure.

Tracy Neal:
I don't have the extra money right. I'm paying my rent I'm paying my car payment. I'm trying to save up for my my girl up my fiance's wedding ring or I'm saving up for a House.

Tigh Rickman:
Yep.

Tracy Neal:
You know I've got other things that are taking. How how what's your answer to that or what's your advice to somebody that says look Tigh I get what you're saying it's important.

Tigh Rickman:
Oh yeah.

Tracy Neal:
I agree with you. I don't have an extra $500 a month right now.

Tigh Rickman:
Well the thing is the analogy I use is investing for the future is like going to the gym right and you can intimidate yourself out of not going because you know it's the the journeys too far to want to make the start if you but if you go say you just go start walking on the treadmill OK. That leaves you running on the treadmill that leads to you know eventually getting in shape. That's analogous to putting away $10 $15 a year to you know pretty weight for your retirement. The. And I think people that work for wholesalers are especially of sales reps are in a really unique position because the upshot to you know and I know on a day to day basis that's a headache having all these brands now coming into your coming into your portfolio you have no shortage especially at breweries of you know guys knocking on your door saying give me here and you this any this is the upshot of that is there's a lot of incentives on the table. There's a lot of breweries vying to pay per draft handle pay for performance all this stuff all that. If you can view that as superfluous view that as extra money that you can put away. You know hell even if you're going on a ride with with a supplier and they buy you lunch which they should every supplier should buy you lunch if they don't if they don't. But the viability of the draft line but certainly if they take you to lunch maybe that's $10 you didn't would have spent on your own. Make it make a mental note that $10 is going get put away. I'm going to put that in my for one. Or if you have a personal retirement Halligan IRA put it in there. The nice thing about that too is you look at it and you say oh you know I'm putting away gosh I'm putting away you know 100 bucks like I really need that 100 bucks. Well it's coming up in a qualified plan like a 401(k). It's coming out before taxes. So you're not a $100 you're putting away say you're the 22% tax bracket you're really only you're putting away $88. Really. Because if you took a $100 out you'd be. I'm sorry I got that backwards. You're putting $100 but the money is coming out your paid. You're missing is only 88 because the tax liability is.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
I'm sorry 78. Gosh my math is way off this morning sorry.

Tracy Neal:
That's Okay. So that was my 401(k) story. I'd love it. I would love to take credit for this story but I'm going to I'm going to give all credit to my first two bosses. So when I got hired by Coors Brewing Company in 1994 my two bosses were Mike McGee and Tex McCarthy and it was in Roseville California which is a suburb of Sacramento. And as soon as I signed my offer letter in person there we all got in the car and we went down to Bunz and Company.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Bunz and Company.

Tigh Rickman:
49er training camp standard.

Tracy Neal:
Yes. Back when, back when the San Francisco 49ers did training camp in East Sacramento. There was a bar and there was a gentleman named Dan Bunz who was a former San Francisco 49ers. And he opened a bar there.

Tigh Rickman:
He was a linebacker that made a pivotal play on the goal line standards Super Bowl 16.

Tracy Neal:
Look at you.

Tigh Rickman:
That's it.

Tracy Neal:
Filling the blanks.

Tigh Rickman:
There you go.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. So Dan Bunz was kind of famous all the players used to go there. It was one of the favorites. I know Mike McGee was a big football player. So anyway they took me to Bunz and Company and sat me down as we finished the 401(k) paperwork at the bar and I had no idea what a 401(k) was I was 22 right out of college and Tex McCarthy and Mike McGee. He said put 15% on there. No I think my income I want to say my income in that first job was around $23,000. So in 1994, $23,000 was my first paycheck annually.

Tigh Rickman:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
That doesn't that doesn't break up to very many many coins left there when you break it up 26 ways right.

Tigh Rickman:
Yep.

Tracy Neal:
But there was a little bit of money and they wanted me to set aside 15% and I was like you got to be kidding me. I can't I can't afford this I'm barely making any money here. And you know I think it was Tex McCarthy that turned to me and he said you know what if you do this today and you do it for the rest of your life you'll never miss it. He said How much are you. How much were you making yesterday. I said zero. He goes then 15% to zero you're not going to miss it.

Tigh Rickman:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
Right. It's all incremental. And you know I have to get my hat off I'll give a big shout out to Tex McCarthy and Mike McGee because I not only did that 15% but I think ten or twelve years later it increased to like 18%.

Tigh Rickman:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
And I kept that thing maxed through my whole beer career.

Tigh Rickman:
Good on you.

Tracy Neal:
And I've got a nice 401(k) now and they get it. I'm not taking credit for this because I certainly wouldn't have done it but they talked me into doing it and it was one of the hardest things I ever did on that day. But you know what 30 days later I didn't even know I was doing it. And the next 17 years I had no idea I was still doing it.

Tigh Rickman:
Yep.

Tracy Neal:
And again I'm just so thankful that they made me do that. And they didn't they didn't advise me to do it. They made me do it.

Tigh Rickman:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
So thank you gentlemen.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah. No. And you're right to thank. That's that's huge. And to that point you said that you're the percentage you contribute went up.

Tracy Neal:
I think the laws change or something right wasn't back then it might've been a max of 15 and then I think yeah it's about 18 or.

Tigh Rickman:
Though the percentage it's not so much a percentage as just the actual dollar amount you can put but the. But if you're like you said you increase your contribution.

Tracy Neal:
Maybe that was a plan limit.

Tigh Rickman:
Could have been.

Tracy Neal:
A different plan.

Tigh Rickman:
And that's why I don't really you know. Different plans have different rules. So I can't. You can't really say one general thing but the way you say you you did increase it. The if you're getting a raise.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Tigh Rickman:
Well put that race towards it. Honestly like you get a two percent raise this year. OK. You know what. I'm living right now. You know like say they're made there's not a lot of not a lot of extra cash going around but I'm getting by this 2 percent to be nice. But you know what. Put it away. You'll net again. Don't see it. Yes. And you're it's going to be your future self gonna thank you because you're gonna be able to you're not the way to look at it is you're not you're not giving up money. You're putting it away. It's still you're still going to get it. Yeah but you're going to get it and then some as it's grown and compounded over the years. Yep. And. Yeah. That that's the way I look at it. The hardest thing in human psychology with money is to think about money you could have had right. Not losing money. It's money you could have had. Like you said I wish I'd bought Amazon all I could have had. No it's it's it's yeah. And that's sort of the same mentality right. I could have had a guy put away 50 percent I could have had that in my paycheck don't worry about it. Worry about what you got. Don't think about it. And again you're when you're when you invent a time machine in your 80s and you come back in time you're going to thank yourself.

Tracy Neal:
So lesson.

Tigh Rickman:
That 22 for doing that.

Tracy Neal:
So lesson number one is if you're working for somebody that offers a 401(k) and especially if there's a match you participate absolutely in need. And even if it's 50 dollars a month is what you're saying even if it's done. It seems a significant but 50 dollars a month might be a mocha every morning at Starbucks. That's 50 bucks a month. Hundred bucks a month doesn't matter participate in any way. Because it's like going to a gym. What if you work you know what if you work somewhere that doesn't offer a retirement plan.

Tigh Rickman:
Well then it's incumbent on you. Right. And that's you know I think that's something that's coming especially here in northern California where we have so many breweries and there's breweries opening everywhere. Oh there's they're small. You know we're we're in one of the epicenters here of the micro craft movement and these breweries are opening up there. They're running. You know they're cutting it close to the bone in terms of their finances trying to get beer out there hiring reps reps are leaving you know wholesaler jobs to become reps or these breweries and the bridges are in a position where they can offer retirement that's not you know no knock on them. They if they don't have the ability to do that or the financial ability to do it that's just the way it is or they're getting they're small but they are getting started but that doesn't mean that a rep leaving a wholesaler to go to work for a small craft brewer still can't take control of their retirement funds. The way to go about it would be take it for one. Roll it over into an IRA and you're allowed to do that you're allowed to take it for one day and roll it into an IRA. And the thing that's nice about that is it gives you more flexibility when you're in a 401(k) plan. You get to choose from these funds that the 401(k) provider provides. Right. You don't you're there's a lot of them but their funds in general are pretty opaque and I really know what you have. Can be rolled into an IRA. You can invest in individual stocks you can buy bonds you can also buy mutual funds so if to if you're if you're into that ETF. Things like that. Your options are much more diverse in an IRA than they are for one case in terms of the investment vehicles you choose. So Roland. So again you leave your wholesaler job rollover your foreman came into an IRA and then contribute to that IRA as you were working for your new year your this new brewery and you can contribute up to six thousand dollars a year to it all that money is tax free. It comes out before taxes. So basically again you're your the money money you would be paying to Uncle Sam is actually going into your retirement account instead.

Tracy Neal:
So we're getting a little bit we get a little bit to technical for me. Yeah a little too technical for me so I'm I'm I'm guessing my listeners are saying I know enough.

Tigh Rickman:
That's the thing.

Tracy Neal:
Enough brokerage guy.

Tigh Rickman:
Well it's one the it's one of those concepts where like when it clicks it clicks. Right. But again by getting it the click it's Al to say the state is designed to be complicated. Right. They keep investment. Large investment banks things like that. They want you to feel intimidated by this process. They don't want you to go to the gym.

Tracy Neal:
So what's the easy way? Right. I mean let's say we've got you know let's say we've got a listener in Massachusetts. They can't call you to do business because you're in California versus Massachusetts.

Tigh Rickman:
They could, they could they could but.

Tracy Neal:
They could.

Tigh Rickman:
But if they don't it's fine.

Tracy Neal:
OK. Yeah. We'll get to that in a minute. But they could. What's the what's the easiest way for them to do. I mean should we should you jump on fidelity.coms you jump on e-trade.

Tigh Rickman:
Your best bet. You know. Yeah. Fidelity at Charles Schwab. Interactive Brokers. I mean J.P. Morgan literally any of these large banks are going to have tools online to help you with this process of rolling rolling over. You know you first you'd open a rollover account go on to let's say Charles Schwab. Yeah go on to charlesschwab.com. Fill out their form to open a rollover IRA have an account application. That account opens up. You get the transfer you can facilitate the transfer on the same Web site bring the funds over from the fallen. They'll bring the funds over from you 401(k) into your IRA for you. And then you can either hire an investment adviser someone like me that does what I do or do it yourself. Go on there and sell the funds and look at what. Look at what to look at what's out there and actually you have to actually have control over your investments. And then like like any other bank account you can set it up to where you have the ability to contribute to that IRA account. Yeah like directly from your checking account.

Tracy Neal:
So let me ask this question. Can a sales rep. Let's say I'm a sales rep and I sell Boston Beer.

Tigh Rickman:
Sure.

Tracy Neal:
Right guy can I can I buy Boston Beer stock or do I have. Is that considered that I have inside information because I sell the brand.

Tigh Rickman:
You can. You're saying like if I if you work for the Boston Beer Company or you run a sales rep that works for a wholesaler you can buy whatever you want but basically any information that's coming out to of the market is considered is considered public knowledge and any knowledge that.

Tracy Neal:
Even if I know about a new brand that's coming out or a new commercial or and then I get as wholesalers often do.

Tigh Rickman:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
I can still buy. Let's say a Constellation Brands that can buy Boston Beer. I can buy some of those others that are listed on the stock exchanges.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah. But basically as far. And again I should try caveat this was this is how I understand it. So don't take this.

Tracy Neal:
Check with your local brokers.

Tigh Rickman:
Check with your check with the local laws as they apply. But know if it's out in the general in the public domain it's considered common knowledge basically anything that you know obviously for when you products are released and things like that wholesalers the breweries want to make sure that they're insulated not to tip off. But it's it's out there. People people know about it. It's not private knowledge. Now if you have a an uncle who happens to be the CEO of a brewery and he says hey you know we're going to do a major stock buyback or we're going to do this before and you don't do that. No. And that that's that would be insider trading and that's where you get get into some trouble. Let's. That's how Martha Stewart ended up in jail.

Tracy Neal:
So should should sales reps who are maybe managing a small small portfolio of stocks or wanting to get in stock what are the risks associated with the sales rep who does sell. As an example Constellation Brands buying Constellation Brands stock.

Tigh Rickman:
Well there's really no issue to that really. I mean if you're again they're not going to. Constellation is not going to be.

Tracy Neal:
I meant the return risks return means return risks not necessarily legal risk. I go I guess well I was kind of getting at is that maybe that's not the best idea because my job my paycheck and my incentive dollars are already tied to the success of that brand.

Tigh Rickman:
I see what you're saying. Yeah. Yeah I mean I wouldn't worry too much about that to use that example of Constellation. You know Constellation has their fingers in a lot of pies right now. They've got this deal with his cannabis company up in Canada. They're they're doing all that they're doing all sorts of macro stuff that's going to affect their stock price much more than whether I get you know a pallet drop of Corona for Cinco de Mayo at rallies. It's it's it's what you know you're you're moving the needle in your market when you're when you're increasing sales. OK. But really you know I'm not sound discourteous discouraging but in terms of the stock price it's it's kind of a drop in the ocean.

Tracy Neal:
Okay good. Now when we first sat down I turned on the recorder and I said Hey. Test. Test the audio here. Give me some ABC. And I got to tell you Tigh did not say his ABCs. He started naming every variety of hops.

Tigh Rickman:
Only notable hops. Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Okay okay. Give me give me your ABCs again.

Tigh Rickman:
You want the noble populist?

Tracy Neal:
Sure the no hapless.

Tigh Rickman:
Hello Tom middle through ten nine ten anger you got your Hirsch pucker schmaltz Baltar and soars songs of course speak for the Czech Republic not Germany but still there they're in there.

Tracy Neal:
Okay so now again not being someone who's actively in the brewing how it is this just a passion is it. You liked it either way it was bad.

Tigh Rickman:
I love it I love beer. I love. You know obviously with Boston very specifically we brewed a lot with and they still do with German noble hops. And so that was a big big influence in my mind the training. Yeah yeah. Train and training just being around it and developing a passion for it like I. Yeah. You know I still firmly sincerely believe in that that philosophy of taking the world's best ingredients making the world's best beer.

Tracy Neal:
That's awesome. Would you ever work for. I mean I know you're I know you're happy in your job right now. You're not going anywhere.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
I think I know the answer to this but would you ever work for somebody else besides Boston Beer?

Tigh Rickman:
I mean never say never but I have a really. First of all.

Tracy Neal:
You love Boston Beer, don't you?

Tigh Rickman:
Well yeah I love Boston Beer. I love what I do too. And as I you know I think that the. And yeah of course it's a beer. You know I think. Me me working for another brew is kinda like seeing you know Joe Montana in a chief's Jersey you know. Right.

Tracy Neal:
Sorry. Kansas City Kansas City.

Tigh Rickman:
I should I should don't have a chew stand too by the way. But it's still.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
But but really it's more I just really enjoy what I do now. I think there's an opportunity doing what I do now to sort of go back to what you're talking about to really help guys that are at wholesalers you know plan for their retirement. And I mean I've got a couple wholesaler reps that used to work with that have come on board with me as clients that we're we're working together.

Tracy Neal:
So we're working with wholesalers now?

Tigh Rickman:
So something. Yeah. Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Well what would you do for a wholesaler.

Tigh Rickman:
Well again it's again to go back to the the main point if you have a forward form okay often available to take it but so your company would write the plan you would not. Well we don't do it we don't. We can't we do do 401(k) plans. But primarily there but therefore we work with the employer on that.

Tracy Neal:
What's the name of your current employer?

Tigh Rickman:
DeCamilla Capital Management.

Tracy Neal:
Dican.

Tigh Rickman:
DeCamilla.

Tracy Neal:
DeCamilla Capital Management.

Tigh Rickman:
Capital Management.

Tracy Neal:
Capital Management isn't a national.

Tigh Rickman:
Nope we're local.

Tracy Neal:
It's local to Sacramento only.

Tigh Rickman:
Well I would say Sacramento we do have clients around the country.

Tracy Neal:
But the offices is in Saramento.

Tigh Rickman:
The offices were based out of Sacramento. And the majority of our clients are in Sacramento. We are really the again to use a beer analogy. We are the the regional craft brewer of Investment Advisers which I think offers a lot of advantages we're not you know we have person relations with our clients we're not working on such a scale that we're you know treat people as numbers or assets we actually know our clients have relationships with them and you guys have you have like your own brokers do you have your big big pot of cash. Well.

Tracy Neal:
How does this if you're if you're the Kraft right. Yeah. How what makes your system work?

Tigh Rickman:
We are like so we're the advisor. We do have a custodian. We work with Charles Schwab. So.

Tracy Neal:
That's the answer I was looking for. Right.

Tigh Rickman:
So all the assets are held at Charles Schwab but we were we're completely independent of them.

Tracy Neal:
Okay, so you're independent Charles Schwab you're the custodian for your agents but the backbone of making everything work is on backed by Charles Schwab.

Tigh Rickman:
Charles Schwab holds the assets.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
So if you came on board and we you know Tigh we talked today I really I feel so bad about missing out on Amazon. I want to buy some Amazon. We would be the advisers that would put place to order for you in that account. And then subsequently go on a man.

Tracy Neal:
And Schwab would hold the assets.

Tigh Rickman:
And Schwab but actually have the stuff you. Well technically you do is Schwab Schwab is the bank the accounts in your name. You own that you own the assets they're yours. We are just hired to manage them for you.

Tracy Neal:
Excellent. So I like that clarification because I think that can give value to a listener out there if you come across a craft his brokerage house the right word.

Tracy Neal:
No we're not but we're an investment advisor so if you come across a craft investment advisor that you've never heard of.

Tigh Rickman:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
Right. And you're a little bit sketchy like Who are these guys how many employees do they have. Do they have enough money to back this thing you. Did they build their own trading system. I don't know. The question they should ask is Where are the assets held and for you. The answer is Charles Schwab.

Tigh Rickman:
Right. Exactly.

Tracy Neal:
But if they're in their own hometown and they come across investment adviser of a craft store they can ask that question and maybe it's going to be Charles Schwab. Maybe it'll be an invitee. Advisers can act as their own custodians too. So the advice sometimes advisers will hold the at will hold the assets that are there that are their clients. And you know there's no there. And that doesn't necessarily mean that they're not on the up and up but they're the way we feel is there is a certain level of again security for the client knowing that they have full access to their assets at all times.

Tracy Neal:
And so they would use the Charles Schwab app as well as a Charles Schwab web portal?

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah you can't. I know I my I rolled my four. Again I'm not just the types of number of also client. I rolled my 401(k) from Boston Beer into an IRA and I manage it obviously myself as I and I look I use my Schwab app.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
I see it it's right there and it's held by and Deacon all the capital we are the managers of it.

Tracy Neal:
Okay great. So let's get into it.

Tigh Rickman:
Let me say this really as to if you're if you are looking out there looking for an investment adviser and you're looking for someone to help give you guidance in the investment you're going to make with your with your retirement. Make the keyword look for forced fiduciary.

Tracy Neal:
Fiduciary?

Tigh Rickman:
You want to make sure their fiduciary is fiduciary me. It means that basically they work exclusively in your best interests. There are no there's no ulterior motives at all to the trades.

Tracy Neal:
Are there in an investment groups that are not fiduciary?

Tigh Rickman:
Oh yes absolutely. And the that there was a they proposed to the fiduciary standard law in 2015 and it was allowed to expire last year. So for a brief time Cup the major investment houses were starting to work towards complying with fiduciary standard. And then when that went away they just don't have to.

Tracy Neal:
So the question is do you have a fiduciary duty to represent my interest?

Tigh Rickman:
Exactly right.

Tracy Neal:
And that means that legally you have to act in my best interests.

Tigh Rickman:
Right. The analogy I'd use is and I'll just say this to the winner again Deacon Miller capital management we are fiduciary.

Tracy Neal:
Will you spell DeCamilla?

Tigh Rickman:
D-E-C-A-M-I-L-L-A.

Tracy Neal:
DeCamilla Capital.

Tigh Rickman:
Capital. Yep. We maintain our fiduciary standard by really staying away from mutual funds or things like that. We only we only invest in straight equities.

Tigh Rickman:
Why stay only for mutual funds. I thought mutual funds were kind of like the easy way to get diversification and lower risk.

Tigh Rickman:
They are. And the if you're just starting out. If you're you know you say you're contributing at 10 15 dollars a day or what have you to hold it up. That's the way you want to go. That's really the only way.

Tracy Neal:
Okay so they are good.

Tigh Rickman:
But typically if you're when your account gets to a certain size it behooves you really to for the sake of clarity and the sake of just understanding what's going on to get into individual stocks and that that's how we invest.

Tracy Neal:
And what size is that from your recommendation?

Tigh Rickman:
It varies in person to person. You can't give a blanket statement for it but.

Tracy Neal:
It depends on what your goals are what your age is what our income is.

Tigh Rickman:
Exactly.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
Exactly. But the do we meet. And that's how we maintain our fiduciary standard by only trading in stocks because a lot of these funds pay commissions and kickbacks to investment advisers and brokers for their hay. And I get these e-mails all the time on my work e-mail of funds asking to hey have you heard about this hot new girl they're out there. You know pitching them left and right. Yeah. And you know hey there's a you know you'll get a sales commission on from us if we put these people in this fund.

Tracy Neal:
So that's an example of somebody who does not have a fiduciary duty as they might.

Tigh Rickman:
It might it might impair their fiduciary duty so.

Tracy Neal:
They don't want to say you should invest in this mutual fund because I've got a commission slash.

Tigh Rickman:
Let's say let's say your your rep you go into an account. The account says hey man hazy IPA these are hot right now. I got to get a hazy IPA on draft.

Tracy Neal:
Yep.

Tigh Rickman:
What do you what what should I do. Well as a rep covering all the other accounts of the area you know that I don't know. Well you know that the heretic hazy IPA is out of control right now.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
It's cranking. They're selling a ton of it. But on your PSP or your performance this month.

Tracy Neal:
Your incentive.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah. You've got like say Idaho Goose Island hazy IPA.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
So you say OK I'm going to give you goose island hazy IPA. Is that the best thing for the account. No. But does it fill their needs. Technically it's a hazy IPA although it's not the one that's really the best fit for them. And that rule you are not acting as a fiduciary. You're you're you're writing what's there what's called their best interest and the best interest standard is the only thing investment advisers have to me.

Tracy Neal:
And this is why we had you on the podcast. So I think everybody everybody now understands fiduciary duty because we've all been there where there was the right thing to do for the account and then there was the incentive right things that for the account.

Tigh Rickman:
And so a fiduciary is going to be the one that sends in that heretic. Yep.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
For sure.

Tracy Neal:
Awesome.

Tigh Rickman:
So. So that that's that. Carney Castro of that is that is the reform you're seeing now with an investment adviser you're going to.

Tracy Neal:
Were all the big boys like the big companies that you see on TV and stuff they all have fiduciary duties or does it.

Tigh Rickman:
Not really. No they are the guys it's a suitability standard as well. And so the suitability standard means that this is in a generic sense. This this fund is fit for your needs.

Tracy Neal:
It's suitability as opposed to fiduciary.

Tigh Rickman:
As opposed a fiduciary.

Tracy Neal:
So like.

Tigh Rickman:
And again that's the advantage of working with a.

Tracy Neal:
Dues island has suitability.

Tigh Rickman:
Has suitability heretic is the fiduciary is the right fit. This example yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
That's the again that's the advantage to working with a smaller investment adviser. Again a craft investment adviser someone that is going to take the time to understand what you need what your goals are what your current challenges are in terms of funding the front of the account or what have you and tailor a plan to you as opposed to a plan tailored to 26 year old wholesaler rep makes X amount of dollars.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
Wall Street by x age.

Tracy Neal:
Okay awesome. Now I want to get into what you can do specifically for some sales reps in California. You know we approach this and I said the beginning you know we're not here to sell anybody anything. So if you don't like tie don't call. But I also want to say you know what. There's probably somebody there's at least one person out there going. This guy rocks. I love him explained a lot of things. I really trust the fact that he's been in the beer industry. He's give me this fiduciary analogy that just rocks now. And I want to call him or I want to see what he can do for me. So what would somebody in the industry do to contact you and would you be able to do for them.

Tigh Rickman:
Well I'm more than happy to meet with anybody or help anybody out if I can.

Tracy Neal:
Can you only have customers in California. Because.

Tigh Rickman:
We can do we. The way the law structure we can't I can't have clients in other states just a limited amount.

Tracy Neal:
Oh, okay.

Tigh Rickman:
That said I'm happy to help anybody out any way I can. You know when I spoke with you on the phone you know when I first went into sales my four first set of boots on the ground in Tucson Arizona. Yeah. You know I'd been there. I knew beer. I know a thing about sales. I don't know anything about the market. I don't I really literally never been to Tucson before. And my wholesaler.

Tracy Neal:
Did you make it to Wilcox by the way?

Tigh Rickman:
I did not. I did not.

Tracy Neal:
My dad grew up in Wilcox.

Tigh Rickman:
Oh really, cool.

Tracy Neal:
I've been in Wilcox a lot of times. Let's just put it that way.

Tigh Rickman:
There you go. My wife's from Thatcher which is right outside Safford which is sort of that same more or less out which by my side that I mean outside of Phoenix in Tucson. But I don't know anything coming in there about the thing and my wholesaler. I worked with down there which was the Tucson branch of a lion's beverage at the time. You were amazing. They were. They showed me the market. They taught me so much and they helped me. I would not I'm glad I mentioned. Right. Hey you know 35 percent growth in Tucson my first year there that's all owed to a lion's beverage in the work they did in the help.

Tracy Neal:
It's awesome. You know I often I asked my guest you who do you want to give a shout out to. Right. Who's out there in the industry that you wanna give a shout out to a big thank you. I mean we'll start with my good friend Jim.

Tigh Rickman:
Jim Cook.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah but other than that. Who else is out there that you want to give a shout out to that helped you in your early beer career?

Tigh Rickman:
In my early.

Tracy Neal:
Or maybe your whole entire beer career.

Tigh Rickman:
Oh I mean you can't even start. I mean literally I mean I just just that anyone was associated with that that that Tucson Tucson Branch.

Tracy Neal:
The Tucson Branch by Alliance?

Tigh Rickman:
Oh yeah absolutely. It was just again that they were the reason and that's you know it's that gratitude. Right. Are that nice gratitude but also just that know sort of a sense of owing right.

Tracy Neal:
Somebody took the time to teach you and help you along right now you want to do the same back.

Tigh Rickman:
Send it back. Yeah. And I mean the same thing can be said of the whole I worked with here in Sacramento with TBI Sacramento. Yeah. TBI Truckee TBI Chico you know Redding Distributing those guys.

Tracy Neal:
Redding, yes.

Tigh Rickman:
Redding.

Tracy Neal:
The Janssen family.

Tigh Rickman:
And don't forget DNL up in Susan Hill.

Tracy Neal:
DNL. Yep.

Tigh Rickman:
Those guys you know when we had when I saw the program and they were the ones throwing up five case stacks they were the ones building the displays. They were the ones ensuring the case went in and the draft lab draft handles went on so that I don't know I I understand that the success I had in the beer industry was you know it was a team effort. It wasn't just me doing it on my own. Yeah I understand that a lot of that there was a lot of you know a lot of work women on the wholesaler and making that making those programs happen and now I look and see what's going on with no wholesalers again. Leave jumping ship to work for small breweries. I have a retirement benefit. Yeah and it's I don't know. I just want to help out. So I am a resource. And if they you know I'm not going to charge it to give me a call if you want it. Colleges have me give you some advice I'm happy to do it. That's not. Yeah. Not selling anything they just if you.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
If you want to call out.

Tracy Neal:
So if somebody wants to call you and say hey I've heard this I want to clarify my situation here's what I'm at.

Tigh Rickman:
Yep.

Tracy Neal:
Thank you very much. I'm gonna go spend money with my local planner. You're okay with that.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah that's fine. That's fine. I mean it's just. I'd rather yeah I'd rather see it rather referred to another investment advissr than see them be out there you know swim with the shark. Do we not acted. You know what I mean and that's that literally is what's going on out there. I mean it's it's criminal. What how how difficult it is to save for your retirement nowadays. Yeah. And that's something I wanna help out with.

Tracy Neal:
All right let's throw out your email and your phone number. Tigh what's your what's your email?

Tigh Rickman:
My email is tigh, T-I-G-H @ decamilla, D-E-C-A-M-I-L-L-A, capital, one word, C-A-P-I-T-A-L, dot com and you can reach me at area code 916...

Tracy Neal:
916.

Tigh Rickman:
979...

Tracy Neal:
979.

Tigh Rickman:
0870...

Tracy Neal:
0870. You know I'm going to put those in the show notes so you get so listeners you can look that up in the show that's all repeated again so Ty's email is tigh and again he spells it T-I-G-H @ decamillacapital. DeCamilla is D-E-C-A-M-I-L-L-A, and then capital, C-A-P-I-T-A-L, dot com his phone number is 916-9790870, again 916-9790870. Give him a call if they call you and they say look I'm at square 0 here I haven't done anything I want to get started and I want to get started with you would explain how that conversation is gonna go so they can know it if they want to expect.

Tigh Rickman:
If we say they want to.

Tracy Neal:
I'm not I'm I'm a sales rep I've saved nothing I don't have a 401(k).

Tigh Rickman:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
I'm encouraged by what you said I can save six dollars a week.

Tigh Rickman:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
And you said that was better than nothing what do we do next Tigh?

Tigh Rickman:
Well I can direct you to direct you to how you can open an account like with Schwab say walk through that process and then such have to contribute to it if you want us to if you want me to actively manage your account for you that's an option as well but again.

Tracy Neal:
At six dollars a week there's not a lot of work.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah I know that honestly we we do it would be hard I wouldn't be able to manage again it wouldn't be cost effective for you really. So but I definitely will.

Tracy Neal:
And you could get it started and then.

Tigh Rickman:
I could show you I'm walking through the steps you how to set up an account.

Tracy Neal:
Three, four years now and there's $10,000 in there.

Tigh Rickman:
I'll still be here.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah. As we as we establish I want to work for another brewery likely.

Tracy Neal:
That's so awesome.

Tigh Rickman:
I'll be I'll be there to help out if you need and if you have a 401(k) you want to roll over into an IRA I can help you walk through that process to give you some give you some guidance on setting that bad boy up to.

Tracy Neal:
Awesome give me let's we're about to wrap this up here we give me one I want another good beer story when you were out selling.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Tell me about the first time you got your first placement you remember your first placement or maybe your first draft handle?

Tigh Rickman:
First draft handle is bump stads on fourth AB in Tucson Arizona.

Tracy Neal:
Look at that look how people now.

Tigh Rickman:
That's it man.

Tracy Neal:
Bump stads on Fourth Avenue in Tucson Arizona. First Draft handle

Tigh Rickman:
Boston Lager. Yep.

Tracy Neal:
It was a Boston Lager.

Tigh Rickman:
And I we've got at Boston Beer they've got a an internal voicemail system you know and so you're supposed to.

Tracy Neal:
You kinda use to have to use it the pay phone when you hit pay.

Tigh Rickman:
Exactly. This is back. My first draft line was 2006. So we called you know you call in your first post calling your first draft line to mark Rubin who was the one of the trainers. Yeah Boston sort of teaches the walks. New hires through the air through orientation. So you call Mark. You leave a voicemail saying first draft line here. It's time to sign first draft line and Boston lawyer bump stads Fourth Avenue Tucson. OK. So I left that voicemail. Mark Rubin said and then put forward it out.

Tracy Neal:
He forwards it to the category and cuts his own little awesome job times.

Tigh Rickman:
Hey quick shout out to Tigh Rickman of Tucson Arizona guys first draft line only took him six years. Congratulations.

Tracy Neal:
Because you had five and a half years at the brewery right?

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah yeah yeah. So that was that was good right. Definitely. Yeah. You know you never forget your first one.

Tracy Neal:
No. Don't you remember a particular retailer that took care of you?

Tigh Rickman:
Oh well I mean I got I got him at.

Tracy Neal:
Thousands.

Tigh Rickman:
But thousands by me.

Tracy Neal:
Really really. You guys kind of clicked in.

Tigh Rickman:
Well I you know I. The nice thing about this job too and one of things I do miss about is just the relationships you build not only with wholesalers but also accounts in my PI account that honestly was always there for me. I worked really well with and I hopefully I hope I helped them out too as the boxing donkey in Roseville.

Tracy Neal:
The boxing donkey.

Tigh Rickman:
Boxing donkey.

Tracy Neal:
So it's such a famous account Roseville.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah. Those those guys are there. It's an amazing place. You guys got to check it out. The heart of old town Roseville. Best menu on the planet. New know menus out. Give it a shot. Give it a. Give it a. Give it a go by. But there. Yeah. They were awesome.

Tracy Neal:
Excellent. Okay. Well one last question for you if you. Would you be willing to take a day off and go do a crew drive with me here to Northern California. I'm going. I'm doing a crew drive in Memorial Day. My team and I were going out to Ohio.

Tigh Rickman:
Ohio.

Tracy Neal:
We have. Yeah we have. We have distributors and probably 39, 40 states that use the iSellBeer software platform and we like to go crew driving. You know I mean we're not we're beer guys to start.

Tigh Rickman:
Yeah.

Tigh Rickman:
Right. We happen to sell software services but we're beer guys and we miss crew driving so every once in a while we're on the big holidays we call up a distributor say let's go through drive so the team and I are going out to Cincinnati for Memorial Day for three I think three or four days it's just a crew driving the trade and we've got quite a few customers here in Northern California. Are distributors. Yeah. I can't promise honestly have Boston Beer at all of them but if you'd like to crew drive I'd love to get you back out there throw in some cases for an.

Tracy Neal:
I would be open to that for old time's sake. Yeah. Dust off my old dust off my old sales book and a shoulder bag. Yeah. Why not.

Tracy Neal:
Awesome. Let's let's plan on that later this summer. I'd love to take a road trip with you. Maybe I'll go up to Redding and see the Jansen family up there and gonna just hit the road stack some cases say hi to retailers and just remember what it's all about local relationships and helping people sell more beer.

Tigh Rickman:
That's it. That's what it's all about.

Tracy Neal:
Awesome. Tigh it's been awesome.

Tigh Rickman:
And make sure they can retire in comfort.

Tracy Neal:
Yes I'm retiring comfort. Tigh it's been awesome to talk to you to get to know you better. I thank you I hope our listeners thank you. I hope you get some phone calls again. Tigh's number 916-79. Let me start over. 916-9790870. See if we can break his phone. iSellBeer Nation or at least send him a text and say hey thanks for the interview. All right. You can find us on Facebook Twitter and Instagram under iSellBeer Nation. This is Tracy NeAl and Tigh Rickman. Thank you very much Tigh. It's a pleasure.

Tigh Rickman:
Tracy. Appreciate the time. Thank you.

Tracy Neal:
Take care.

Tigh Rickman:
Bye bye.

Tracy Neal:
So what's the best tasting beer in America. Who cares. That's for the consumer to decide. And until they do you will keep selling them new brands every day as it just shows your sales rep. You can become a part of the iSellBeer Nation by subscribing to this podcast and using the #iSellBeer in all your social posts. Also be sure to join the iSellBeer Nation Facebook group and visit our website. Our industry is an up and down the street business where local relationships matter. I want to thank you for making me a part of your day and wish you good luck on the objectives for your next account call. In fact I know you're gonna crush it.

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