Ep. 016: Lester Jones, NBWA Chief Economist

16 Lester Jones.mp3 transcript powered by Sonix—easily convert your audio to text with Sonix.

16 Lester Jones.mp3 was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best audio automated transcription service in 2020. Our automated transcription algorithms works with many of the popular audio file formats.

Tracy Neal:
Last night, when we were at dinner, you had a really good idea for a a beer podcast, you said, Tracy, Tracy, I got this great idea for a beer podcast that we can do. And I said, Lester, I have a beer podcast. And he goes, No, no, we're gonna do this together. Okay. So tell me about. Tell the tell the audience your idea, because I thought this was really cool.

Lester Jones:
The most difficult places to deliver and sell beer in the country. And it dawned on me when I looked at Robert's island.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Lester Jones:
Parker Island, I'm sorry. Washington, which is a little piece of the United States that is attached to Canada.

Tracy Neal:
My guest for episode number 16 is Lester Jones. Lester is the chief economist for the National Beer Wholesalers Association. And we recorded this episode after just completing a two day crew drive with our execution partners at Ohio Eagle in Cincinnati. The reason we did a crude drive first was because Lester, who's been in the industry forecasting, reporting and communicating the economics of beer for over 15 years, had never been on a work with with a distributor. So we put Lester on a route and then he and I sat down in the boardroom across from each other at a 12 person table and recorded this episode. He now has the micro experience to go with his macro economic expertise. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did. I sell beer presents to you. Lester Jones.

I am not Mr. Lebowski. You're Mr Lebowski, I'm the dude.

Hey, I tell you what, you can take a good look at a is asked by sticking your head up there. But wouldn't you rather take his word for it?

Film and eat all the frickin chips. Kip a point. Don't be jealous that I've been shown online with games all day.

We have a pawn in the back. We have a pool and a pot of good for you.

Welcome to the iSellBeer podcast with Tracey Neal, a production for sales reps and distributors who are driving around all day selling beer and the official home of the iSellBeer Nation Facebook group. And now your host. The 1989 winner of the John M. Studebaker Wheelbarrow Race in Hangtown, California, Tracy Neal!

Tracy Neal:
All right. Lester, how are you doing today?

Lester Jones:
Doing great. It was a pretty darn fun day. We had we had a pretty busy day. Started around, started early this morning. Lots of rain, lots of traffic.

Tracy Neal:
Oh, it rained hard today huh?

Lester Jones:
It did rain hard today. Lots accidents. You know, there's a great quote from a movie that I like to tell people. It's life is full of interruptions and complications.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Lester Jones:
And I tell you what that was, that was pretty much.

Tracy Neal:
That was your day on the route.

Lester Jones:
That was the day. Yeah. You know, and I'm sure that's an average day for most of these guys. So for someone like me.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Lester Jones:
Who spends a lot of time flying at 35,000 feet and looking down on all the activity and all the things that are in play to make the beer market work, you know, suddenly settling down and going full tactical at ground zero. The street level right at the street level is definitely something everyone that flies at 35,000 feet needs to do more often, I think.

Tracy Neal:
Well, that's that's a really good segue, because when I first asked you if you would be guest on the podcast, one of the things I said, hey Lester. I know you're an economist. I know you're really smart guy. And you're talking about a bunch of crazy macro economic things that make the beer and issue work. But when I have you on the podcast, let's try and talk about not only that, but let's also include some things at the street level, almost like when you were on to work with.

Lester Jones:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
And your response to me was I've never been on a work with.

Lester Jones:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
And I said, you're kidding Les. You've been in this industry forever. You've never been on distributor work with. And so I invited you and you accepted it.

Lester Jones:
Absolutely. I wouldn't pass out the pass up the opportunity because it's hard to practice what you preach. And certainly strategically, everyone has lots of visions and lots of ideas and lots of data that explain how the industry works. But, you know, when we get down on ground zero and you start doing the tactical stuff, it's a whole different picture.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah,.

Lester Jones:
So it is very important for me. And I greatly appreciate it.

Tracy Neal:
Well, I appreciate you doing. I mean, you took time out of your week. You flew here to Cincinnati. You were here at Ohio Eagle. And that's Danny, Ohio. You went out and now you went out on a route today. And that helped a lot. Was the sales manager?

Lester Jones:
I helped a sales rep relatively younger. She was great. Maybe twenty six. First job out of college. So clearly in this demographic of, you know, older people making strategy, younger people executing tactically. And there's a generational, you know, you know, how conflict there because they think differently than we think. And so that was really good because like I said, you know, interruptions and complications and when we started out ran into heavy winds and heavy rains and accidents and detours and finally got to our first account. And, you know, first thing we started, you know, talking with the bar manager who there obviously has.

Tracy Neal:
You were on premise today.

Lester Jones:
We were all on all on premise, yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Key week going into Memorial Day. I went into a three day weekend. There's a lot of action going on, not only off premise. I was off premised on my my work with Jim was also off premise. And I think Cameron was off on premises. All four of us that went out and did crew drives here for a couple days at Ohio Eagle. It was really good. What what was your sales reps name?

Lester Jones:
Kayla.

Tracy Neal:
Kayla, was Kayla aware of the NBWA and she ever part of it?

Lester Jones:
No, I signed her up for the e mails. I say, here's a daily, daily brew. We send it out every day. It has lots of industry level information

Tracy Neal:
Tell me about the daily brew because that's something that maybe a lot of sales reps haven't heard of. I know. I get it. I value it. I always get snippets in there. What is that?

Lester Jones:
Okay. So NBWA for those of you who don't know, is a trade association that represents beer distributors around the country. If you listen to Craig Purser's podcast a while back, you know, he went into detail about what we do and how we do it. So we just have a newsletter that goes out every day and it just kind of aggregates industry and business related news into a nice little brief newsletter and you can click.

Tracy Neal:
It also features a distributor employee have the day or something like that, right?

Lester Jones:
Absolutely. You have the employee of the month and beer distributors can nominate their employees that they think are special. We feature them when we tell their story.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Lester Jones:
And, you know, we've we've had some really great stories over the years. So it's good. You know, you get that man. You know, if you don't get it, sign up for NBWA.org.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Lester Jones:
Get the newsletter. Pay attention. Because if, you know, I introduced the kale and she's like, oh, I didn't know that. And I said, well, here, look, here's a story about, you know, how Seltzer's or Duman might give you something a little extra in your talking points when you got. You know, a couple of minutes with a, you know, a bar,.

Tracy Neal:
Did you sign up for the podcast by the way/.

Lester Jones:
I did not. I was more in his sandwich.

Lester Jones:
Kayla, please sign up for the podcast was purely self-interest. Sign up for my newsletter. I don't want to overburden her with.

Tracy Neal:
Today it's our podcast by the way.

Lester Jones:
It is ours.

Tracy Neal:
Yes, it's our podcast.

Lester Jones:
So but anyway, now we I mean, first stop, you know, right off the bat, we hit we hit a nice little sports bar that had, you know, had a roof cave in with all the snow. And so they had just rebuilt. So there's a whole story around that. And we chatted a bit with the bar managers there. And, you know, we hung up a sign and stood back and looked at it and she really realized it had the wrong price on it. So we had to pull it down. So interruptions and complications and, you know, and it's easy to go to it's easy to go strategic and say we're gonna do all this. But when you sit out and you put up a sign on a door and you walk away, you look back and you're like, that's not right. Yes, I'm coming back. So that execution. And, you know, it was it was simple dyslexia. You know, I was 92 cents was confused with 29 cents. I do that all the time. And I with numbers all day long, constantly, you know. You know, transposing numbers like that. So he's honest mistake. Easy mistake. But, you know, once again, it's all of a sudden the first call, the day's interrupted. Yeah. You know, and that was that all that. And that was before the accidents and the thunderstorms and the police and everything else trying to drive around in the crazy weather that we're having out here in the Midwest. But overall, I mean, it was it was good. We had a good time.

Tracy Neal:
So what did you what did you learn from Kayla in terms of being on the route that maybe was the most surprising thing that you didn't realize that an on premise distributor sales rep would deal with on a day-To-Day basis?

Lester Jones:
Relationships is how quickly she was good. She she every relation you handle relationship differently, even as you know, you talk to one person in this kind of manner and you can talk to another person.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Tailor for each buyer.

Lester Jones:
She knows. She knows who the people she knows the people who don't want her to touch their stuff. Give me this. I'll take care of it. Yeah. She knows people are like, yeah, please to put it over there. That would be great somewhere over there. So, you know, as we went to all these different accounts, she had a really good ability to kind of like adapt to the person she knew, the person she knew, the bar manager she knew the owner. She knew the you know, the people that were working there, the relationship building that we know was so important that we just say kind of randomly, that's our relationship business and these relationships matter. Well, the reality is, is that you walk in that door and you got to be able to read right away how that person's feeling. You know, they have a good night last night. Yeah. One lady had a really good night the night before. Made a lot of money celebrated a little too much salt on it. Yeah. But she also probably had a little too much fun, too. So she was kind of under the weather, but she was there, you know, posted strong. You know, right it right when when things opened in place, some orders and we ordered some beer and talked about some different products. And, you know, but absolutely. She was ready to roll with the with the relationships and the the interpersonal communication and taking the cues from people of how who's busy and who's not. That's great. Yeah, I was.

Tracy Neal:
What what kind of insights did you gain from me? You know, sometimes I usually don't get too much into brand trends because I feel like they will expire six months from now and not be that important to listen to. But I also know that this is your job, right? Macro economics, equity industry is exactly what you're doing. And I know that, you know, when you and I were talking last night, you're looking at all kinds of transbay segment. You mentioned by brand, by supplier. And of course, these are macro trends across the whole country. But today, you in the blade that you're in, the blades of grass, you know, account by account was anything that you saw that was kind of like an either. Aha, that confirms exactly what I thought or wow. This is an outlier. I didn't see this in the data.

Lester Jones:
It was it was a little bit of both. So, you know, you were in Butler County, Ohio, I think is where we are. It's actually like middle America. And it actually when you look at the averages, it's about eighty thousand dollars a year income. Well, that's about household income. That's about what the US is. So it's right on average with you.

Tracy Neal:
So we're in middle America.

Lester Jones:
Yeah. Yeah. And you know, when you look at some of the other data, like, you know, how much people spend on alcohol beverages, they spend about $500 a year per household.

Tracy Neal:
And is that about average?

Lester Jones:
About right here. So we're very much average with the US. And when I was out in some of these on premise accounts with her, I yeah, I was looking at the brands that are out there. Look at the price tiers that are out there. And it was very reflective of the average beer market that we talk about.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Lester Jones:
And you know, there's some some bad jokes about averages that you know so well.

Tracy Neal:
There's a lot of average out there?

Lester Jones:
Yeah, there's a lot of average out there, which is good, because when I looked at you, when I looked at the portfolio of brands that people were selling and I was talking to some of the guys about what sells good, you know, they they sold a little bit of high end. They sold a little bit of low and they sold a little bit, you know? You know, premium product. So it really was represented. It's not like when you're in D.C. or New York and everything's all high and or when you're in some other market. I won't name it that. You know, everything's low end. You know, here wasn't my fault. This is a pretty good portfolio of product to. And when you look at the data, you're like, oh, look, they're pretty much average household income, the average consumer expenditure spend, the average alcohol spend, average on premise, beer spend. You know, it's like, wow, this this is how it's supposed to work out.

Tracy Neal:
What about innovations and line extensions and new brand new packaging? I mean, I was in the office today and I I learned a lot. There was a lot of brands that I touched that I haven't seen before. And there's a lot of activity out there. Did you see any of that in the on premise?

Lester Jones:
Yeah. I mean, it's funny because. Yeah. Yes, I saw that. But it's the slow adoption. I think that's interesting.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Lester Jones:
And when I talked to some of these guys, I talked to one one Mexican beer. I was that we were in a Mexican restaurant. That very pretty amazing selection of beers for a Mexican restaurant, which usually has a handful of them. He had a pretty wide selection and he was pretty. You know, we talked about how some of the new brands that had came on very slow to adopt. And sometimes they would go very quickly and then all of a sudden fade off. Oh, there was one, you know, the Estrela brand. L.A. go, you know. He's like, yeah, came on really strong. And and it's kind of fell off and I don't need it anymore. And we start talking about it, you know, as you know, by the time we were done, he's like, okay, I'll just take another case, you know? So, you know. But you know what sticks. I tell him to I'm like, yeah, I guess at the start, a lot of this brand innovation doesn't happen.

Tracy Neal:
Takes time.

Lester Jones:
Takes time, just like this relationship takes time. It's the same way that those brands take time. These brands take time to grow. And, you know, the trust between, you know, the guy coming in and making the bar call or even trusting the bartender and say, hey, this is new, try it.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. You know, speaking of taking time, we were talking with these guys I was with today and we were talking with the buyer on the massive success of Michelob Ultra and all the different brand line extensions. And I said, you know, it's actually amazing because Michelob ULTRA was a disruptive brand introduced to to complement the Atkins diet, which was two thousand four.

Lester Jones:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Lester Jones:
Yeah,.

Tracy Neal:
It was 15 years ago.

Lester Jones:
It 15 years ago...

Tracy Neal:
That's a long ago.

Lester Jones:
When we had when that Atkins all that crazy Atkins stuff came up. And even though the even though the science was didn't match with beer, you know, I mean there was you know, they conflicted and no one really understood. They still came out with that low carb stuff. And here we are years later, finally growing legs and taking off.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah, absolutely. So in your role at the NBWA, can you kind of explain to us what your role is and what what you provide for the members of the NBWA or what you provide for the greater beer community?

Lester Jones:
So, yeah, I like I said, I mean, I spend a lot of time looking at the national statistics.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Lester Jones:
And a lot of times I will. It's always good to look at the averages and.

Tracy Neal:
You're looking forward or backward?

Lester Jones:
I well you use the data that we've collected, you know,.

Tracy Neal:
Backwards to predict forward?

Lester Jones:
To look forward again. So when I look at a market that's above average income and it's, you know, higher homeownership rates and higher educational attainment and and and then you look at the the businesses that are surrounding the the the community, you get a feeling of what kind of beer is going to be consumed there. And, you know, and and I was talking to Kayla and I was, you know, I think, well, how do you find new businesses here, for example? I mean, she's got a lot of it's word of mouth, I think. Really? Yeah. Stop in. And it accounts. I'm saying, hey, they're building a new restaurant over there and building a new bar over there. You know, and then you kind of grow it that way. So. So for me, looking at those growing growing marketplaces is certainly important because to sell beer, you need stomachs. You know, a lot of people don't start at that really basic concept.

Tracy Neal:
To sell beer. You need stomachs.

Lester Jones:
You need stomachs. You need people living around you. And you know, you need economic development. You need businesses growing. You need households forming and houses being built to support these businesses. So in a place like here we are, you know, in Butler County, you know, they they're doing pretty well, adding homes and businesses growing, growing around them. And as as those communities grow, the beer market will grow even if we're losing share to wine and spirits in the big picture. You can actually have a growing business just because you're adding people into your community.

Tracy Neal:
Ok.

Lester Jones:
So if you're a sales rep and you're out there driving around, you see a lot of buildings going up in a lot of see a lot of homes going up. And you're looking at your local paper and you're hearing about a new business opening up. You know, these are good things. These are know, even if you're getting this negative vibe from industry trade press about how beer's losing the wine and spirits or how, you know, beer is being consumed at the same rate it was 20 years ago. But if you look around and you see all these businesses that are opening up and people are moving in and that's another stomach. That's another you know, we can look at shares, stomach share, throat share, stomach share, a wallet. But in order to even start there, you need to have people. And that's that's that's where you really take the big data. And then you look down into your marketplace to say, OK, I know that. I know that Ohios, you know, kind of a higher maybe doing just about average. Right. OK. In terms of its economic growth and in some point. But I know that this bill, Butler County, is doing really well. And why is it doing well? Because I see all.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah, there's a lot of growth right here. I mean, man across the street, there's a brand new Topgolf.

Lester Jones:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
Right. And over by our hotel, there's about seven hotels. Right. Residence.

Lester Jones:
You don't put a top you know, top golf doesn't build something that huge unless they expect to fill up with people and top golf people spend a lot of money and now spend a lot of time.

Tracy Neal:
It's a great account and across the street from the top golf is an IKEA.

Lester Jones:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
And somebody once told me that Topgolf tries to follow IKEA's in terms of land development.

Lester Jones:
Really?

Tracy Neal:
If there's an IKEA somewhere. Topgolf is very interested in being nearby. Interesting. I don't have any credible backup on that. Somebody once told me.

Lester Jones:
I'll take the heresay, I'll take the the market gossip for what it's worth.

Tracy Neal:
That's because I kid pulls from so far away IKEA. It doesn't really say I support a community of kids, supports lots of comedians, and I feel like my experiences I'm the few times I've been to an IKEA, such as it's all day Chip. I'm willing to drive maybe an hour and half, two hours to go to the IKEA trip.

Lester Jones:
Right. And that's you're absolutely correct. It's a it's it. You need to have. You need to have that growing community to do it. So then the question is, and what do I do if my communities kind of decline? Right. You know, you know, all of a sudden you're sitting and you're staring at a, you know, marketplace. You see a lot of closed signs and a lot of vacancy signs. You know, these people are moving out and that means you're going to have less stomachs and less beer. Yes, that's a problem. You know, and, you know, being aware of where your opportunities are and where they are not is very important. And even if you're a new salesperson and you're driving around your car, you know, you got to see, hey, opportunity to the left. Not so much to the right. You know, and the people go where the activity. You know, you see that top golf going up. You see the you know, the new construction and the new homes. And, yes, pretty good place to go hunting for beer.

Tracy Neal:
So how long have you been at the NBWA? I think you told me the other day. Six years?

Lester Jones:
My this is my six years.

Tracy Neal:
Going on six years? And before you work at the NWA, you worked for...

Lester Jones:
The Beer Institute.

Tracy Neal:
Beer institute?

Lester Jones:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
For how long?

Lester Jones:
For about 10.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. And before that?.

Lester Jones:
Before that I work for a company called Arbitron Nielsen, which the ratings company like the scanner they get. Most people are familiar with Nielsen IRA data.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Lester Jones:
So yes, I've always been deeply immersed in analytics and data, trying to tell stories with data and for the very beginning.

Tracy Neal:
Telling stories with data.

Lester Jones:
Yes, telling good stories.

Tracy Neal:
Telling good stories with data. I like the way you said that.

Lester Jones:
Because, you know, it's it's easy to it's easy to kind of go in and chitchat. But it's always nice to kind of have some some data behind you to say, hey, did you know that, you know, people spend about $500 a year on alcohol beverages? Most people probably don't.

Tracy Neal:
I didn't know that.

Lester Jones:
You don't know. You know, and then being able to say, hey, you know, we live in a place where people actually spend a little bit more than average, you know, but they spend a little bit less than average, but, you know, a little bit more high end in general. So, yeah, you can you can tell stories with data to help convince people to to to buy more.

Tracy Neal:
Now, if you go back to Lester Jones and say junior high six, seven, eighth grade, what did you think you wanted to be when you grow up when you were growing up?

Lester Jones:
Wow. It was funny because back then they always gave us these tests to remember the tests. And I'd always get insurance salesman, actuary, and then for some strange reason, a forest ranger. So I really. Yeah, I get I get these really. This is really schizophrenic job profiles. Like insurance agent in the forest. Can we can give him a break here. I don't get it. So now I had no clue I would do economics or even beer. At that point in time.

Tracy Neal:
And I think you told me the other day that you had your master's degree?

Lester Jones:
Yeah I have a master's degree in economics from University of Delaware.

Tracy Neal:
University of Delaware.

Lester Jones:
The Blue Hens.

Tracy Neal:
The Blue Hens.

Lester Jones:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
The University of Delaware Blue Hens, that is trivial knowledge for our listeners right there.

Lester Jones:
Well.

Tracy Neal:
Except the ones in Delaware.

Lester Jones:
Except for the ones in Delaware.

Tracy Neal:
Everybody else write this down. In case it's on a trivia question at a bar. The University of Delaware Blue Hens. OK. So do you remember when did you start applying your economic experience and storytelling with data in the beer industry? Was it when you started the Beer Institute?

Lester Jones:
So, yeah, when I started the Beer Institute.

Tracy Neal:
Because there's a lot of. But there's a lot of boring industries you could do this for and you have a beer. Which is really cool, right?

Lester Jones:
It's incredibly lucky.

Tracy Neal:
It's incredibly lucky.

Lester Jones:
Very fortunate lucky.

Tracy Neal:
It's cool, it's fun, it's fortunate. It's just an awesome place to be. If you're gonna study data and tell great stories, why not be in beer? Right. And you're here. So when I'm curious to find out, when was that moment in your in your life when you went from I don't know what you were studying before and you stepped in the beer and you're like, oh, yeah, this is it. This is cool, right? This is wake line and everything.

Lester Jones:
I knew at the main. I got the interview and I walked in the office and I sat down with a gentleman by the name of Jeff Becker, who was the president of the Beer Institute at the time. Other liquor was a great guy and a great you know, a great mentor and a great leader and just a great beer guy. Someone you would want to sit down and have a beer with.

Tracy Neal:
Was this in Colorado?

Lester Jones:
No, this is in Maryland.

Tracy Neal:
In Maryland, okay.

Lester Jones:
I'm sorry, this is in Washington, D.C..

Tracy Neal:
Washington, D.C.

Tracy Neal:
Yes, they have Beer Institute is Beer City is a trade association that represents the larger brewers and importers and Anheuser-Busch, Miller, Coors, Constellation, Heineken and then the BA, which is the Brewers Association based in Boulder, Colorado, tends to be more small brewer and focus.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Lester Jones:
Now I think there's members epilogue both.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Lester Jones:
So where was the supply we call it? It was the brewer tier, the brewing side, the manufacturing, the brewing side of the industry. And and, you know, it was the beer statistics have always been here are the barrels. You know, the case is here share. You know, here's the economic impact. Here's how many people work here.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Lester Jones:
You know. But it's reality is it's a lot more exciting than that. You know, it's why is why is the volumes this way? Why are the shares and say what are the underlying stories? So I started that. Why is it the Beer Institute? I started doing a lot of presentations with the data and kind of I don't want trying to make it more interesting, trying to tell the story a little bit beyond just the numbers. You know, why do we have you know, why do we have imports while we have a lot more Hispanics that spans some parts of the country? Hispanics make up 25 percent of the population. Forget Texas, for example. When you look at the statistics and you look at the less than 20 year old population, it's a quarter of them Hispanic. You know, and that's big because they will grow into a much larger, you know, as they age into the population, they will grow into a much larger share overall. So it's all it's all the stories about beer are told, are told with the data stored, with the economics is told, with the demographics is told. You know, why is top golf here? Top golf hears because people spend, you know, 200 hours. You know, to come here and there and they look around at all the people who live here and they like these people will come here because I.

Tracy Neal:
Seems like talk of always wants to be off the side of a freeway, too, so that you can see that, you know, you'd see this giant nets, you can see this three story building

Lester Jones:
It has good branding in it.

Tracy Neal:
It's great branding. Yes. They've got a lot of that. So much branding on the inside, too. Everything. Other buckets in their T-shirts and their hats, everything stopped.

Lester Jones:
You just need a giant sign that says drink beer here pointing down at it.

Tracy Neal:
Well, I'll be interesting. As top golf continues to grow, if people actually say, do you golf? And the answer is no. But I talk golf.

Lester Jones:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
You know what I mean? I like the idea that that is interesting because the idea of a driving range used to be for real golfers to practice their golf.

Lester Jones:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
But I my experience at Topgolf and I guess I should explain the Topgolf isn't because we all listeners in cities who haven't seen tough, tough, tough, Topgolf is a three story driving range with a heavy entertainment aspect to it in terms of I don't compare them to another national chain. But it's it's a national restaurant chain. Right. A lot of or deserves a lot of appetizers, a lot of burgers and ribs and fries and a lot of beer and a lot of beer. Yeah. Yeah, a lot of beer. And the cool thing about top golf is the balls that they use have these little radio frequency controllers in them. And so when you hit them, it tracks it. And there's there's giant holes in the driving range. Right. Giant holes, maybe 40, 50 feet wide. And they're color coordinated so that when your ball goes in the giant hole in a particular segment almost like playing darts with your golf balls. Yeah. You get dirty at certain games and there's like close out just like there is in darts. Right. And there's longest drive and there's points for that. So it's entirely possible that there's a whole generation of people who play top golf, but they don't actually ever play golf. And I think that's.

Lester Jones:
Right. Yeah. And. And they spend people spend a lot of time there.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Lester Jones:
I looked at some research. I looked at some numbers early on. Just if you go to their home page and you look at like how much people spend on average and how much time they spend there. It's pretty amazing. And they do have a pool, but you have, you know, beer, wine, bar or restaurant. And if you get something to stay for three hours, they can drink a lot and.

Tracy Neal:
They provide you with the balls and the golf clubs. So, again, if you're listening, you've never been to one, you're going to find a Topgolf. All you have to do is shop with your wallet.

Lester Jones:
Shop with your wallet, exactly.

Tracy Neal:
There's a lot of fun.

Lester Jones:
Make sure your friends that come with you have wallets as well.

Tracy Neal:
Yes.

Lester Jones:
Because it's a great place to freeload.

Tracy Neal:
And even even a 5 year old, 6 year old, 7 year old can do it, too.

Lester Jones:
They'll have fun as well.

Tracy Neal:
They rule it off the high side. Roll it in. So one of the marquee questions on the podcast is I've asked everybody is tell me. Hopefully with some level of detail. Do you remember your first day on the job from the beer side of your career? Not post beer, but when you got into it and the beer side, maybe it wasn't the exact first day. It was the first midweek, first month maybe was your first big conference that you remember in great detail. We were like, this is really cool.

Lester Jones:
That's very easy because when my first day at the Beer Institute in Washington, D.C., I walked in the door and they said, this is the library of the old Beer Institute. We are downsizing. We're giving up this space where you need to go through all of this material and decide what to keep and throw away and what to give away.

Tracy Neal:
And how big is this room?

Lester Jones:
It was huge. I was stacks and stacks of books in newspapers and magazines going back to the 50s.

Tracy Neal:
And what year is this?

Lester Jones:
This is would have been 2003 or four, I guess 2004. And the first thing I opened up over half an hour was gone at 10,000 more books. So how can I sit back? And I'm like, oh, this book is half German and half English. Oh, the people that founded Bearing in America were actually mostly German. So back in the 1800, they all did their meetings in German and then paid someone to translate. So yeah, it was I mean I I was screwed from the minute.

Tracy Neal:
So it was like hired you for job B. But before you do that job go and do a job A which will take you a year.

Lester Jones:
Year to clean out.

Tracy Neal:
how long did it take?

Lester Jones:
A while, I took a long time. I mean, I figure out a way.

Tracy Neal:
Did you find any diamonds in the rough and he's like amazing manuscripts. or anything like that?

Lester Jones:
Yeah, yeah, yeah. It's full of just jams. You would have prepared you. I would have brought them and shown you some of them. They're just, you know, they're, you know. So the Beer Institute collected data for years from members. So at one point, there was a ledger sheet from a I think it was a Schlitz brewery and it was kind of a handwritten. Counting of all the beer they made.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Lester Jones:
And that's how they folded it up and put it in ambulate, put a stamp on they mailed it to the Beer Institute. And of course, the Beer Institute got it and they opened it up and then they added it up and they sat back. And then they later something came from an Anheuser-Busch brewery and they opened that piece of paper up. So that was the speed of data back then. You know, that's just long ago. Yes. You know, 1960, 1970. You know, and I mean, that's how they shared information through the mail and everyone sent in a paper report. And, you know, when someone patiently sat down and added it all up by hand and then tallied that up and then they had weed, there was there was printing equipment physically at the Beer Institute. When I was there, it was all go into the. Which was another tragedy because it was on almost antique. But, you know, ran.

Tracy Neal:
Looks like the books of Ellis Island.

Lester Jones:
Exactly.

Tracy Neal:
All those books were destroyed.

Lester Jones:
Right. Right. But, you know, you know, luckily, a lot of those records are still around. I mean, we can still go and find out how much beer was made in 1950 by Schlitz Brewing Company. That's still part of that record. It's still out there. So this wasn't kind of like the last single record, but it was kind of like the origins of all that, because it was back in those days, the Beer Institute was a very large organization. It had regional office. It was back then it was a US Brewers Association, the USBA. It's gone through a lot of iterations. But for that, for the most part, they're you know, that's how you collect data. So like I say, you open up a book and, you know, there's you know, there's some there's living history right in front of you. So I found that one point I found a little pamphlet that had the patent engineering. It had the mechanical drawings and patent information for how to open a beer bottle. Really? That's there is literally it was really I have a picture of it. And one of my one of my things. But it was it was like patent number one, two, three, four, five, six. This is the this is the most efficient design of a bottle opener, because remember, at one point in time, it was, you know, you know, it was beer was packaged with mostly draft beer, 50, 60 percent of it was draft. It was sold in taverns. It wasn't until we got into packaging and bottles, but eventually we got to this point where, you know, we had efficient ways of capping bottles and someone actually sat down and did the math, you know, and you're like, you would not have to dig it up. Hopefully I can finally.

Tracy Neal:
Do that and send me a picture. I'll put it on our Facebook page. It's iSellBeer Nation of Facebook.

Lester Jones:
Exactly. Put it on there because people we like. Yeah. Some guy actually sat down with the slide rule on a calculator and did the math. Those days are gone. Right. So I can keep going on. There was just so much good information and history and and just novelty in all the beer business.

Tracy Neal:
Now, coming into the industry, not necessarily your first job. How much were you into beer as a consumer?

Lester Jones:
Oh, I wish we were. When I was.

Tracy Neal:
You love beer?

Lester Jones:
Yeah, I like beer. I was a beer hunter. You know, we had when I was younger, we had a copy of Michael Jackson Beer Hunter. We beer hunted probably before it was legal for me to do such. We had a we had a great brew pub in Baltimore, probably '86 of that 1986 that that we would go down to. It was, it was systems on Federal Hill had stockade in Braille, probably late '80s I think. Then we'd go up to Stoudts Brewery in Pennsylvania which is pretty early on. We love going out to. Shoo. There's a lot. We were we were always into beer and we would go up when when I was in University Delaware and in the late '80s we go to a place called State Line Liquor that had probably the most beer crazy beer selection ever. And it was called state line liquor, because back then there were a lot of blue laws and everything. And Delaware had no sales tax. So, yeah, the buses, the buses of people going up to Atlantic City would pull in there. They had giant parking lots everywhere and go and shop tax free at the liquor store, load up the bottom of the buses. They all directed drive back down to Maryland. Yeah, that is beautiful beer selection. And we had as college students, we all go over there and scrape as much money as we can get get together and, you know, taste to all kinds of beers that we could find. So, yeah, we we've always been always been interested in beer and always had a head over the head appreciation for good beer.

Tracy Neal:
You had it last night. We were at dinner. You had a really good idea for a a beer podcast. You said, Tracy, Tracy, I got this great idea for a beer podcast that we can do. And I said. Lester, I have a beer podcast. No, no. We're gonna do this together. Okay. So tell me, you tell the tell the audience your idea, because I thought this was really cool.

Lester Jones:
The most difficult places to deliver and sell beer in the country. And it dawned on me when I looked at Robert's island.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Lester Jones:
Parker Island, I'm sorry. Washington, which is a little piece of the United States that is attached to Canada. So it's a.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. You were showing me on that.

Lester Jones:
It's a little peninsula. It's attached to Canadian Canadian land, but it drops down below the parallel.

Tracy Neal:
Like a little thumb.

Lester Jones:
It's like a little thumb attached to Canada, but drops below the border. So it becomes a little outpost of the United States that's attached to Canada. I'm staring down like, well, how did they get beer there? A couple of phone calls and some people.

Tracy Neal:
You've actually called people.

Lester Jones:
Oh, yeah.

Tracy Neal:
You just didn't think about this. You. You picked up the phone. You called a couple distributor.

Lester Jones:
Yeah. Mike, how do you get beer up there? And I explained to me and so I called another guy and there a you know, the island all the way at the end of Long Island at the end of Montauk. There's an island beyond it.

Tracy Neal:
And there's like the last island in the Florida Keys.

Lester Jones:
And the last in the Florida Keys.

Tracy Neal:
Kodiak Island in Alaska, all these places are very hard.

Lester Jones:
All these places have beer for sale. And, you know, I think it's a great story. I think we should investigate. We should talk to the retailers. We should talk to the distributors. And we should say, tell us your tales of woe, because everyone deserves a beer, no matter how far or how difficult it is to get it to them.

Tracy Neal:
I think we should do. Where in the world is Lester Jones and listeners write in and tell us where they want to send you? I'll stay here. But you don't want to play, you know, all these places. Then I'll call you and ask you what's it like to deliver here in this very day?

Lester Jones:
It's got to be. And there's gotta be some pretty high places in this country and mountain tops and ski resorts that, you know, beer.

Tracy Neal:
But Death Valley, right?

Lester Jones:
Yeah. Yeah. We're talking about Death Valley. How does it how does it. How does it get there?

Tracy Neal:
It's called Badwater.

Lester Jones:
Badwater.

Tracy Neal:
Badwater Saloon and Hotel right in the middle of Death Valley.

Lester Jones:
In the middle of nowhere?

Tracy Neal:
It is in the middle of. I've been there. It's you know, it averages like 125 degrees in the summertime. It's a middle of nowhere. The Badwater Saloon and Hotel.

Lester Jones:
Now, I'm sure that you call up and say, hey, I need beer, you know, and I'm out of Bud or I'm out of Miller on a matter of, you know, whatever. And someone's still gotta get in a truck and drive all the way out there. And I think we should find that we should find like the most the most remote place in the country that has its furthest away from every distributorship. And just what how many miles do you actually have to drive to get that customer, that beer? And since it's so far remote. Yeah, probably doesn't require a lot of beer. But once again, we're beer distributors and we want to get the beer. Every case counts. Every case counts. And you know, you want someone who's in the middle of nowhere to walk into a bar and, you know, you know, have a beer call instead of a liquor call or anything like that.

Tracy Neal:
And a lot of times winning at the local level, you know, in the streets is about going the extra mile against your competitor.

Lester Jones:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
Right. Going the extra mile and doing the actual little thing that sometimes your competitor isn't doing at that point in time or you're just you just dig a little deeper making it happen.

Lester Jones:
Yeah. So, yeah, I think, you know, you know, a little podcast letting people know. So sometimes it's hard to drive down that road when it's pouring down rain and there's accidents and there's detours and there's a hangover bar manager who really doesn't want to see you. Well, at least I'm not driving all the way up to the Death Valley and risking a flat tire or an overheated radiator.

Tracy Neal:
I'll make some phone calls and could do some remote interviews to the hardest places to deliver beer by beer distributor.

Lester Jones:
I think it'd be a good story. Give everyone will get a good chuckle.

Tracy Neal:
And well, like you said earlier, good stories with data. So could not only investigate the story, but then you can start bringing us, you know, the miles to the closest distributor, the population economic area. All that kind of stuff.

Lester Jones:
What's bringing people there? Is it you know, is it a tourist mecca? There a lot of tourists coming through. And there's little there's there's a lot of there's a lot of data around, a lot of data that tells the story about why these places exist and what drives them and what gives them economic value.

Tracy Neal:
It's such a great industry. We're so lucky to be in it and be able to have fun conversations about this kind of stuff.

Lester Jones:
Exactly.

Tracy Neal:
If there were if there were a few people that you wanted to say thank you to that have been your mentors, your bosses, maybe they worked for Slav suppliers, small suppliers, maybe they were distributor people. But, you know, there's somebody out there that I always ask the podcast interview with this, you know, do you wanna give a shout out to say thanks for helping me along in my career?

Lester Jones:
Oh, hands down. I mean, the person that hired me into the business was Jeff Becker. He was a great boss. He is a great guy.

Tracy Neal:
Is Jeff Becker still in the business?

Lester Jones:
No, he left us way too early. He passed away, unfortunately. But, you know, he was a guy that, you know, brought me into the boardroom at the Beer Institute and sat me down with some of the, you know, the captains of our industry. And, you know, I met a lot of a lot of people that, you know, had been in the business a long time and.

Tracy Neal:
Generations.

Lester Jones:
Generations. Exactly and you know, and then Craig Purser, who is the CEO and president of NBWA. You know, when I was done being at the Beer Institute brought me over, kept me in the industry. You know, and, you know, recognize that I had some institutional knowledge and, you know, carried me forward. And let me keep telling these crazy stories and thinking of these crazy ideas, you know, about how to bring data in the beer industry together so people helps people be better and successful. I think.

Tracy Neal:
That's awesome. One other thing I'm gonna ask you and ask you to explain that little graph you showed me last night with the dots where it was data became information, automation became knowledge and knowledge became clear in the defense or wisdom.

Lester Jones:
Yeah, I put wisdom and common sense at the same. I read a quote out of a book I was reading, kind of it's kind of like everyone. Everyone lies. It's a book.

Tracy Neal:
The book is called Everyone Lies?

Lester Jones:
Everybody Lies, you should read it. It's a short little books from a Google data scientist. His name is Seth. He writes a book called Everybody Lies. And he you know, he gives the Google data sciences. But what he says is, you know, your grandmother is big data. You know, we look at big data and we think big computers and lots of information were your grandmother's big data. You know, when you bring that girl home, she takes one look at her and she instantly knows you stay away from her or you bring that girl home. She takes one look and she says, oh, what a nice pick. She doesn't she does that evaluation very quickly, but she does it because she has a history and she has knowledge. And she's accumulated lots of data points because she's met lots of friends who've been mismatched over the years.

Tracy Neal:
Your grandmother is big data.

Lester Jones:
Grandmother represents big data because she has accumulated a wealth of information over a long period of time that allows her to very quickly and accurately assess the outcome of this of this relationship. She doesn't need to think about it, shouldn't need to shake hands or say hi or spend any time she takes one look and she knows and that. And and part of that is, is that when you start with, you know, we all start with a lot of information, a lot of data, a lot of bits and pieces of data. But, you know, that's just data. That's just the first story. That's just a collection of it, taking that data and making it into kind of like information. Yeah, that that is a little bit more condensed.

Tracy Neal:
So the graph you showed me showed data with a bunch of dots?

Lester Jones:
It's all the dots is all that information we collect.

Tracy Neal:
And data grows into information.

Lester Jones:
Information, which is the beginning of the you start grouping those dots in the into the groups of relevant information that you can use. But that doesn't stop there because information becomes kind of knowledge. What I learned from this information, I can apply in a knowledgeable way. And then eventually you have you have this wisdom, this level of common sense, its ability to just kind of look at the data and know where it's headed. And so I when I like to get people thinking about not just about collecting data points and that's collecting about the number of cases I saw older, it's like, well, why did I sell that number of cases and how do I make sure that I know why those cases were sold and how to repeat those case sales? Because data becomes information becomes knowledge becomes wisdom and common sense. So when you walk into account, you know, from your from your history, I know exactly what's going to work here. And that's how you bring data alongside you. Yeah. Not in your everyday activities. Just knowing how it progresses through that that that chain, that evolution of just being simple data points.

Tracy Neal:
When we talked about data versus information last night, because I was telling you that we often have to approach that and help the distributors who are our customers understand the difference between collecting data versus information and advice. I think you said I taught you something on Henry Chadwick, right? Henry Chadwick, the godfather of Scorekeeping in baseball. Did you liked that analogy?

Lester Jones:
Exactly. Yes. Analogy I did. It's a great analogy because it's just you need to have a method and you need to have.

Tracy Neal:
When you said we were developing currency, right? We were ball ads.

Lester Jones:
Yeah. The currency conversation. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. Because data does data doesn't really mean anything by itself. It's like you have a billion records, you have 10 billion data points, you've collected all this information and yet it's all sitting there. Well, you know what? You know, it doesn't mean anything until everyone else recognizes that it has value. And that's what a dollar bill is. Everyone collectively looks at a green dollar bill and knows exactly what it's worth. And it's our job. At least my job is to figure out how do I take data, turn in information, and then turn it into into knowledge and wisdom that everyone recognizes and holds with the same amount of value. Yeah. So that's that's my ultimate goal.

Tracy Neal:
What's what's the coolest thing you see going on right now in the beer industry associated with that?

Lester Jones:
There's a lot going on. This is a you know. We are the beer industry is it's pretty good analytically. I mean, we we we live and breathe by the numbers. We do a lot of.

Tracy Neal:
You're really good at spinning them in our favor.

Lester Jones:
Yes, we're very good to and good at spinning numbers. We're good at kind of collecting all this data. What we need to do is we need to evolve and we need to evolve our our analytic abilities so that, you know, retailers that we meet with, you know, start having faith in the currency that we bring them, which is our information. So, you know, you know, walking into someone saying, hey, this product bearing index is on fire and everyone's buying it. All right. Well, look here. Here's my number. And while he just saw someone from another distributorship come in with another piece of information that said, here's my number and it's on fire. Yeah. Now, all of a sudden, he's got two people and he doesn't know which one of those dollar bills is counterfeit. So, you know, we have we have data, but it has it's not currency yet.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Lester Jones:
You know, and, you know, it's you know, a lot of guys have chain relationships and they they they've convinced those chains that their numbers are the currency and they have a very strong bond and they trust each other's currency. And there's guys coming in at the side with some other things that they say are real currency and they don't trust them yet. Yeah, but for you know, where I went today, you know, for the guy, the fry in the Mexican restaurant or the sports bar, we met a nice little old lady who had a bowling alley. You know, they don't know what the value of these currencies are. They don't know what's worth the dollar and what's worth 50 cents Canadian dollars. Drawing upon a Mexican peso for me, son, you know, I was a mom. I wasn't born yesterday. So that's that for me as an economist and someone who lives and breathes by the numbers. You know, I think the next evolution for our industry is really finding strong currency in our data and our ability to convince retailers that what the the proposition that we're presenting to them has is real and has value. And I can see value.

Tracy Neal:
Yep.

Lester Jones:
In God, we trust.

Tracy Neal:
In God, we trust.

Lester Jones:
In beer we trust. I trust this. I know that you've told me that this is a hot brand and it's selling well. And I don't feel like I'm taking a big risk by bringing it on.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Lester Jones:
And that's where that's where all of a sudden you're you've evolved from little data points, knowledge with common sense, you know, value, true value, what you have.

Tracy Neal:
Okay, I've got one last question. Again, I think to get your you me get your passion levels up here. Last night we went and visited a grocery store.

Lester Jones:
We visited the mecca of all grocery stores.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Not just any grocery store. But we were we were crew drive. We did a crew drive yesterday. Cameron, Jim and I and Cameron came back to the hotel and said, you guys have got to see this grocery store. He started to describe jungle gyms.

Lester Jones:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
And I'm going to ask you, tell us about your experience at jungle gyms.

Lester Jones:
Jungle gyms was a place I describe it as a as a as a beer store inside. Let me see how and how best to say this. It's like walking into a mall that has a Costco inside next to a PetSmart with a Whole Foods and of, you know, a total wine and liquor or, you know, a giant mega alcohol beverage store. No, I mean, all under one roof. And it's purely independent. So the guy does whatever he wants. You know, he puts you know, he's got things hanging off the wall and all.

Tracy Neal:
In the fish department. There was the SS

Lester Jones:
Exactly like a rough.

Tracy Neal:
Gilligan's Island.

Lester Jones:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
Not a miniature one. Right.

Lester Jones:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
It's like a 44 foot boat.

Lester Jones:
Right. Right.

Tracy Neal:
The meat and fish department.

Lester Jones:
Right? Yes. Yes. Minnow. And yeah, he's purely independent. He can be whatever he wants and he's having fun. It wasn't like it was ex corporate corporate chain that has strict rules and where everything goes now. It was amazing. I mean, we saw hookah pipes and hookah. We saw ground dom for you know, we saw $1000 bottles of wine and champagne.

Tracy Neal:
Six thousand dollar bottle of wine.

Lester Jones:
Six thousand dollar bottles of wine. You know? And then we saw the longest aisle of hot sauces and honeys and jam.

Tracy Neal:
Not only did we see hot sauce, but there was a section of the hot sauce roped off, said adult access only because there were 50 to 60 hot sauces with less than appropriate labels and names on them.

Lester Jones:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Lester Jones:
And we found an ostrich egg for $70. You know, to inventories an ostrich egg that costs $70. I mean, that was my wife and I thought was I don't think maybe they just buy one and see if it sells. But there was a stack of them.

Tracy Neal:
Is it? It's like the size of probably two magic eight balls.

Lester Jones:
Yeah, it's huge. And you know,.

Tracy Neal:
The 25 pound bag of peanuts.

Lester Jones:
Twenty five pound bag of peanuts. But who knows.

Tracy Neal:
Kombucha Bar, right?

Lester Jones:
Right. They'd not, you know. Places have they had beer bar, they had a wine bar, but they also had a kombucha bar.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Lester Jones:
And then it had alcohol kombucha and non-alcohol kombucha of course. No, but then the drink aisle. Yeah. Everything about that store was just, you know, I had never seen it.

Tracy Neal:
Four thousand beer labels.

Lester Jones:
Yeah.4,000.

Tracy Neal:
And as you enter it's like you're entering a zoo. There's there's a giraffe and there's an elephant and there's a waterfall. There's a pond. And all these speakers with all these jungle noises. How about the bathrooms?

Lester Jones:
The bathrooms are definitely a hoot as well. A must see bathroom.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. I'll try and describe it. So the external entrance of the bathroom is a porta potty? Yes, it's a straight up plastic little white roof with a vent on it porta-potty when you open it up, you walk through into an actual right.

Lester Jones:
But you walk through like a jung. It was all jungle. Now you seem, you emerge into this crazy old.

Tracy Neal:
So jungle gyms in Ohio. I think there's two of them.

Lester Jones:
Yeah, it's definitely, you know, doing the, doing the the road trip family road trip stuff where you're.

Tracy Neal:
Oh yeah, it's a stop. If you're driving, if you're driving through Ohio. It's where the stop.

Lester Jones:
Yeah. You don't have to buy anything. You know, you just have to grab a beer at the bar and wander around.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. We walk the whole store with beer and.

Lester Jones:
Yeah, I think we were there for almost an hour. I think we're there for pretty much by time. We were down, we were hungry. We went out. We had good food, you know.

Tracy Neal:
Excellent. So I said that was I. One more question. Are you gonna be ready to do another crew drive with us sometime? I don't pin you down to an exact date, but I'd love for you to be able to get out do another crew job with us at some point somewhere else and somewhere else in the country.

Lester Jones:
We'll find somewhere or find another location somewhere. I mean, so since this I don't want to bust in Ohio is being average America or middle America. But we'll pick something that maybe is either super low and or super high end just to get the the economic disparity of the, you know, of the beer market.

Tracy Neal:
There's a few states where we can do both those in the same day, right?

Lester Jones:
Yes. There are these states that we could do that, you know. Oh, that would be fun. Yeah. I'd appreciate coming back again.

Tracy Neal:
Well, thank you for going anyway. Thanks for coming to Ohio. Thanks for doing a crew drive. I owe you a big thank you. A big shout out to Ohio Eagle. Thank you to John and Devin and Matt and also to see who you rode with Kayla today. I rode with Matt today. I rode with Caleb yesterday. Jim rode with him and we rode with it. I know Cameron rode with Tim Wright and Jim run with somebody else. I forgot his name. Sorry, but thank you for having us out.

Lester Jones:
Yeah. It was a pleasure. Thanks for having us.

Tracy Neal:
Thank you. Ohio Eagle for letting us do a crew drive in your market. We stack pallets and pallets and pallets of beer.

Lester Jones:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
This week, the leading in the week.

Lester Jones:
Right before Memorial Day.

Tracy Neal:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
Let's hope the weather holds. I did hear a lot of people fretting about the weather. We'll see what happens.

Tracy Neal:
All right, awesome! Thank you, Lester. Have a good week. Travel safe home and thanks for being on the podcast.

Lester Jones:
Thank you.

Tracy Neal:
So what's the best tasting beer in America? Who cares? That's for the consumer to decide. And until they do, you will keep selling them new brands every day as a distributor sales rep. You can become a part of the iSellBeer Nation by subscribing to this podcast and using the #iSellBeer in all your social posts. Also, be sure to join the iSellBeer Nation Facebook Group and visit our website. Our industry is an up and down the street business where local relationships matter. I want to thank you for making me a part of your day and wish you good luck on the objectives being next to count call. In fact, I know you're gonna crush it.

Automatically convert your audio files to text with Sonix. Sonix is the best online, automated transcription service.

Sonix uses cutting-edge artificial intelligence to convert your mp3 files to text.

Sonix has the world's best audio transcription platform with features focused on collaboration. Here are five reasons you should transcribe your podcast with Sonix. More computing power makes audio-to-text faster and more efficient. Quickly and accurately convert your audio to text with Sonix. Create better transcripts with online automated transcription. Automated transcription is much more accurate if you upload high quality audio. Here's how to capture high quality audio. Better audio means a higher transcript accuracy rate. Sometimes you don't have super fancy audio recording equipment around; here's how you can record better audio on your phone.

Sonix uses cutting-edge artificial intelligence to convert your mp3 files to text.

Sonix is the best online audio transcription software in 2020—it's fast, easy, and affordable.

If you are looking for a great way to convert your audio to text, try Sonix today.

Wait! Before You Go

FREE DOWNLOAD: A deck on Motivating Generation XBOX (your employees who spend all night gaming)