Ep. 019: Sales Rep X.2

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Sales Rep X2:
Usually somebody doesn't move straight in to managing that big of a territory with that many existing accounts with all to also the expectation to open new ones.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
So I was with that company for six months and I opened 15 to 20 new accounts and that's just unheard of. An early 20s guy with no sales experience.

Tracy Neal:
My guest for episode 19 is Sales Rep X.2. Yes. This is our second edition of our millennial series. And today I will interview a millennial sales rep who will remain anonymous. We won't disclose his name or the distributor he works for or the brands he sells. If you're a millennial sales rep who sells beer and you'd like to be my next guest, please contact me on social media. And if you haven't listened to the first millennial interview yet, check out episode number 13. I also want to give a big thank you to all of our subscribers and followers. If you haven't yet subscribe to this podcast, please do and follow us at. iSellBeer Nation on Facebook and Instagram. You can also find me on LinkedIn under Tracy Neal. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did. iSellBeer presents to you, Sales Rep X.

I am not Mr. Lebowski. You're Mr Lebowski, I'm the dude.

Hey, I tell you what, you can take a good look at a butcher's asked by sticking your head up there. But wouldn't you rather take his word for it.

And eat all the frickin chips Kip.

Point. Don't be jealous that I've been shown online with games all day.

We have a pond in the back. We have a pool and a pot plant. A few. Good.

Welcome to the iSellBeer podcast with Tracy Neal, a production for sales reps and distributors who are driving around all day selling beer and the official home of the iSellBeer Nation Facebook Group. And now your host. The 1989 winner of the John M. Studebaker Wheelbarrow Race in Hangtown, California, Tracy Neal!

Sales Rep X2:
Welcome. Sales Rep X.2. I don't know if that's the righ way to call it or not.

Sales Rep X2:
2.0.

Tracy Neal:
2.0. Yeah. Sales of X. Our second version of Sales Rep X. I'm here with Sales Rep X. And you know, the first thing we have to do is establish your fake name. So you have a fake name in mind.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. My name is Allen Williams.

Tracy Neal:
Allen Williams. Would you come up, how did you come up with Allen Williams?

Sales Rep X2:
It's my middle name and then my mother's maiden name.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. And you got that from Sales Rep X1, right?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
He totally made that up on the fly.

Sales Rep X2:
Oh, wow.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X2:
I thought that was a thing that people do when they're trying to think of a fake name.

Tracy Neal:
Well, maybe it is.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
But I mean, my point is he and I didn't talk about that. He just made that up while we were talking. So Alan Williams so we're gonna go with Sales Rep X.2 or 2.0. Right. That's our second version of Sales Rep X and the name we're gonna go with. Alan Williams, I got to look at you and I gotta say. Alan. Alan. Alan. Alan. So that I say Alan throughout.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Throughout the interview.

Sales Rep X2:
All right.

Tracy Neal:
All right. So, Alan, welcome to the podcast. You are a a an almost sales rep, right. In the beer industry. So, first of all, how old are you, Alan?

Sales Rep X2:
Twenty seven.

Tracy Neal:
Twenty seven years old. That would classify you as a millennial.

Sales Rep X2:
Yep.

Tracy Neal:
Right. We have and we have we have sequestered a very nice hotel room here off of a major interstate freeway somewhere in the United States. And I will say a little bit embarrassed. Go into the front desk saying, hey, us two guys need a hotel room only for three hours to record a podcast with a six pack of beer. The six pack of beer. But.

Sales Rep X2:
At 10 a.m..

Tracy Neal:
Yeah, at 10 a.m.. But that's what we did, right. So we're in a nice hotel here. We've got what kind of beer you picked out this beer? It is.

Sales Rep X2:
It's Dogfish Heads, American Beauty, Pale Ale. And they partnered with the Grateful Dead. So it's got me double check on it.

Tracy Neal:
Dogfish Head, American Beauty.

Sales Rep X2:
It's brewed with granola and honey.

Tracy Neal:
Granola and honey. Nice.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
It's got the Grateful Dead bears on the front label? Pretty nice partnership there. And the fall you fall Dogfish Head at all if you read the Dogfish Head book by Sam. Sam has his own book.

Sales Rep X2:
No, I haven't.

Tracy Neal:
By about 10, I say maybe around 2008, 2010, he put out a book,.

Sales Rep X2:
Okay.

Tracy Neal:
Sam, the owner of Dogfish Head. It's a really good book. You should check it out.

Sales Rep X2:
I will.

Tracy Neal:
I had the opportunity to meet him about I think it was earlier this year. Sandia Down Down in San Diego with a Beer Business Daily conference at Intel Dell. He was there. And he's always just a gentleman of a professional. And, you know, a really good guy for us to have in this industry as opposed to having him in any other industry. Yeah. Lucky to have him. He's a great guy. He's got a great brand. And I personally couldn't be happier for what they're doing with Boston beer. Yeah, I've teamed up together for that I think is a great gonna be a great marriage. I think so, too. Good. So, Alan, tell me your role today in the beer business. You work for a beer distributor, right? We're not going to say what city. We're not going to say what brands, where you keep that and anonymity. Again, not because we hope to disparage or talk trash about anybody. We just want you to be free and unknown. Right. So you you're a beer distributorship. What's your role there?

Sales Rep X2:
So I started out as a merchandiser, as most people do.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
And then I've worked for other distributorships in the past. But when I started with this company, they wanted me to start at the bottom and. I told him I was like, I will do this, but you have to promise that when I prove to you my skill and my ability, my knowledge of the industry, that you'll promote me within six months. So they.

Tracy Neal:
How that conversation go? I mean, that's kind of a lie, frankly. That's kind of a bold interview conversation, right?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
I will start at the bottom, but I need to prove myself in six months and I want to get a promotion.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. I.

Tracy Neal:
How the distributor react to that?

Sales Rep X2:
They were surprised and impressed because usually people my age don't come in that confident and making. I do what I say it demands because that sounds mean and kind of cocky, but being confident in their ability and their experience to do what they're hired to do.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So the confidence wasn't just blind confidence, you had that confidence because, as you said, you worked for other distributors. Yes. Tell me a little bit of that. What was your role at another distributorship?

Sales Rep X2:
So my first my first job in the industry, I was a reset specialist and I did a reset for all the major grocery chains. And it was both.

Tracy Neal:
So you're running the computer and looking at, you know, days of inventory and turns and.

Sales Rep X2:
No. So I was more of the grunt worker. I was I would go to every store and actually do the resets with the team.

Tracy Neal:
You laid the white paper in the bottom of the.

Sales Rep X2:
Yep.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
And I did beer, wine and spirits.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
Because the company I was working for at the time had a pretty vast portfolio of beer, wine, spirits and soda.

Tracy Neal:
And there's a lot of research going on in all those sections of the grocery store.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. And and it kept me busy. I was doing it. They were having resets you around.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So that's what gave you the confidence to come in and say, start at the bottom, but I won't work my way up.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. And then I had my first sales position was with a small wine importer and. They put me on a route from. Gosh, it was probably a 300 mile radius. OK. Over 200 accounts, both on premise and off premise, and at the time I was 24, 23, 23, 24 and I was doing a reset. And this guy. He was a sales manager for this company and he said, I like your attitude and you have a lot of knowledge of wine. I'd like to interview you and see if you'd be a good fit for our team.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
And a month later I was hired and usually somebody hasn't moved straight in to managing that big of a territory with. That much existing that many existing accounts with although also the expectation to open new ones.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
So I was with that company for six months and I opened 15 to 20 new accounts and. That's just unheard of. An early 20s guy with no sales experience.

Tracy Neal:
So you had confidence that you could sell a new deal with decision makers and you could find the opportunities at retail within within a year.

Sales Rep X2:
Exactly. Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
So how did you get into the beer business? Go. Let's back up a little bit. You're 27. So nine years ago, you're graduating high school. Right. And what do you do coming out of high school or did you?

Sales Rep X2:
Well, I just kind of worked some odd jobs, whatever I could get. That was able to pay.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
Basic bills of a 18, 19 year old.

Tracy Neal:
And was doing the resets. One of those odd jobs?

Sales Rep X2:
Yes. Yeah. I started doing that when I was about 19.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
And I got in because my dad's been with a major distributor for over 20 years.

Tracy Neal:
So you have family in the business?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
20 years ago at a beer distributorship.

Sales Rep X2:
It's a wine and spirits distributor.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
And Major, I mean, nationwide.

Tracy Neal:
One of the big supplier?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
And he'd started the same as me. He started out doing resets. And then.

Tracy Neal:
So you grew up even like going back to high school years.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
You heard your dad at the dinner table talk about, you know, some new brand coming out.

Sales Rep X2:
Yep. He would do tastings at different retailers and stuff.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So you had a lot of confidence. You knew how this business worked.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. And then my aunt and uncle, they're winemakers.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
So wine has been a big part of my family for as long as.

Tracy Neal:
Winemakers like they own a vineyard?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah, it's a small vineyard like two and a half, three acres, I believe.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
Up in the hills and there. They've been doing it for. A couple of decades as well. Good for them. But it's just a bad family thing. They maybe six or seven barrels per artist, so it's pretty small.

Tracy Neal:
Enough for the family and some close friends?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. And then they enter it into two of the county fairs nearby us. And they get first place every year.

Tracy Neal:
Wow.

Sales Rep X2:
So.

Tracy Neal:
Okay, cool. So yeah. You definitely have in your blood.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
And did you kind of know that in high school or coming out of high school. You know that's the direction I'm gonna go?

Sales Rep X2:
No, no, I. I grew up in the church and I thought I was gonna be a pastor. I was. I wanted to. I was. I'd been playing music since I was a little kid. And I wanted to be at a worship pastor.

Tracy Neal:
A worship leader?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Nice.

Sales Rep X2:
And I was doing that. I was actually on track to do it. But I hated school. And the church I wanted to work at at the time wanted me to get a bachelors degree and then go to seminary. And that just sounded like hell. I did not want to do that.

Tracy Neal:
Have you heard of Lincoln Brewster?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. Oh, my gosh. He's incredible guitar player.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So Lincoln Brewster, I think he's the worship leader at Bayside Bayside Church in Granite Bay, which is in Sacramento where I'm from. I'm from Sacramento. And some of his band mates from 10 years ago when he was touring and becoming the big name are the worship leaders and the head pastors at my local church. Cool. So that's what you thought you were gonna go to. But then the the educational route didn't sound appealing.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
So you pivoted.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. And honestly, I got into doing resets because I just needed a job. I wanted something that was gonna be consistent. But I would also let me serve at my church and do all of that. So with resets, you're working, you know, 4:00 a.m. and you're off before noon.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Yeah.

Sales Rep X2:
Because they want to get all that stuff done before customers kind of start buying their product. So.

Tracy Neal:
Those are early hours.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. Yeah. Which that's also something that set me up to be in the industry, because if I'm used to getting up at 2:00 or 3:00 in the morning to drive an hour and a half. Yeah. To a store starting a sale was right at 5:00 a.m. 6:00 AM.

Tracy Neal:
That was easy. That was easy.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
That's what Sales Rep X.1 said I remember he said he'd moved from chains to on premise and he said he...

Sales Rep X2:
Oh, what a dream.

Tracy Neal:
Sleeping until 7:00 a.m.. Yeah. Because before he was up at 4:30, 5:00 in the morning every day.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. Yeah. And that's. I wish I could say I had that experience when I was doing on premise, but because I was doing on and off premise I still had to get up at 4:00 or 5:00 and start. Yeah. So I was doing on my chain accounts in the morning and then I would go to restaurants and bars in the afternoon in the evenings.

Tracy Neal:
Okay, so you were currently lead merchandiser at your distributorship now? Yeah. You just got promoted today. You're gonna be a sales rep. Yeah. Starting next week, right? Yeah. So what have you learned as a lead merchandiser that you're going to take into the sales rep role? I mean, when you take lead merchandise. Tell me what that day looks like. So I'll do it in a day. How many hundreds of cases pallets.

Sales Rep X2:
I'm hitting between five and eight accounts a day. My responsibility is actually primarily supervising the other merchandisers that are in my area.

Tracy Neal:
Okay, making sure they show up on time and leave the store as it should be.

Sales Rep X2:
Yep. And they making sure they're filling every hole. Sometimes I have to go and retrain some guys because I pop in after they have left a store and I check on their work and I'm like, OK, let's work together tomorrow. I'll shadow you. Yeah. And I'll point out some things that you miss. So it's quality control trying to, you know, beef up our merchandising team. So it's OK because merchandising. Boosts sales, if there's no beer on the shelves, then you can't sell the beer they don't have out. So it's simple, but I have to try to teach these merchandisers that one or two six facts matter if if there's two six packs on the shelf.

Tracy Neal:
Oh yeah.

Sales Rep X2:
Give before because it needs to be stuffed because you're not gonna come in until the next day.

Tracy Neal:
When I was taught to merchandise I was taught you take full cases out to the aisle.

Sales Rep X2:
Yep.

Tracy Neal:
And you bring nothing back. So only room for to six packs. You find another spot behind a competitor's brand.

Sales Rep X2:
Exactly.

Tracy Neal:
Those other two six pack preferrably close to your brand.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Because that way you sell a couple of units before the next guy gets there. And then when he gets there he moves your stuff over and coincidently fully stocks your your your slot for you.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. And then there's the trick. If you have two phases of a product and you have one extra hour, you can do three long ways in the back and then fit six in the front.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Explain that one more time. I think I got you, but I want the listeners to get it. So.

Sales Rep X2:
So you have to facings of a six pack.

Tracy Neal:
Two three by threes.

Sales Rep X2:
Two three by threes. And then.

Tracy Neal:
So you go three by three, three by three, three deep. And then the back you turn them two by two by two.

Sales Rep X2:
Yep.

Tracy Neal:
And go to 4/6 and get him an extra one unit or extra two an unit?

Sales Rep X2:
Extra one unit.

Tracy Neal:
Extra one unit.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. And it's cleaner if you do it in the back. A lot of people get lazy and just do three...

Tracy Neal:
In the front.

Sales Rep X2:
In the front and it looks.

Tracy Neal:
Well yeah. You're not taking advantage of the branding that the brand managers and the suppliers spend a lot of time and money making that front three facing look good on a suspect.

Sales Rep X2:
Right. Yeah. So that's that's not thing I try to teach my guys is, it's more than just putting the product on the shelf.

Tracy Neal:
Do you make him turn the turn the nectar?

Sales Rep X2:
Yep.

Tracy Neal:
That's awesome.

Sales Rep X2:
You've got to make sure the labels are all facing out.

Tracy Neal:
That's awesome.

Sales Rep X2:
Because.

Tracy Neal:
That's good old school right there. All the labels. Labels out even in the six packs.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
You can always tell a good Anheuser-Busch distributor when you go into a store and all the labels are turned out because they've they've made that a core discipline for 30 years.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. And my first boss in the industry, he taught me that.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
And he's been a merchandising manager for 30 years. Great. So I've kind of carried that with me and I try to teach my guys the same thing.

Tracy Neal:
So now you're gonna be a sales rep. Right. And you are a sales rep once before. So it's like before or twice before. It's not exactly new territory. What are you excited about, being a sales rep? And what are you looking forward to next week when you go out and tackle a route?

Sales Rep X2:
I like being. What I love about sales in general is the relationship building because I've always been just a social person. Yeah. My wife gives me crap for it whenever we go anywhere within 100 miles of our house. I see somebody I know and she's like, how do you know that person? And I go and tell her an hour long story of how I met that person, this place. And we've stayed in touch for the last seven years. And so that's why I'd.

Tracy Neal:
So, again, it's like I mean, there's been several episodes. It's all about relationships.

Sales Rep X2:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
The relationship business.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. So that's why I'm really excited about to to use the skills I have with creating and building relationships and then maintaining those for the long haul.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
And everybody loves the beer guy. I mean, I've I've worked in wine. I've worked in spirits and.

Tracy Neal:
Everybody loves the beer guy.

Sales Rep X2:
People didn't respond well when I was pitching a wine stack, but what I mean, when I was working for that company, I was trying to pitch a sack of beer. Oh, heck, yeah. Well, we'll put four stacks out for you. Well, we'll give you an 80 case display of pumpkin beer in September.

Tracy Neal:
Yep.

Sales Rep X2:
Because we know it's going to sell. So I think retailers enjoy working with beer people because they know for sure that the product is going to move as opposed to when I was doing wine and spirits.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Tell me a little bit about that. Because I think, you know, I get a little big. We have some very large wine and spirits, customers using the iSellBeer software.

Sales Rep X2:
Okay.

Tracy Neal:
Although we don't call it iSellBeer we call it CPG Data, our old name. But I think there's a lot of folks on our, you know, listening that don't have exposure to the wine and spirits. But you do. Tell us how what's different about selling wine and spirits versus selling beer. And I think the core thing I look for is the turns, right? How the velocity of how fast the product turns. You know, like you said, when we put up 300 cases of Corona, Bud Light, Coors Light, you know, Sierra Nevada, whatever it may be, we expected to sell through.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
What's the attitude? What's the what are the conversations that take place when you do that with a wine or even even sometimes a spirit?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. The tough thing with doing wine and spirits is it's all from the grocery stores warehouse, whereas with beer it's all DSD. So that's. That's probably the biggest difference between selling wine and spirits versus selling beer and soda. We have a lot more control over what we're selling in beer wise. But with wine, they have to have it in their warehouse getting the sound nice.

Tracy Neal:
I'm opening a beer right next to my microphone to get that pop.

Sales Rep X2:
But yeah, so when when you're trying to pitch a display, you have to convince the buyer or the key decision maker. Look, you already have in your warehouse, just ship it over.

Tracy Neal:
So I guess in wine and spirits, when you sell something, you're not creating a transaction because the transaction is already taking place in a centralized.

Sales Rep X2:
Exactly.

Tracy Neal:
For the chains.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
And when you're selling beer, there's a little bit more of a gratification that, you know, there was a chaching in a transaction that happened. There's some dollars that are going to switch hands. If you don't make that sale, those dollars don't come in exact. Whereas in wine and spirits when sitting in a centralized warehouse of the major changes that do as most parts of the country. Right. And your when you sell something, you're really just transferring it from already owned by that chain in a centralized warehouse. The outlet.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. And that's probably the biggest difference from from my experience.

Tracy Neal:
And a lot of the wine spirits guys call their sales rep sales merchandise, by the way.

Sales Rep X2:
Yes. So they do because the majority of what they're doing is. Pitching displays with the product that they already have on hand.

Tracy Neal:
What I see, what I see across the country and I probably hit at least one distributor per month somewhere in the country, sometimes two or three. What I see is more programs. I'm not going to say it's easier to put on a case, display a line up, but I see more programming towards wine and spirits a little more frequently than you.

Sales Rep X2:
Okay.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. Well, and that's one thing I'm kind of looking forward to going into selling beer again and doing just beer for the first time.

Tracy Neal:
By the way I didn't ask you about your route. Is it chain on premise or independent?

Sales Rep X2:
It's kind of a combination of everything. It's a relief sales position.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
And so I'll probably be covering an on premise route for my first month or a handful of on premise routes for my first month.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
And then I'll hop over to some chains and and do some general market, because that's the natural progression with my company is they want you to merchandise and then do relief sales here, covering everything, every market.

Tracy Neal:
A lot of good training.

Sales Rep X2:
You get familiar with everything. You know how to rotate kegs, which you don't learn when you're merchandising. You learn how to clean lines. You learned all of that stuff on on premise.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
And then you learn how to fight for spots and general market.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
Which is very different from fighting for spots and chains because there's no schematic usually. Yeah, I'm just excited to get my feet in every door. Good. And learn more about the the general market because I had a dip my toe in a little bit when I was working for that wine importer but it was a lot harder to sell imported wine and to add small liquor store.

Tracy Neal:
You know, we used to have a route in Sacramento called the River Route. And the thing about the river out was you could find amazing wines because what would happen would be one of the wine distributor reps would have an incentive to sell in some wine. And they'd oversell a placement of a case or half case of really good wine into some little deli or liquor store along the river. And that was the wrong demographic and it would never get bought. And so one time a manager took me on the river route is back in the 90s. He said, watch, we're gonna go find him. Good wine. And literally we're in the back room dusting off bottles, finding wine that had been naturally cellar in basements of liquor stores. We've been sold in 10, 15 years before just sitting there because it was it was oversold. It should have never been sold in that demographic.

Sales Rep X2:
That is insane.

Tracy Neal:
Kind of crazy. You can relate to that.

Sales Rep X2:
I can definitely relate to that.

Tracy Neal:
When you have a bottle that maybe a 15, 20, 30 dollar bottle that doesn't belong in this liquor store, but you've got an incentive to sell it and sell it in. It sits there at 39.95 Forever and then it moves to the back room and gets put on a back shelf and is naturally seller there for 20 years. And yeah. All the sudden you've got a gem diamond in the rough.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
So, so let's let's talk about being a millennial. Right. So I will tell you at the at the conventions, at the NBWA, the CBBD, which stands for California Beer Beverages Distributors, they go to when we go to Beer Business Daily. When we go to beer marketers insights, all these conventions, all these conferences, one common theme topic is the challenge of a distributor. Just call senior leaders. Sometimes its owner sometimes is senior management, but senior leaders, you know, mostly over the age of 55. And their challenge with millennials. Right. And I've come to learn from talking to a few millennials that it's really just it's a different world. It's a different mindset. It's a different approach approach to a career. It's an approach to work life balance. It's a different approach to family and friends.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
So what are some of the core values that you think are important that make you part of that millennial group? What's important to you as it relates to having a job or having a career?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. So for a long time I was trying to find a career that I could stick with for a long time.

Tracy Neal:
That's what your dad did?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
That's kind of what my dad did, too. Right.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
That's what we're taught is loyalty is rewarded.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. And.

Tracy Neal:
That's not true, by the way.

Sales Rep X2:
No. Yeah. Because I. There's a lot of very grumpy 60 year old men working in the same position they've been in for 30 years and they're not happy. And I've I've met a handful of them. And it's that's not something that I want to look forward to. I kind of see myself hopping from company to company and using the experience from that past company for this new one and giving everything I have for that season and then transferring it to the next company and giving everything I learned from there and just continuing to.

Tracy Neal:
How long is a season to you? Is it one year, three years, five years?

Sales Rep X2:
I'd say three to five years.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
Because that gives me enough time to develop develop the relationships that I need to do a good job. And to sell what I need to sell and to improve myself. It's hard because I. I don't like the term millennial. I don't like calling myself one. But I know that I am some trying to purge some of that.

Tracy Neal:
What is it about the millennial term that you don't like? You're obviously uncomfortable like saying part that doesn't apply to me.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. Well.

Tracy Neal:
That part doesn't to you.

Sales Rep X2:
I will say that it applied to me a lot when I was in my early 20s.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Your ripe old veteran of 27. You've aged considerably in the last 23 and a half months.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. Well, I think I. I was hearing a lot of the baby boomer generation talking crap about millennials and saying they're lazy, they're entitled. All the cliche things you hear about millennials. I was like, sure, I'll take that criticism. That applies to a lot of us. That applies to me a lot of the time. But I want to change that. I want to be a part of the millennial generation, but not fit into that stereotype. So that's why I went in when I interviewed for this and interviewed initially for the company. I'd went in super confident because that's not how I was when I was in my early 20s thinking I'm just going to go in and put my hands out and say, what will you give me? I'm here. I can work. Just give me a job. But now I go in with more confidence, which isn't really a stereo, isn't necessarily part of the millennial generation. It's like stereo typically, it's entitlement and a bad work ethic and expecting the world.

Tracy Neal:
What's important to you in your non-work hours of your life? I think that's a millennial insight I'd like to understand better.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Because it's changing over the last 30 years. Right. So when you think about what you do when you're not at work, what's what are the sacred things that when you look at a job, whether it's gonna be the one you have now or in jobs, you think yourself going to make sure it doesn't impede on this because this is important to me.

Sales Rep X2:
Well, personally, I I play in a band. I play. I play the drums in an indie rock band, a little three piece band and I want to be able to have time to play shows to go in the studio and record an album.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
I want that flexibility so I don't want to be working. Ten or 12 hours a day, consistently without the thought of ever taking any time off or.

Tracy Neal:
Because your music's important to you. So do you own a truck?

Sales Rep X2:
I have a Subaru Baja which had a small little bed and stores all my drums. I have.

Tracy Neal:
A Subaru Baja, is that I like, the kind that's like a half truck, half car?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah, it's an outback with a bed.

Tracy Neal:
So it's like a used to call as a brat.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
That's a super brat?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. That was back in the 70s.

Tracy Neal:
80s.

Sales Rep X2:
80s. Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
In fact you used to have the Subaru Brat and I know right now there's a listener just laughing his butt off right now because somewhere out there there's a 56 year old guy who owned a Subaru brat in high school.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
The Subaru brat actually had seats in the back of it in the bed with seat belts.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
And little handlebars that came up vertically on either sides of your thigh so you could hold on. Yeah. And I knew a guy in my neighborhood who replaced the handlebar grips which were like basic Subaru with Oakley 3s. Oh wow. May not know what Oakley 3s are. But here's the deal. Before Oakley was this worldwide sunglass and goggled company. Oakley was a grip company for BMX.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah, I know that.

Tracy Neal:
And yeah, the only the only one and the Oakley two were kind of like, you know, the ribbed and the spiral. And then Oakley 3 was almost like, you put your hand in a can of clay and it just fit. Perfect. It was just like this perfect hand mold. I'll never forget this guy up the street from where I lived in the 80s had Oakley 3s on his vertical hand, grips in the bag with Subaru Brat. So now they call Subaru a what?

Sales Rep X2:
A baja.

Tracy Neal:
A baja.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
I like the brat better.

Sales Rep X2:
Me too.

Tracy Neal:
Go back to Brat. Bring back the brat.

Sales Rep X2:
There's been rumors about them coming back out with a new model of because they stopped making the Baja 0 6, which is the year of my Baja.

Tracy Neal:
And you told me you owned another Subaru, right?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
So you have two Subarus?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
You know. There's something special about Subaru people. There's something unique. I don't know if it's special, but yeah, super people are Subaru people.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Why? What makes you a Subaru guy?

Sales Rep X2:
They're incredibly reliable. They can go three hundred thousand miles as long as you're doing oil changes. They're super long lasting like a Honda or a Toyota, but they're like second tier as far as luxury.

Tracy Neal:
So this is interesting. Twenty seven year twenty seven year old millennial owns two Subarus. I'm glad this came up, because I've always thought super brand people like I don't own a Subaru. I don't think I'd ever buy a Subaru. Honestly, I mean, I'd say I don't. I don't dislike Subaru's. I'm just thinking like Subaru is not my brand. You know, it's not for me. But I have a friend who owns a Subaru dealership and kills it. He kills it. And in the Sacramento foothills where I live, it's on the way, this place on South Lake Tahoe. So something. Oh, you know, people like the Subarus because the all wheel drive and have you go to Tahoe. So, yeah, crazy.

Sales Rep X2:
And then a lot of people use have Subaru's up in the Pacific Northwest too.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X2:
I mean.

Tracy Neal:
Yep.

Sales Rep X2:
I have friends. Brian visited Portland and they saw everybody driving Subarus and they just loved the Portland culture. So they went home, bought a Subaru within the next month. Oh no. Cool thing about Subaru is they're very philanthropic. They they support half a dozen charities. So they're and they're very vocal about it.

Tracy Neal:
So why is that important to millennials? I'm curious because that's good to call it the why. Right? Simon Sinnett calls it your why or your purpose. And it's just I'm not saying it's bad. It's just different than the way I grew up. Because when I grew up, there were charities and they lived in this box over here and they did their thing. But now it's like millennials want charities to be an interwoven fabric of their career, their job, their life, purpose, everything they do.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Tel me why that's important.

Sales Rep X2:
Well, the millennial generation is just we're a lot more empathetic.

Tracy Neal:
Is it because you can see all the poverty in the world through YouTube?

Sales Rep X2:
It's yeah, it's way more visible now than it was back in the 80s and 90s because of social media and everything. Our parents lived through and suffered from the crash in 0 8.

Tracy Neal:
So the crash in 0 8. It's funny that you say our parents lived through it. I guess I'm one of them. But yeah, we were there.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. So it's.

Tracy Neal:
I laughed because we used to call the crash of 1933. Right.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Now there was a young guy calling it the crash of 0 8.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. And it's I think it is very up close and personal for us. So I think. The big part is just.

Tracy Neal:
How did that crash says about how how old were you when you've been.

Sales Rep X2:
Seventeen.

Tracy Neal:
Seventeen. How did that affect your family?

Sales Rep X2:
Sixteen, 17. We fortunately, we didn't get foreclosed, but we had to refinance our home three times within like seven years or something crazy.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Which means you just paying a ton a ton of interest and not actually making any headway against the poor.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Right.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Had it been tough for your parents? Here you go. You get ready to graduate high school.

Sales Rep X2:
My thought was I'm never going to buy a house.

Tracy Neal:
I'm never gonna house.

Sales Rep X2:
I'm never going. I never want to. I'm never gonna be able to. And.

Tracy Neal:
Why would you want to?

Sales Rep X2:
Why would I want to?

Tracy Neal:
Why would you not want to?

Sales Rep X2:
Because of the fear of losing it.

Tracy Neal:
The risk.

Sales Rep X2:
The risk involved locking into 30 years. I mean, that's something that I think is characteristic of a millennial. Is that like super long term commitment on anything?

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X2:
Is scary. And specifically with me, with my personality. The the only thing that I've committed to and enjoyed and fought for is my marriage. Everything else.

Tracy Neal:
That's interesting is the way you describe it. I've committed to I've fought for and I've enjoyed my marriage.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Why is that important to you?

Sales Rep X2:
Because.

Tracy Neal:
You obviously have a good woman.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. She's fantastic. I don't deserve her. She's wonderful. But I come from a divorced family. Both both of my grandparents on both sides were divorced. My mom and dad got divorced. My step mom and my stepdad got divorced.

Tracy Neal:
Oh, wow. So you've been through a lot of divorce.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
So as a result of that.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Which is worth fighting for.

Sales Rep X2:
Absolutely.

Tracy Neal:
Interesting.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah, I mean.

Tracy Neal:
I'm not disagreeing with you. I just think it's an interesting observation.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
My marriage was fighting for as well. I should say that at least my wife listens. I love you, Shelley. She's the best. She's amazing. Absolutely worth fighting for.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. So that's that's the one thing that is. It's not easy, but it's worth it. I mean, when you're blocking into a 30 year home loan, that's a huge commitment. And you don't know if you're gonna be in that region for the next 10 years, five years. So that's one thing that I think millennials are known for, is moving around and wanting to experience new places, new things, you know.

Tracy Neal:
Experiences over and over materials.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah, material things.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. You know, my parents were raised with. You're going to buy a couch. Buy the best couch. So it last your whole life.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
I know. For me on this. That's like the handcuffs.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Last thing I want is a couch is gonna last my whole life.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Look forward to it. Where you know, six or eight years. I got another one.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Because I'll be sick of it by then.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. And I think that's kind of my sentiment when it comes to career movement is not that I'll get sick of something but that all learn everything that I want to learn. I want to have the control over my career and what I'm doing and where I'm going. And I kind of set myself I give myself a few goals of what I want to achieve within this company, achieve those goals. And I take it to the next company and I achieve goals there. And they just keep moving around because not only do I like the experience and learning new things from the way different people do business, but I'm also meeting people. Like I said in the beginning, I value relationships more than anything. How much of your work world is is part of your personal world? I'd say it's like 40 percent of it.

Tracy Neal:
So if you invite 10 people over for a barbecue on Saturday, four might be from work and six might not be.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Yeah. Do you think that's normal? Abnormal, high low?

Sales Rep X2:
I think it's about normal.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
From my experience.

Tracy Neal:
What are some things that frustrate you? With the baby boomer generation in the workplace, you've got a national platform here.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
You could fix every baby boomer in 30 seconds. Right. What do you to let them know?

Sales Rep X2:
So resistant to change.

Tracy Neal:
Resistant to change?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
I think.

Tracy Neal:
Do you think they're resistant to change because of the sake of change or do you think they sometimes honestly believe that the way things are being done is the right way to achieve success?

Sales Rep X2:
Yes. And I'm not so naive to think that that's not the case because they've. Had they have way more life experience, had more work experience. They know what works and what doesn't. But I think there's something to say about new ideas and giving them a chance because the world is changing so much faster now than it has in the past.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. So hold on him and put my microphone down to run over to the fridge. Here we go, I'm bringing you one, even though you're probably an hour before you even get to it. By the way, the first episode I ever did with beers was Sales Rep X. I don't I don't know why I never thought to do this with beers. I was just trying to be super ultra professional on how we got this.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
And Sales Rep X 1 said, hey, let's have beers.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Cause you said you said, how do you do a podcast without having a beer? So.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah, one of the first podcasts I started listening to. I know. Listen to anymore because I don't agree with much of what they do and what they talk about. I'm kind of grown and changed a little bit, but every episode they would have a beer or three and they'd talk about the beer that they're drinking. And then they'd go,.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. There's a lot of there's a lot of podcasts out there trying to review beers, you know.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
When I set out to create this podcast, all the things I said, as I said, I don't want to go over trends. Right. Because I think that, you know, beer business daily and beer markers inside of the two, you know, I've followed them for 25 years. Yeah, I know Benj and I know Harry personally. They do a much better job at it. I could never sit here and start talking about the trend of DOS Equis an up or down or yo Modelo or Miller Lite or whatever. That's not what I do. I don't know.

Sales Rep X2:
That's not interesting.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah, it's not interesting to me. It's interesting in the moment, but it fades away. It's got an expiration date. That's a fairly quick.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. But if you're talking if you're having conversations with people and it's a little bit more personal. Yeah. That will stand the test of time. Yeah. People can go back and listen to your catalog

Tracy Neal:
This is an evergreen content.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. There we go.

Tracy Neal:
This is evergreen content which means three years from now this is relevant.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
You may or may not like it, but it's relevant to.

Sales Rep X2:
Yes. Right.

Tracy Neal:
Relevant conversation. Speaking of everything, content, relevance. You said that you listened to the last podcast I did, which was.

Sales Rep X2:
About incentives.

Tracy Neal:
I called it Power Talk.

Sales Rep X2:
Power Talk incentives.

Tracy Neal:
So I made that up. So here's here's what happened. I had a guy scheduled to do a podcast and he flaked on me and cancelled. And here I am, you know, two weeks and two days without a release. Nothing at all. I got to get another guy to get another episode out there because the listeners start emailing me when I don't.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
And I want to keep the listenership were growing, you know, the thousands and thousands of listeners. I want to keep that strong.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
So I thought, you know what? I'm just gonna do a power talk. I made up the name and I thought, you know, what do I know better than anything like my subject matter, expertise and incentives. I've spent many years on the other side, the table of distributor writing incentives, good, bad, ugly and whatever I thought I could talk about. So you listened to it, did you? Did you like it? Did you learn anything from it?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. So the what you said. I. I can't remember. I was driving so I couldn't take notes.

Tracy Neal:
Well, I don't even know what I said at the end. You're gonna have to remind me.

Sales Rep X2:
So you said there were like four or five things to remember.

Tracy Neal:
Oh, the five components of an incentive. Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. The tools is the biggest thing.

Tracy Neal:
The tools. Okay. I think it was number three.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. Yeah. And then the follow up is also pretty important because I think for my generation, accountability is really important. You know, checking in on your team on how they're doing. If they're low, you give them encouragement, say, hey, you can do better. I know you have it in you. Here are some extra tools. Is there anything else that you think you would need to achieve this goal? After doing great. Give them an a boy and say good job. Yeah. Keep it up. But I think the tools is really important. You need the right P.O.S..

Tracy Neal:
Tools are always important.

Sales Rep X2:
You need the you need to be educated on the brand that you're trying to hit. The incentive for.

Tracy Neal:
As well as its positioning.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Why? Why is it a dollar less than a competitor? Or why is it a dollar more than the key competitor?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah, absolutely. And I think one thing I learned from working in wine is people love a good story about the brand. People love to hear a good story about the specific label. Like, why did you choose this label for this brand?

Tracy Neal:
I agree. I agree. In fact, you know, I don't I don't drink a ton of wine. I'm probably a 10 to 12 bottles per year kind of guy. My wife does drink anyone, so I'm probably 10 to $12 per year. And I'd say six or eight of them are in the fourth quarter. Right. So I don't drink a lot of wine. But where I live in Sacramento, we have the foothills of Napa to the west, into the east, we have the Noma, Shenandoah Valley and Plymouth and stuff like that. Yeah. And I'm actually a member of three different wine clubs where I get a key supporter of wine.

Sales Rep X2:
Nice.

Tracy Neal:
And my wife. My wife gives me a hard time because she says, you know, you don't drink a lot of wine, but we always have. With three cases here, and my answer is yes. But here's why. When we get invited to a barbecue or a dinner and it's appropriate to take a bottle of wine, I feel like I need to be able to talk about what I'm handing that person. Yes, absolutely. And the only ones I know how to talk about in the grocery store are the 40, 50 dollar bottle ones. And I don't want to spend 40, 50 bucks every time.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
But if I join these wine clubs, are you learning? I get $20 bottles, wine for 12 or 13 bucks. I learn about them. I meet the winemaker. I go to the tasting room. I meet the tasting guy or the tasting gal. I go down. I do some barrel samples. And then that allows me when I go to a dinner and I hand over a bottle of wine. Even though it only costs me twelve or thirteen dollars because I'm in the wine club, I have a story. And I could say I've been here. I've done it. I know. And it makes me more proud to provide a bottle of wine as opposed when I go the gross store. I'm in a rush and I'm in a hurry. And I don't know anything about it. And I want the $999 one. I don't want to be cheap. So in Italy, I'm walking out with a twenty nine ninety nine or thirty four point thirty or a bottle of wine for a casual friend that is going to end up on the back bar and probably not even drink or recognized by them at the party.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
So.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah, I think the the story is very important.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X2:
In my book.

Tracy Neal:
Same with beer.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
It's the beer story too.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. You think people identify more with a brand when they know a funny or a touching story about that brand or about that label.

Tracy Neal:
I'll give you a good one. I just visited I was in Fort Collins, Colorado, by the way. Amazing city,.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. I haven't yet to visit, but I plan on.

Tracy Neal:
Oh you need to go. And I went to I did a tour of the New Belgium Brewery.

Sales Rep X2:
Wonderful.

Tracy Neal:
Did you know that each year that you get hired, everyone gets hired in 2019, in 2020 on your one year anniversary? You get a bike.

Sales Rep X2:
Oh, that's cool.

Tracy Neal:
You get a bike and everybody gets the same bike for that year.

Sales Rep X2:
Wow.

Tracy Neal:
So as you go out front of the brewery and you look at the bike rack, maybe I'll try and get somebody to send you. I should have taken a picture of the bike rack when I was there. But somebody out there is going to picture the bike rack. We'll send around. We'll put up on Facebook and Twitter. But there's a bike rack and you can see all the different styles of bikes.

Sales Rep X2:
From every year, wow!

Tracy Neal:
From every year. And it creates a bit of a of power ranking.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
You see that old yellow one from '99 and you're like wow that's the '99 Fat Tire bike.

Sales Rep X2:
That's cool.

Tracy Neal:
You know it's got this. And they're very you know, as you can imagine these are custom-made bikes.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Flat tire New Belgium, they've got a lot of personality, a lot of creativity, a lot of craftsmanship and artisan behavior there. These are not just basic run of the mill bikes. They're very customized. Very cool.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
There's a little bit different and drastically different from the year before. Different colors, different ones. Got baskets and bells and everything is really kind of cool. It's kind of cool to look at the bike rack out front, a new Belgium to. That's the history of everyone that's ever been hired here. That's working here.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. And that makes me want to go buy a six pack of new Belgium beer,.

Tracy Neal:
Does it?

Sales Rep X2:
Because it's because they have a really cool company culture.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X2:
I want to support.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X2:
You know.

Tracy Neal:
I tell you, I kind of be careful because, you know, we're not we support all brands. Right. And I try not to play favorites, although I've got some favorites out there. But I have to say, I was really impressed with the New Belgium tour. You know, I know there's people, listeners that don't sell New Belgium that want to privately hate on them to some degree. You know, I went to Chico State, by the way, so I've got a little bit Sierra Nevada in my blood. Yeah. Grew up in my late teens, early 20s. Sierra Nevada so.

Sales Rep X2:
I little bit, maybe a lot.

Tracy Neal:
I got a lot

Sales Rep X2:
If you went to the chico.

Tracy Neal:
A got a lot of that Sierra Nevada love. But I will tell you, I was really impressed with the new Belgium tour. It was really cool. I was really impressed not only with the tour, but with the lineup of beers that they have. They've got a really good strategy of what's going on. And I'm also learning a lot right now about Dogfish Head. So excited about about that one, too.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
So that'll be the end of my rant. I try really hard not to get on off on brand rant or.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
What's going on in my job is to be neutral. We support distributors who sell all brands of beer.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
I got to kind of keep that.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. Now going back to me, you said you did the tour of New Belgium. I do. That's something that distributors and like sales managers and department managers, they should take their teams on tours of the breweries that are on the incentive. You know, that quarter, I think that will vary. That will be another incentive for them to sell that brand because they can identify with it personally and they can share with their customers the story.

Tracy Neal:
Well, we used to do that, you know. I mean, there used to be a lot of brewery trips as incentives. I know. In fact, I know New Belgium doesn't like crazy. They have sales rules.

Sales Rep X2:
Not not as not as an incentive after you sell the brand. But before you like, when you're gearing up for that quarter to sell that brand.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
Take them on a trip to the brewery so they can learn about that brand from the rep on site.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. I know. Kim. Kim Jordan's done a lot of that. I don't know. I mean, obviously, she can't have 20,00 sales reps across the country. But, yeah, she's been a really good owner of New Belgium. And it shows when you go through that organization. It's pretty cool.

Sales Rep X2:
Nice. Yeah. I mean, I'm just kind of speaking from from my experience and my when I've gotten tours of of different facilities, it's made me more passionate to sell that product.

Tracy Neal:
Have you been at the Dogfish Head Brewery yet?

Sales Rep X2:
No. I haven't even made my way that Far East before.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Okay.

Sales Rep X2:
But I Dogfish is one of my favorite breweries. And one thing I was I was.

Tracy Neal:
You gonna get the book. You've got to get this.

Sales Rep X2:
If there's an audio book. I will get the audio book because.

Tracy Neal:
I'm looking it up for you right now. I don't know if it's audio. I don't know. I know if Sam can read for nine hours. That's that's a long.

Sales Rep X2:
That's why you hire somebody else to do it.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X2:
Because I'm on the road all the time. I prefer audiobooks than just sitting down and reading a book.

Tracy Neal:
I've tried audio books and, you know, I'm good for an hour and a half. You know, most of them are seven, eight, nine hours. And I'm just like, I don't have that attention span. But I'll tell you what.

Sales Rep X2:
It depends on how the book is written. If it's written and more casual way, it's easier to listen to on audio. But if it's just a bunch of information, then it's really hard to soak in the information. And, you know,.

Tracy Neal:
So so Sam's book is called Brewing Up a Business. Adventures in beer from the founder of Dogfish Head Craft Brewery.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah, shoot me a text that link.

Tracy Neal:
I'm going to guess this is like 2010 because I think I bought it in 2011, 2012 when it first came out. But it's it's got to be at least eight or 10 years old.

Sales Rep X2:
Okay. I don't see a wait format here. I'm looking at an Amazon format audiobook.

Tracy Neal:
Oh, right on. 9.79 Or one credit on audible.

Sales Rep X2:
Perfect.

Tracy Neal:
Have you listened to any podcasts that are like fictional entertainment documentaries or anything like that?

Sales Rep X2:
Oh, yeah. Well.

Tracy Neal:
Tell me some good podcasts that you listen to that are cool because I've got a couple myself I'm excited about. I'm in the middle one right now. I can't I can't put it down. In fact, I've got a two hour drive this and I can't wait to get in the next three episodes,.

Sales Rep X2:
So. Fictional ones. Not necessarily, but have you listened to the serial podcast?

Tracy Neal:
Oh, I have. I did. Episode one about the murder of the young girl in Maryland.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. It was Adnan.

Tracy Neal:
Yes. Yes.

Sales Rep X2:
That best series. the best podcast series. It's.

Tracy Neal:
Every episode. I was like, he's guilty. He's not guilty. He's guilty. Not guilty. He's. He's not guilty. Yeah. So that was called. It's Serial American life.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. This is this American Life is a production from NPR. So NPR's like the main company and then This American Life has their own story.

Tracy Neal:
If you did that one, did you do S-Town?

Sales Rep X2:
I haven't done that S-Town yet.

Tracy Neal:
I'll do it. You got to do S-Town.

Sales Rep X2:
I will put it on my.

Tracy Neal:
You gotta do S-Town.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So you're out there and you wanna listen. A good podcast. It's a documentary. I don't think it's fictional. I think it's true.

Sales Rep X2:
Okay.

Tracy Neal:
It's called S-Town.

Sales Rep X2:
All right.

Tracy Neal:
Fascinating.

Sales Rep X2:
So a lot of podcasts I listen to I don't listen to a lot of fictional stuff. If I do, it's like commentary on a, you know, a TV show or a book. Like I listen to a podcast called Binge Mode.

Tracy Neal:
Binge Mode. What's it about?

Sales Rep X2:
They do episodes based on this last one they did was on Game of Thrones. The whole, you know, episode by episode commentary on the episode.

Tracy Neal:
Binge Mode, huh?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah, no. It's sponsored by Bud Light, too.

Tracy Neal:
Oh, really?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
That's interesting. Beer guys get in on the podcast sponsorship. I tell you what, podcasts are awesome.

Sales Rep X2:
It's the new era of media.

Tracy Neal:
I've been. There was a podcast that this too is not even available anymore. And it was called Elsa in Everyday Life. And it was about the LSAT, which is the the entrance exam to getting into law school. Mm hmm. Which at one point in time I thought would be something that I might do. So I listened to it and it was awesome. But I have I have saved those on my phone. You can find on iTunes in my home from 2005, 2006, when podcasts were first starting before before Joe Rogan started the podcast.

Tracy Neal:
Here's the crazy, stupid thing. Like I'm listening to podcasts in 2005, 2006 and I launch a podcast in 2018. What took me 12 years? Yeah, I honestly I didn't think I had anything to say. And, you know, maybe listeners right now sound like you really don't have anything to say. Maybe I still don't have a thing to say. I don't know. But I mean, I did the whole social media. I mean, I have a confession. I've tried to use Instagram like 20 times. I can't figure it out. I've tried and tried and tried to use Instagram. I don't get it. It doesn't work like Facebook. It doesn't work like LinkedIn. Too old to figure it out, but I'm still trying. My kids run like crazy. And somebody told me, you got to get on social media. You got gotta get iSellBeer on social media. So I know what you mean. They said you should do a podcast. Listen. What would it what would I talk about? I don't have anything to talk about. Yeah, maybe I still don't. But then let's get thousands of listeners now. It's a pretty big deal.

Sales Rep X2:
You lucked out with the format of how you structured the podcasts because you're interviewing people.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep X2:
You're having conversations with people. So as long as you keep booking interesting people myself excluded from that.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Have we had that today?

Sales Rep X2:
I don't know.

Tracy Neal:
I don't know either. We'll see what the ratings of this episode come up to. But just. But if you're booking interesting people, then you don't really have to do a whole lot. You just have to ask the right questions. And then the person interviewing.

Tracy Neal:
I'll tell you how I came up with the idea. There's a guy there's a guy named John Kane from Central States. Well, so John Kane and I have been pitching John Kane on the iSellBeer platform, our software, for about five years. And I've gotten to know John really well. He's a great guy. And we ran into each other at breakfast one time at Caesars at the end BW A probably two years ago. And honestly, I was just tired of pitching it. I was tired of selling to him. And we end up sitting at the same table, have coffee and a bagel together. And I thought to myself, I don't want to pitch this guy again because it's just it's going nowhere. We're not getting any success. You know, John Kane now, a very good friend of mine. And I said to myself, I just wanna know what makes this guy tick. So I asked him, I say, John, tell me, what was your first day on the job like? And he told me the most fascinating story. No, he hasn't been on the podcast yet, so I'm not going to spoil it.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
I'm I'm saving him for like my 100th episode.

Sales Rep X2:
Oh, nice.

Tracy Neal:
But he told me the most fascinating story and it clicked. I go, wow, every guy in this industry has a story like that that they're eager to share the story to tell. That's the interviews that I'm. Those are the interviews I want to do. Yes. Your first day on the job and go out and find some of the veterans out there. And it's.

Sales Rep X2:
And that's unique.

Tracy Neal:
And it's been really cool.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
And I've even gotten a lot of e-mails from people not in the industry who are in, you know, sales doing copiers and insurance and pharmaceuticals, stuff like that. Email me said, hey, it's pretty cool.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Hopefully we're continuing that.

Sales Rep X2:
I think so. Yeah,.

Tracy Neal:
Well, Allen, I have thoroughly enjoyed this. By the way, you're still a half a beer behind. I've got three empty bottles. You've got two and a half empty bottles. It's been a it's been a great hour or so. And we want to thank Sam and Dogfish Head for this American Beauty.

Sales Rep X2:
And we want to thank the Grateful Dead. Also, if anybody hasn't seen the Grateful Dead is new band Dead End Company with John Mayer.

Tracy Neal:
Dead End Company?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
It's a real band, that's out on touring?

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. So Dead End Company is the Grateful Dead. But John Mayer is filling the role of remember his name, but their other guitar player singer that passed away years ago. He's fronting the band with Bob Weir and deadend company. Yeah, I saw them at a big amphitheater a month after I got married. My wife and I went because we're both huge John Mayer fans. And it was pretty insane. It was like stepping into a time capsule, walking into the 70s.

Tracy Neal:
Awesome. And we've been married again?

Sales Rep X2:
Three years as of yesterday.

Tracy Neal:
Excellent. Well, I'm going to hold you to one thing, and that's as you as you said, you're gonna fight for your marriage.

Sales Rep X2:
Yep.

Tracy Neal:
Two years from now. Five years now, 10 years from now, 20 years now. I'm gonna say, Chris, you still fight for your marriage.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Because I know that's what's what's important.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah, we'll stay in touch. Keep me keep me accountable on that.

Tracy Neal:
It's good to have a God loving man on the podcast and in the industry. So thank you, Chris.

Sales Rep X2:
Yeah. Thank you.

Tracy Neal:
Take care.So what's the best tasting beer in America? Who cares? That's for the consumer to decide. And until they do, you will keep selling them new brands every day as a distributor sales rep. You can become a part of the iSellBeer Nation by subscribing to this podcast and using the #iSellBeer in all your social posts. Also, be sure to join the iSellBeer Nation Facebook Group and visit our website. Our industry is an up and down the street business where local relationships matter. I want to thank you for making me part of your day and wish you good luck on the objectives for your next account call. In fact, I know you're gonna crush it.

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