Ep. 020: Nasser Alimusa, the Big Nastro

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Nasser Alimusa:
I was always one of the guys who really liked the fun incentives.

Tracy Neal:
Do you prefer trips and prizes or cash?

Nasser Alimusa:
I like trips and prizes. That way I can hide the money from significant others. And I don't have a lot of married guys. I don't want my. That's where I learned the term momma money.

Tracy Neal:
Momma money?

Nasser Alimusa:
Momma money, because your incentive check went on your paycheck and moma took your money. So momma can't take your trip. Momma can't take your prizes. So I always remember some of the older guys timing that like, hey, you don't want, you know. Yeah, you make my own money, but you always want that cool trip money for that trip prize.

Tracy Neal:
My guest for episode number twenty is Nasser Alimusa. Now, Nasser and I go back about 15, 18 years. He's worked at several distributorships across Northern California and he's even worked at a couple suppliers. Nasser is one of the greatest guys I've ever met in the beer business. He's sincere. He works hard and he loves selling beer. Nasser recently drove up to the iSellBeer headquarters and he's sitting with me here in the office. We're actually recording it by video so we can put this on YouTube. I hope you enjoy this as much as I do. I sell beer presents to you, Nasser Alimusa.

I am not Mr. Lebowski. You're Mr Lebowski, I'm the dude.

Yeah, I tell you what, you can take a good look at what was asked by sticking your head up there, but wouldn't you rather take his word for it?

Film and eat all the frickin chips. Kip.

A point. Don't be jealous that I've been shown online with games all day.

We have a pawn in the back pool and upon a good.

Welcome to the iSellBeer podcast with Tracy Neal, a production for sales reps and distributors who are driving around all day selling beer and the official home of the iSellBeer Nation Facebook group. And now your host. The 1989 winner of the John M. Studebaker Wheelbarrow Race in Hangtown, California, Tracy Neal!

Tracy Neal:
All right, Nasser. Welcome to the podcast.

Nasser Alimusa:
What's up, Mr. Tracy?

Tracy Neal:
Good to have you here. It's been a while. We've got our beers here and. All right, iSellBeer koozies, I'm gonna an open mind.

Nasser Alimusa:
It's very delicious today. Thank you so much. I got sprayed.

Tracy Neal:
I sprayed you. Sorry. And you already opened yours. I was saving it for the soundbite.

Nasser Alimusa:
I was thirsty. Just got home from a trip. I needed some bounce out.

Tracy Neal:
So we're doing a first here, by the way. Not only are we recording a podcast and we're doing it in iSellBeer worldwide headquarters here in Eldorado Hills, California. But we're also filming it for potential YouTube. I mean, Kevin, our creative manager, said, you know, why don't we just roll some cameras and stick this up on YouTube and go full Joe Rogan.

Nasser Alimusa:
I like it in. And home of Eldorado Hills is the most famous bar of Eldorado Hills. You've told me many times the Purple Place.

Tracy Neal:
Purple place. Yes.

Nasser Alimusa:
Gotta love that spot.

Tracy Neal:
Yep. So. Nasser, I've known you for quite a long time. We've become really good friends over our beer career. iSellBeer Nation does not know you yet. So my job over the next hour or so is to introduce you and get some knowledge and experience and great tips on what it means to be in the beer business. So as of right now, you are you know, you're working for a wine and spirits supplier.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yep.

Tracy Neal:
Shame on you. By the way,.

Nasser Alimusa:
I know.

Tracy Neal:
Shame on you. But you've left the beer industry. You said you hope to get back into the beer industry by the end of the year. So you're working on a couple of things. We'll see how that goes.

Nasser Alimusa:
We're talking to people. And I want to get back into the beers where I belong. I'm a beer guy. I'm a lifer at heart. You know, people say the grass is greener on the other side. And I found out it's not. So I want to be on my farm.

Tracy Neal:
We say you say it's you're a lifer at heart. How how long have you been in beer business?

Nasser Alimusa:
Officially like being paid by a beer.

Tracy Neal:
Everybody always says that.

Nasser Alimusa:
So honestly, I've been the beer business since as a little kid. I grew up doing this. My dad came here. You know, he's first generation in the US. He opened up his first store I believe in 1976.

Tracy Neal:
What kind of store was it. So your dad immigrated to the United States.

Nasser Alimusa:
Dad came in the U.S. worked as a missionary for two years in Texas. Got enough money, came to California with a backpack and 50 bucks, and end up working at a gas station at good old Rosemead, California.

Tracy Neal:
Where's Rosemead, California?

Nasser Alimusa:
Is smack dab in the middle of like kind of east in between east and Pasadena. Just like what they're famous for, honestly, is it was the first facility of Saroja was built down the street from.

Tracy Neal:
Okay, Saroja.

Nasser Alimusa:
So you look at Saroja bottles, it says Wang Fu come me. Rosemead, California is just down the street from where my dad's first gas station was 1000 karnik by trade and early on in his career. Gas stations are converting mean stores. He worked his way up, bought his first gas station, then then having his first convenience store. And then in 1978, he bought his first big liquor store called Most Liquor. And I was born the same.

Tracy Neal:
Most Liquor? Still there to this day. Walnut California bore walnut and Diamond Bar break and wrote up 57 theboss first liquor store the year I was born. Big, massive liquor store. And I remember as a kid riding my scooter or my little tricycle around the store as a little kid. That's when my first memories of being liquor stores riding around the store. I remember getting in trouble because I rode that little big wheel right into like a 6 lato, 6 foot bottle of K.A. Crack, that thing. I remember that spilling all over the place that wasn't too happy. But.

Tracy Neal:
So did you stock shelves as a kid growing up?

Nasser Alimusa:
I sotck shelves, my first job was my dad hated bending down to get the lower shelves so I have to dust off over the lower shelves.

Tracy Neal:
As a little kid?

Nasser Alimusa:
Little kid, he used to pay me a quarter of case to ring six packs. He's.

Tracy Neal:
Ring six packs. What is ring six packs means?

Nasser Alimusa:
So back in the olden days when I would buy 18, 18 packs even exists, there was twelve packs or suitcases.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Nasser Alimusa:
And they'd buy suitcases because you got a better price on them and then they'd buy rings or you make a deal with the Pepsi guy and.

Tracy Neal:
The classic rings, yeah?

Nasser Alimusa:
The whole six pack rings. So then ring six packs. You make six packs of Budweiser for my dad and I get a quarter of case. That was my allowance.

Tracy Neal:
Nice.

Nasser Alimusa:
So that's how I got in the industry. And it's kind of funny and ironic. My dad never wanted me to get in this industry in a weird happenstance in my family. We've always been a family, very orientated. My sister worked with my mom and my sister. My mom was a county social worker. My sister works for the county family. And I know my brother worked for my dad during his gas station days. My brother's a head airline mechanic for American Airlines. I work for my dad. And the convenience days. I work in the beer industry.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
So it's kind of I always followed that family suit and that's where I'm at today.

Tracy Neal:
Nice. I know you've got a good story about your first day on the job. But before I get before you do that, you talked about your family being down in the you know, it it was called. It's just called Los Angeles area. I know it's not specific, but for people in this country, Los Angeles area is good enough.

Nasser Alimusa:
It's big enough. Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
So East L.A., where there's a farming community and you've got it. You've got a story about your grandfather.

Nasser Alimusa:
No, it's my grand uncle,.

Tracy Neal:
Your grand uncle.

Nasser Alimusa:
My my my grandfather, my grand uncle. They immigrated here from France and they basically split at the Cajon Pass.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Nasser Alimusa:
So Granduncle went towards Tehachapi to raise baby carrots. My grandfather went to UCLA to raise rabbits and he used to sell the fur to the war effort and all the flight jackets he's been.

Tracy Neal:
Wait. Wait slow down, slow down.

Nasser Alimusa:
So there is the baby.

Tracy Neal:
Let me recap get this. You've got it. You've got a grandfather and a granduncle.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
One of them goes to farm baby carrots.

Nasser Alimusa:
Farmland.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. let's do this. I mean, baby carrots or nothing in 1978, 1980. But today in today's environment, I mean,.

Nasser Alimusa:
It's the carrot business. Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Did they patent the baby carrot?

Nasser Alimusa:
They've got. I'm trying to really find out the story because you've always asked me about the baby carrot patent. And it's it's the process of the carrots and the baby carrots and, baby carrots. And then there's cut down carrots. And it's funny because we don't ever really talk to the side of the family like they had a big falling on. And we kind of refound them and and whether the baby carried the baby's hair in that area of the capital. But yeah, my family's got some great history and stories to it that.

Tracy Neal:
Having patented the baby carrot. I mean, that's pretty. Nowadays, nobody ever buys a baby carrot.

Nasser Alimusa:
I want to know if actually there is a real pain. And this is there's some family foreclosure. But I'm going to say we're gonna find out and get back to you on this one.

Tracy Neal:
Well all you know, as you're not getting patent checks,.

Nasser Alimusa:
I am not gaining any money whatsoever. I get baby carrot at Empire. But like I said, I got some weird family stuff. This is you know, there's always family stories about my grand uncle John who shot down his farm on the backside. It was Edwards Air Force Base and.

Tracy Neal:
Edwards Air Force Base?

Nasser Alimusa:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. And that Tehachapi Hill area where.

Tracy Neal:
We're talking the 40s, 50s?

Nasser Alimusa:
This is. Yeah. This is World War Two era.

Tracy Neal:
Word War Two era. Okay.

Nasser Alimusa:
And I mean, literally came over from France on on the boat through Ellis Island and all that. And basically they got here and the stories that my grand uncle John who shot down a plane by accident. Because.

Tracy Neal:
Wait your grand uncle shot down a plane.

Nasser Alimusa:
That's the story that my mother told me. And we've always heard that that.

Tracy Neal:
He's out he's out in the fields.

Nasser Alimusa:
He basically.

Tracy Neal:
He sees an airplane flying over the 40s.

Nasser Alimusa:
And he thought they were zeros because after four of her plan,.

Tracy Neal:
He shot a plane.

Nasser Alimusa:
See a plane crash land because.

Tracy Neal:
It was an American plane with an American pilot from Edwards Air Force Base.

Nasser Alimusa:
I'm probably going to jail for this.

Tracy Neal:
And the guy crash is.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yeah. So that's the family's folklore. So there's a lot of stuff in my family has gone on but.

Tracy Neal:
Meanwhile, the other uncle is out raising rabbits and sign rabbit fur.

Nasser Alimusa:
That's my grandfather. That's that's yeah, he's out in Rosemead, built his farm and Rosemead and raising rabbits. And I remember one time as a kid asked, mom, mom, can we get a pet rabbit? She goes, we will never have a rabbit because of the stuff she had to do on this farm and.

Tracy Neal:
Oh, yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
Oh, yeah. So Gran and my mom says my grandfather was a moonshiner used to make walnut wine,.

Tracy Neal:
Walnut wine. I haven't heard of that.

Nasser Alimusa:
Moonshiner. Walnut wine.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Nasser Alimusa:
So I guess he had the alcohol running through my blood for quite some time.

Tracy Neal:
So let's get to it before we get to your first day on the job. You've worked for a couple of suppliers, right?

Nasser Alimusa:
I work for a couple of suppliers. I've worked for work for Heretic. I work for Heineken. I've had some great success with these companies. I've worked for a distributor which was started out at Hudson Beverage with later became DBI Beverage.

Tracy Neal:
So Hudson Beverage became DBI Beverage.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yep. And then also my family's owned its own store. So I've actually owned a liquor store. I inherited a liquor store at the age of 21.

Tracy Neal:
You inherit. How do you inherit a liquor store?

Nasser Alimusa:
My dad was on vacation. He was back in the Middle East visiting family and in route coming home. He had a heart attack on the plane and he's alive. Don't worry.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Nasser Alimusa:
But I get this call. I'm dressed as a Hooters girl at a at a Halloween party to buy. It's holy night. I'm dressed as a Hooters girl. So picture that. I have a picture of it somewhere else. I'm very I'm dressed as a Hooters girl. I get this calling on my. Holy cow. Hey, if you want to see your dad live and you better get up here to San Francisco, is that San Francisco, Kaiser? Ended up having to have like a quadruple bypass whole craziness. And since I'm the only one who ever worked with my dad in the liquor side of the business, I dropped everything I was doing, dropped out of college, dropped out of my job, came up and started running the liquor store farm during his recovery. My plan was okay help my dad get back on its feet and then go back to school and go back to normal life. Well, two months later, after my dad's kind of recovered and back on its feet, my mom gets bit by a black widow. This is this is a crazy story. She gets bit by a black widow. I'm in Gilroy, California, working for this construction company.

Tracy Neal:
How did she get it? Because I want to make note on how not getting bit.

Nasser Alimusa:
I wasn't there.

Tracy Neal:
I mean, was it in the house? Was she in a barn?

Nasser Alimusa:
I don't know if she got it from the store, in the house or in the backyard or what. But all I know is I'm in Gilroy worked for this construction company and I get this call saying, hey, your mom's in the hospital. They might have to amputate her arm if the swelling doesn't come.

Tracy Neal:
Wow.

Nasser Alimusa:
And I'm like, what? So I literally come back to the store, come back, check out mom, get mom. They're able to, you know, keep the arm and really get the infection under control. And then my parents are basically like, we're getting too old for this. We need help. You know,.

Tracy Neal:
So you ran the store?

Nasser Alimusa:
There's the store and.

Tracy Neal:
You dealt with the distributors?

Nasser Alimusa:
I dealt with distributors. I dealt with grocery guys, the chip guy, the ice cream guy.

Tracy Neal:
All the sales reps.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yeah, pretty much the age of 21. I had a pretty big learning curve on how to do this business. And, you know, I screwed up quite a bit, but.

Tracy Neal:
And now you're 41, 42?

Nasser Alimusa:
Forty, I turn 41 in a month.

Tracy Neal:
Forty. Nice. Okay. So tell me about your first day on the job as a beer distributor?

Nasser Alimusa:
So the first day of my job is the beer distributors. Kind of funny because a is that Hudson beverage? They say show up at 7:00 a.m.. My dad always saw me. Don't be late. You show up 10 minutes early. I'm there at 6:30 in this parking lot. Nobody's there. Drivers are already out. There's always a gap of the distributor between the drivers already out. And then the opposite.

Tracy Neal:
The drivers come in really early.

Nasser Alimusa:
They're out by 5:00 and they're hitting the road. They're they're already gone by 6:00.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Some sit in this parking lot like, OK, I don't know where to go. We said where to go. And I'm sitting out there just kind of waiting and waiting and waiting, waiting for somebody to pull up and wave at them. Hey, I'm here to say my first day five star kind of peeking around. I kind of walked in the warehouse and I find this guy, Keith Jackson, who was the warehouse manager at time. And I think he's still there even to this day. Great guy. He's like, oh, you're the new guy. You go upstairs and meet this gentleman named Bob Christopher. And Bob is one of the first guys ever really get me in this business. And the first day, the first thing he says me. Oh, great. Another one. Then I'm like, awesome. He goes, Well, I'm gonna be training you today. Give me a few minutes. I'm trying to upload your handhelds. When I had this old zion, or zion handhelds that never worked. He wasn't sure how to work. He's an old school pen and paper guy route books. He did not this thing work. He thinks he's got it, doesn't have it. We end up doing our first account, which is just what my dad's liquor store.

Tracy Neal:
Oh, your dad's liquor stores is your first account?

Nasser Alimusa:
The first account I went trhough.

Tracy Neal:
Do you own it at this point?

Nasser Alimusa:
We still owned it. We owned it for about another six days. My dad just so we could just decide to sell it and retire.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Nasser Alimusa:
And it was in the ESCO. And that's why I took the job of the distributor. And the first day I go to my dad's liquor store and my dad's there with the new owners and just razzing the heck out of me. Jess, what's on posed? What's this? What's that? Too much daring to kick me out a couple times. You know the good old adage, get out of my store.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
Basically just being a true ass. But, you know, you gotta love your pops.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
And then I realized that the Zion handheld isn't uploaded. Right. So that was that. So Bob, God bless him, goes. All right. Let's go back. You know, we'll have some A-list cover there. Alex, go back in route. They're going back. I'm going through this crosswalk. And somebody kind of stepped on the crosswalk and I went through the crosswalk because I didn't see him step in the crosswalk.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Nasser Alimusa:
I get pulled over. Okay. Napa P.D. is looking at me and says, hey, before I can say anything. Bob Criswell starts yelling at the guy. So the guy, you know.

Tracy Neal:
So you're driving?

Nasser Alimusa:
I'm driving guy in the passenger seat. My car is sitting next to me, starts yelling at the Napa P.D. guy about how this is like entrapment and everything else to the point. I'm just sitting there getting yelled at by this police officer on my left. This guy on the right. They're arguing with each other and the ticket hit the cop hands me the ticket and says, you should tell your lawyer to shut up. Next time, I was just gonna give you a warning. So I got a I got a hundred and some dollar fine for going through a crosswalk on my first day of the job, how to deal with my dad and my handheld broke and it kept getting worse from there. Day two and three.

Tracy Neal:
Before things turned around. He had a heck of a career on the distributor side.

Nasser Alimusa:
I did. It was honestly the best job I've ever had. I've I've gone to do so many amazing things. I met so many amazing people. Another distributor, Jimi, was probably one of the biggest highlights of my life. Cause you've met you meet so many different people in your life time. Met you, Trace. You know, I met so many great mentors in my life. I've done so many really cool things from it. And even who is some of the great mentors you you've worked with or met in your life?

Nasser Alimusa:
Well, I'm not gonna fail you. But I must say you for for one.

Tracy Neal:
No that question was not. So you could say me.

Nasser Alimusa:
I know, I know, but I know it wasn't. But you've been a great friend, a mentor to me and a great sounding board. There's like there's a John Spicer of the Worlds who now works for PAPS, I believe. You know, he he's. I met him the second day I was there at a sales. Just nothing but a great guy. Greg Meredith, who was the V.P. of blogging, I think he's getting ready to retire, if not as retired.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
Jennifer Glasco for MillerCoors. I mean, the list can go on and on as all these great people. But over the years, I've had so many great mentors of people who've just said, hey, you're being a dumb ass, you know. And back in the day, you know, you made relationships with so many suppliers, people where they weren't afraid to tell you. Hey, you're being a dumb ass. Like, don't do it that way. Do it this way. Work, work. Yeah, work smarter, not harder work. Find the simple way. Don't overthink it. And you know, it's been some really great sounding boards. And like I said, it's just, you know, I've made so many lasting relationships that have carried on that, you know, I always was moved around. I mean, Trevor Straker or Mike O'Hara. There's been so many.

Tracy Neal:
Trevor Straker and Mike O'Hara, great guys. Both of them.

Nasser Alimusa:
There's been some a lot of fun guys. And, you know, they're always down. They have good times where I play fancy football with these guys. And, you know, you expand outside that realm with just co-workers.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
And they become true friends. I mean, that was the best part of it.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. So what was your role at the distributorship?

Nasser Alimusa:
I, my first role?

Tracy Neal:
Sure.

Nasser Alimusa:
My first role was a feet on the street sales rep. I had.

Tracy Neal:
Off premise or on?

Nasser Alimusa:
On a combo route. I had Napa on premise. Some Napa.

Tracy Neal:
Napa, Napa, California, here in.

Nasser Alimusa:
Napa, California

Tracy Neal:
In the wine country.

Nasser Alimusa:
I'm in one country.

Tracy Neal:
And for the poor people that don't know wine country, I'm going to make an assumption here that they might think that it's completely full of wine. To what degree do we sell some beer and wine country?

Nasser Alimusa:
Well, the old adage is 90% of wine, 10% was beer. But honestly, I would say about 70% of everything in the store is beer.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Nasser Alimusa:
Gin up there these days. Beer is really good.

Tracy Neal:
Somebody has to plant the grapes?

Nasser Alimusa:
So there's always this misconception when you sell something, you live in Napa. The thing I'm living in Vineyard and I live in a nice normal city. Napa is a big valley picture, a big V and Napa is at the point of the V and the valleys. The legs.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
And that's Napa Valley. That's where all the wineries are. And that's what makes living in this town so beautiful and great is there's this massive valley, but people have to work there. Yeah. You got a lot of migrant workers that were coming in work in the fields to Ducati, Bud, Coors, you know, the beer the beer consumption back then was crazy, was suitcases. It wasn't even 18 packs. Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Because it's basically a farming commune. I mean before.

Nasser Alimusa:
It's an agricultural community, it still is to this day.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
It really is. It's still a lot of tourism. But without this agricultural business thriving, there's nothing there.

Tracy Neal:
So what it will over some of the things you learned on how to be. Because I know you move from the common route. And then were you on premise?

Nasser Alimusa:
I went from a combo or out. I had I had some really sketchy areas of Vallejo that I sought out the deal because nobody wanted to deal with those guys. And with my family background, though, I had you speak fluent liquor store. We're gonna throw you in there, too.

Tracy Neal:
You speak fluent liquor store?

Nasser Alimusa:
I speak fluent liquor store. And the best piece of advice I can give anybody and everybody has that one owner who wants to argue with you to give this to your listeners, too. Any sales rep? The biggest piece of advice I can tell them is argue back. Okay.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Why?

Nasser Alimusa:
Because the philosophy is this. A lot of these guys work in his liquor stores, own those liquor stores, live in those liquor stores are there. And those liquor stores, 14 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 a year. Right.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
They have some scratchy radio playing in the back with a fan blowing there, not run their AC. So they're kind of miserable people in certain ways. My dad was one of them.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Nasser Alimusa:
So when the sales reps come in, you're there. Entertainment. You're the show for that. You're the half hour, hour long show for the day. You're their entertainment. They don't have TV. You're the show. So that's what they want to go over the orders with you. They want to. They kind of want to grease you a little bit and just kind of give you a little grief because they want. They want that interaction. They don't want to sit there and deal. They have customers coming in all day, but they want some of the converse back with them. And so if they start yelling at you, that's your way of just really to get you to open up, argue back.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
Don't be afraid to kind of give them give them a little jab here in there. And believe me, the quicker you jab at them and the quicker they jab back at you, you make the best relationships. I remember starting with guys and they wanted you to read back the order. Go out of my item and take your whole day. By the time you kind of get with these guys and you you know, you make some jokes with them. You insult them a little bit. They insult you. You know, they throw a pan out you here, in there, whatever your relationships build. So, so much quicker and so, so fast. And you can't explain what the business goes to. Now you have relationships. Now you come in and build displays. You can get handles. You can do whatever you need to do because this business is relationship based. As we all know.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. I remember you were the king of on premise. And as such, I think it was around 2015, 2014, '15 or so when we started doing the tap handle survey.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Right. And I. You were the first one I call is the king of on premise. I said, hey, Nasser I want to come work with you for the day. And we went in to a bowling alley I think was called strikes.

Nasser Alimusa:
Stars, stars.

Tracy Neal:
Stars and we went to this place called stars. And it was right about when we were doing the tap handle survey.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yep.

Tracy Neal:
And so I called you said NASA won't work with you for the day. And he said, sure, you know, I'll help you do this on premise survey. We went out and we walked in the stars and I said, You all right? Yes. Just think out loud. You know, like what you mean. I guess we'll just think out loud. Like everything. Go into your head. Just say it. So we walked in and you said, first thing I'm thinking is there's three bars here in HFS, six tap panels. So I got 18 handles I need to track.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yep.

Tracy Neal:
I've used that story over and over and over when we show the TAP handle survey because in the tap handle survey, the very first screen to come up is how many taps are in this account. And it's a completely useless screen, but it can be overridden and you can be wrong on that number. But what it does is it gets your mindset to where you what you're thinking is paralleling what you're interacting with in the app. And I always credit you with that. This was Nasser's idea. He thought out loud.

Nasser Alimusa:
I didn't said that?

Tracy Neal:
Yes, I think the dividend checks have been lost.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yeah, I mean, I guess I got a beer before it. Yeah, it's just on the mindset because back in the day when I first started, it used to be paying per handle. Hey, you get out headers handle, you get 100 bucks or hundred fifty bucks, 200 bucks. Well then all of a sudden, you know, people are always going to try to bend the rules and say, hey, are you spinning handles or you're actually getting. Are you gaining business? Yeah. So the GM at the time, this guy, Stan Bukowski and Stan told me a lot of.

Tracy Neal:
Good old Stan.

Nasser Alimusa:
Good old Stan. You know he's old school guy. And he really taught me a lot of ways to look at the business differently. And I was credited for him. You know, people say, how do you have your mindset? And he was one of the big people to really show me a mindset. He didn't pay for handle. He paid for market share. What's your share? He goes for 40 percent all day long and all do. And spending handles way in gaining nothing. You're just doing nothing. Yeah. So that's how I start looking at, OK. I should have Ali six up here. I need to have at least four. My goal was always five. Like I hated the competition. You know, I get airway as a bay has a mortgage payment. But in this business, the one thing about the beer to shivery business, it's the only one of the few businesses where you can be an alpha personality and and thrive at it because you've got to be competitive.

Tracy Neal:
Yep.

Nasser Alimusa:
If you don't have that competitive drive, you can't be in this business because the guy who does have it is going to run circles around you. So you have to have it. And, you know, I always say it's the best thing outside of playing sports without love, without the concussions, because you're sitting there every day.

Tracy Neal:
Selling beer.

Nasser Alimusa:
Who am I competing with? Who am I going against? Who's you know? Oh, man. I'm on this area today. I'm going against this rep. He's a good rap. He does this stuff.

Tracy Neal:
With things I used to do to as I would purposely try not to know the names of my competitors because it was easier to say, quote unquote, hate them. Right. I mean, it's if you get to know your fellow beer guy by name and talk to him for a while, you actually kind of fall in love because he's another beer guy.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yeah, you build friendships.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
Let's see. I counter that because there are some guys out there who, you know, at the end of the day would say, hey, Monday through Friday, 6:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Tracy Neal:
Game on.

Nasser Alimusa:
Game on. I'm a shrink wrap in your car to your pal Jack or a hand truck to your car just to keep you slowing down. I mean, we did some bad jokes to each other, but after that, you know, you can go meet up and have a beer, go play a round of golf. These guys, because they understood, too, to it's competition. Yeah, it's not. Hey, I'm trying to make you homeless. It's just hey, I'm trying to make my dollars to feed my family do there. But I understood that there was competition. You know, it's just who's better? Who's who's the biggest, baddest kid on the street. And that's what you want to strive for.

Tracy Neal:
What were some of the tips and tricks that you could pass on that you learned in sign in the on premise?

Nasser Alimusa:
The biggest thing I can tell anybody as you're as you're gotten into this or if you're already into this, is have a notepad on the at all times. And it's not making notes about like. Oh, yeah, this date or that. Make a note on what your buyer's name. You understand his name. Understand his habits. Hey, he's here between seven and ten, but he does his banking from seven to eight. He does know their schedules, know their times. Don't be afraid to ask. Mike, hey, when do you want me to come in? Because that way, if you come in when he's expecting you, he's in a much better mood. If you're not surprising him, he knows you're coming. Like I said earlier. You're his entertainment from 9:30 and 10:30. That's your time slot. You're in there. You get his undivided attention. You know his name. You know his likes. Don't be afraid to ask him his name and remember it. Well, of people go, hey, what's your buyer's name? I don't know the guy with the glasses, the grumpy old guy in the back. Well, maybe he's grumpy because you know those damn name. So it's always kind of like I would sell people a couple of things. Remember the name? Have your pricing. You know, study your pricing. So, you know, you're talking about. So you don't like. Hey, let me put on my pricing.

Tracy Neal:
A lot of do a lot. I mean, when I used to sell on premise, we would talk about cost per ounce. Is that still a thing? I mean.

Nasser Alimusa:
It is, like it always has got to be, though. The price of keg's these days that it's feel like.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
They're just people don't care. They don't care. More because they're good and they know they're going to pace on, they say, hey, what's this? Keg cost me three hundred and they already know what it's gonna be roughly. Because.

Tracy Neal:
How crazy is that that we're in an industry where price really doesn't matter on the on premise.

Nasser Alimusa:
It doesn't cause they're just gonna price they're just gonna price that poor to what?

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
I need to make you know, it's not unheard of to pay an $18 beer now. I'm.

Tracy Neal:
$18, you bought $18 beer.

Nasser Alimusa:
I've bought a $24, 10 ounce appeared before.

Tracy Neal:
A 20. Wow. What kind was it?

Nasser Alimusa:
It was a BrewDog double's smoke. It was like a.

Tracy Neal:
Brewdog that one that's like is was it from England or Australia?

Nasser Alimusa:
It's from. Scotland,.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Nasser Alimusa:
If I'm right.

Tracy Neal:
That's right.

Nasser Alimusa:
They have the world's strongest beer. They have the world's most expensive beer.

Tracy Neal:
I've not bought a $24 beer. I don't know if I would do that, but I will say I don't blink. Between six and ten dollars.

Nasser Alimusa:
All right. And what stops you from drinking a 24 hour one versus a $12 wine if you're about a $24 glass of wine?

Tracy Neal:
I probably have about a $24 glass of wine.

Nasser Alimusa:
So some people would I mean, that's the point. Beer is actually closing that gap in between wine and beer. Like we're drinking a beer is. Oh, you're just a beer drinker now living in Napa or whatever is prestigious about their wine. We're going to prestigious about their beer. And so it's not uncommon.

Tracy Neal:
Awesome. So what are the tips you have for somebody working in a distributor distributorship or tell me, what was the what was the hardest lesson you ever learned working at beer distributorship?

Nasser Alimusa:
Losing a handle, lose weight, flat out.

Tracy Neal:
That hurt your feelings. It was emotional.

Nasser Alimusa:
When I first started out. That was the worst thing for me. Because you're on this you're on this emotional highlight. I'm handles. I'm creating business. I'm building relationships. And you have this handle that you think so strong. And the first time you ever lose it, you're just like, why would I do wrong? What did I miss? And sometimes it just like doesn't sell or hey, I wanna do something different. And to get the process, that was always a hard thing. Like, I'm so competitive sometimes that. Yeah, I remember the hardest thing for me though. Like, I was so upset. And I remember Greg Meredith coming up to me like, hey, champ. Sometimes it just happens. And. And I remember having to listen to him and just go on like, no, Greg, it doesn't have to happen. And it was like like talking me off the bridge for a minute because I just was so upset about it. But, you know,.

Tracy Neal:
We gotta get Greg Meredith on the podcast, by the way.

Nasser Alimusa:
Greg would be great. I'll tell you some crazy stuff. And I mean, you know, working for Greg was one of the coolest things in my life because that guy was so.

Tracy Neal:
I would agree with you. I didn't I didn't work for him, but he ran a distributorship that I called on for, I don't know, four or five, six years. And those were some of the best years he was.

Nasser Alimusa:
He was the alpha of the Alphas and said, if you don't want to get up in the morning and compete, don't work here.

Tracy Neal:
Yep.

Nasser Alimusa:
And he learned that from his dad. You know, I've heard some of the big gym stories and. And Greg carried on that tradition. And I mean, you want to talk about a sales meeting when he got on? Want to just round up the troops? You're ready to go. Are you gone? You're ready. Go kick down doors. And I mean, it was like, all right, let's just go beat up a bad guy at the time. You know, it's not because he's a bad guy, just competition. But it was like you got you got the fire in the belly from that guy and you really wanted to win for him.

Tracy Neal:
That's awesome.

Nasser Alimusa:
And that, you know, and worked for Hudson was we weren't one of those distributors that had all the money in the world. We we were a Coors Light house. When I first started, it was cause I was a big brand. We'd just launch and Blue Moon. We were going through the big Blue Moon shortages of five gallon kegs as the brand was so on fire. Fat Tire Amber Ale was still one of the number one kegs.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
We're launching this little brand called Red Bull at the time and really start to see some success with that. And it was just we weren't the big cat on the street. You know, Bud Bud Light, there's a Budweiser vary in our territory. We had 400 Budweiser employees who were selling against not including the distributor. So you were the underdog. And Greg made sure, you know, you're the underdog. He's like underdogs. Got to win some time. And this is this is it.

Tracy Neal:
All right. So there was a time where you won an incentive and I got to take you to Hawaii.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
So with keeping your with keeping your foul language to a minimum, tell the story of how I took you snorkeling. And.

Nasser Alimusa:
So this is why I don't talk to Tracy all the time, because I still get mad of them. So any of you who know me know I don't like sharks. I'm definitely afraid of sharks.

Tracy Neal:
By the way shark week starts on Saturday.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yeah. And you can blame my fear of sharks on my brother because we had a pool as a kid and we'd swim and he'd come up and I grabbed me from under and water. Oh, let's go swimming. Grab my leg. I'm just scared the . I'm so I don't like sharks. I'm a big dude, so I look like a big seal in the water. Like I'm a I'm a tasty smorgasbord of a meal.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
Well, you and I go out there and you like a nascent snorkel. Like chase. I don't like deep water. I'll swim this cove. I mean, I'm a great swimmer, but I'm like a lot of like people. Not Nas, it's great. Like now let's go snorkeling in three tables. Whitehead's warheads grade the sea turtles, look at the sea turtles and said, hey, Nason swimming out there and it's an open. Anybody out there? It's an open ocean swim from this cove. We will refer the name later from this cove to these like reefs. This three reefs in our Milda Ocean.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Way we're not in Waikiki Beach. We're on the north shore of Aloha.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yep.

Tracy Neal:
There's not really a sandy beach at all. We're at a stretch probably to two mile stretch where just all coral. Right. And I mean coral wall.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
So we swim out just over the coral.

Nasser Alimusa:
And you're soon off coral ledge. I remember you saying, hey, keep an eye on the coral, because that way the waves don't take in, same in the coral. And when you could see the sea turtles just don't look right.

Tracy Neal:
Cause right is like Japan.

Nasser Alimusa:
Right is Japan. And of course, when someone says don't look, you look. And I saw this kind of cloud or the shadow move next to me. There was a cloud going over the sun. And I basically looked right. And what do I see? Three hundred feet drop off of deep blue ocean water. And I kept thinking was, all right. There's a big shark just going to come and bite my ass. And I'm sitting there swimming. I never saw a damn turtle. I never saw the reef, because all I did was watch the big deep blue ocean and make sure something come out and eat ta me. And I was so mad at you when we get out of the water, you know. What do you think? Nas it's great beep beep beep Tacy, you're a beep, beep, beep. And it is again. I know you said only sharks, by the way. That's called Sharks Cove. We just swam out of and.

Tracy Neal:
I don't know what they call it, there's no sharks there.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yeah. And then and then the famous Tracy line comes out and said, Tracy had, you know, me by shark. She goes, well, I didn't know where I could get eaten by sharks. You know, I don't refashioned the shark. I just gotta be faster than you. And basically. Yes. So you tried to feed me to a big animal. Still mad at you about that? It was a heck of a trip. Had made some friends there that day.

Tracy Neal:
Bee weesy?

Nasser Alimusa:
Bee weesy. The gyms had amazing time.

Tracy Neal:
Colonel.

Nasser Alimusa:
Colonel. Sorry, Colonel, I forgot about you for a second. Side Street Cafe. Alan Wong's never seen some as places like I remember. You know, I remember best about that trip. What was the coffee shop when you went to Mike chevallier? Like, I came, I went. I want to get some. I want to get some coffee. I yeah. I just go down there and they'll take Carrie and we walk around this coffee shop and just. Yeah, just all this coffee. I remember.

Tracy Neal:
The distributor there owns the coffee company, and so one of the gifts we used to give to visiting distributors was to take them to the coffee shop or even get all the Kona coffee and all kinds of flavors and everything.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yeah, I knew that. And I got my Heineken Ren Spooner shirt there.

Tracy Neal:
Oh, yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
I still have that shirt to this day.

Tracy Neal:
I still have it as well. I should have worn it. No. And we're gonna be on video. I didn't even think about it. I said why? You know that Heineken shirt was actually a Coors Light shirt. Did you know that?

Nasser Alimusa:
No.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Heineken shirt was designed to be a Coors Light shirt. And at the last minute, the person that was going to authorize, he was around forty forty five thousand dollars to make it. Coors Light chopped it off the budget and said, you know what, we just don't have money to make it a Coors Light. Because I worked for Coors at times, obviously, I would design a Coors Light shirt. But we had this whole design made and the distributor was really excited about it. And when the corporate Coors guy slashed the budget and got rid of it, decided not to make it. I just went to this. I said, hey, you want to put the Heineken logo on this because they were big Heineken distributor and they said, yeah. We love that shirt. You know, let's make a Heineken, we end up making them Heineken. And I kept about three shirts that worked for cause the time. I kept three shirts and I put them in my closet. And I told myself one of these days I will probably not be working for Coors and I will want to wear my Heineken shirt. So literally, I think I was probably seven years that those those shirts that my closet before I wore one.

Nasser Alimusa:
We had a Heineken mean when we work Heineken and it's just kind of a casual meeting, you know, your polishing and all that and actually wore my haggard shirt.

Tracy Neal:
What did they say?

Nasser Alimusa:
And everyone's like, where the heck did you get that? And it happened to be our on premise Heineken team from Hawaii. Who is there any goes? How do you have one of those? You only get one of those if you come to Y and work the market. I'm like, I got mine like 15 years old, bro. Have you been?

Tracy Neal:
Connections?

Nasser Alimusa:
But you know what's funny is that trip that was such a fun trip. There's so many there's people that I met for ten minutes that I still remember their names. And I always tell stories about like kyborg, the guy who ran the Volcom how.

Tracy Neal:
Kyborg?

Nasser Alimusa:
How would I still remember that for we talked that guy for what, ten minutes.

Tracy Neal:
Welcome house.

Nasser Alimusa:
You know, kyborg, Jim Lyonne, Jim Higbee. We all these guys were so influential on that one. That's my first trip to Hawaii. I was just like Kim McKamey.

Tracy Neal:
You've been back since?

Nasser Alimusa:
I've been back a few times when and MillerCoors really.

Tracy Neal:
Didn't let it down without me touring you around there.

Nasser Alimusa:
I got enough trouble on there the next time. But yeah, it's oh that your trip is still always the.

Tracy Neal:
Turtle Bay.

Nasser Alimusa:
Little Turtle Bay.

Nasser Alimusa:
Turtle Bay. The car was the Habila, the north.

Tracy Neal:
Haleiwa.

Nasser Alimusa:
Haleiwa cafe we went to.

Tracy Neal:
Haleiwa Joe's.

Nasser Alimusa:
I'm telling you. We still had a blast. And like I said, that's the one of my all time favorite trips I've ever been on.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. If anybody ever goes to Hawaii and needs some direction. I lived in Hawaii for three and half years and called on that market for an additional almost eight years. So I know the market pretty well.

Nasser Alimusa:
I'm sure Andy Irons with Coor Light, I went through to use.

Tracy Neal:
Andy and Bruce Irons. Yeah. We're our sponsors and.

Nasser Alimusa:
I remember that.

Tracy Neal:
And we sponsored them. Here's some of the. We sponsored them before either one of them had won a world championship. Andy goes on to win three championships. Right. Then I move back over to San Francisco and we go sponsor the San Francisco Giants before they go on to win three championships.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yeah, I remember that. I remember the I remember being at the unveiling of the sign in the we had the party and the unveiling of the Coors Light sign in the outfield. Then I placed the big Budweiser sign. I remember all that. Did you carry the American flag?

Tracy Neal:
Yeah, for opening day.

Nasser Alimusa:
For opening day one. They had this to say. Didn't you hold the big flag, a rally doing that? Now, like I said, there's been, you know, the beer business. The one thing the old saying is you're not going to get rich, but you got to do some really cool stuff that I can honestly say was the story of my life, of my beer career, because, I mean, I've been in the Bahamas. I've been vague. It's been the island, been to numerous Hawaii trips, Mexico, some great, great trips, some great experiences. And when you go on these trips, you just meet so many cool random people and you have this this fun. And, yeah, you become Tiffany Chan. There's another mentor to.

Tracy Neal:
Tiffany.

Nasser Alimusa:
You know, you get the Sparks and.

Tracy Neal:
Jen Sparks.

Nasser Alimusa:
You know, you got throughout some of these people that you've met and hung out with. And it's just it's just the party that made these trips, you know?

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
So I would say the Hawaii trip was still probably one of them, even though you tried to get me eaten by big shark.

Tracy Neal:
Nice. So tell me an answer from your perspective, without being a grumpy old man and just complaining. And I say that because that's what I would tend to do.

Nasser Alimusa:
Okay.

Tracy Neal:
But without being a girl and just complaining about having what's changed in the end is how is the industry different. And again, we know something. But how is the industry different today than it was, say, 10 years ago? What are some of the opportunities that maybe make it a little bit better?

Nasser Alimusa:
I think so much stuff that changes. The trips have kind of changed because the liabilities these days with people, you know, it's that is something you can always look forward to. Cool. We have this yearly trip. If you if you hustled and you made it made you want to work all year. Because you go, all right. I want to be in contention to win this trip to Hawaii. Travel gifts or travel, because, you know. There were a lot of younger, younger guys you never could be able to afford to do this, not until you really start making some good money. Yeah. So that was always something, you know, that was always in the back of my head, like was the cause distribution cut. You always knew that was coming up. So you always kind of geared your stuff. No one like you pre-planned. And you always knew like, hey, this is what's going on. And, you know, some of that's kind of gone away just and it has to just as this day and age with liabilities and people and stuff. But without sounding too grumpy, it's it's it's just the workload for some of these guys. You know, I grew up with my dad's work ethic, where you just did your job. You do your job well and you're fine. A lot of is the law of the day and age. You know, there's so many brands with this explosion of brands coming in here and distributors just picking up more and more brands. It's just the workload. It's big sometimes that. How can you do it? How can you probably do your job and rotate and P.O.S. and inventory count and discuss it with a buyer.

Tracy Neal:
Tell me about rotation your talking about rotation before.

Nasser Alimusa:
You know.

Tracy Neal:
I'm in rotation, right?

Nasser Alimusa:
Or its rotation. You knows, I work for as a distributor. I had two companies with some of the toughest audits you've ever seen with New Belgium and of course, MillerCoors or Coors at the time. You know, you get a 24 hour notice, if you like these guys, if you've ever done a cause audit, you know how stressful it is. You get this phone call at 9:00 in the morning and it's fire drill for four. Twenty 24 hours. You're out till 2:00 a.m.. I know. I was out there digging deep in wells because you don't know where everybody is and you don't know where all the beer. You don't know where all the beers are. And. And it was kind of funny. I remember someone saying this to me and it goes, well, if you did your job right, you shouldn't have to worry. And I said, that's fine. And I know I do my job right. But I'm still always going to worry because there's going to be that one time that some guy and it happened to me really bad. Somebody pulls a bottle from the top shelf and puts it in the fridge. You know, the display rack officer out gets a call for somebody's hands on the whole beer. And guess what? That happened me one time. And I remember the ashtray and I got from it. When Pete Coors got handed an expired no lite one time that I will never, ever forget.

Tracy Neal:
Really?

Nasser Alimusa:
Yup. After the Napa earthquake, we. So the course family owns a winery in Napa. Goosecross Cellars, it's great. Great.

Tracy Neal:
What's it called?

Nasser Alimusa:
Goosecross Cellars.

Tracy Neal:
Goosecross Cellars.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yeah. Christi Coors owns it.

Tracy Neal:
Christi's, yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
So the Coors family comes to Napa quite a bit. And after the Napa earthquake, we had a theater called the Uptown Theater got damaged pretty good. So they shut down. We went in there legally. You know, all the product because they were shut down from us here. You're able to pull the product. When we did so and they reopened, the one thing we never looked inside was we never had access to the green room, which was the beers that the band is. The bands are. You know, they'd go buy some of these people, bring in their own beers or have their rider contracts like, hey, I want to I want all why them and M's and a turtle in my dressing room that you're right now. Mine was a cold beer and and the comfy chair. But we never looked in there because we never thought about it. And, you know, it happened to be Pete Coors went to a show there with his family and they ran out of Coors Light because of an ordering issue that they had. And somebody goes, oh, I think there's someone in the green room. So they went in and we never knew about. They pulled out a Miller Lite and Pete Coors got handed a year old pass expiration date. Miller Lite, Pete Coors kept the can cut it in half an email, just mailed it the stamped casket where he opens a package of this chopped up cans saying, we need to do this.

Tracy Neal:
He cut it in half because on the bottom was the date.

Nasser Alimusa:
No, is on the top was one of the pints.

Tracy Neal:
And he mailed it to stand and mail it to him. That was a phone call I had never wanted. And I remember the beat and I think for that one. And it's my fault for not thinking about it being the manager, you know, you got to accept the responsibility of it. And you should for sure knew the order was coming soon now after that was happening. And. Yeah. So, you know, you always had to be worried about what's going on. Tell sale accounts. And, you know, I always say if you do your rotation right the first time, do it once a month, just flip every case, make sure and then if you maintain your golden. The easiest way to do it.

Tracy Neal:
So about some creative incentives or some of the more creative incentives that you've been involved with?

Nasser Alimusa:
There's been some really cool stuff. I was always one of the guys who really liked the fun incentives.

Tracy Neal:
Now, would you prefer for trips and prizes or cash?

Nasser Alimusa:
I like trips and prizes. That way I can hide the money from significant others and I don't have a lot of memory guys like I don't want. That's why when the term momma money,.

Tracy Neal:
Momma money?

Nasser Alimusa:
Momma money, because your incentive check went on your paycheck and momma took your money. So momma can't take your trip. Momma can take your prizes. So I always remember that some of the older guys told me that like, hey, you don't want, you know. Yeah. You make your own money, but you always want that cool trip money for that trip prize.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Nasser Alimusa:
I remember when the cooling centers was the shoe incentive,.

Tracy Neal:
The ECCO shoe incentive

Nasser Alimusa:
The ECCO shoe incentie, that came about.

Tracy Neal:
You get a pair of ECCO's?

Nasser Alimusa:
I did. And I'll say this for anybody who's worked in the trade right now, the most comfortable pair of shoes you can ever buy is a pair of ECCO shoes, their slip roofs of your on premise. You're not sliding in the back. I should get a sponsorship bill from ECCO for this.

Tracy Neal:
I should get a sponsorship from ECCO.

Nasser Alimusa:
They're slip proof. They're water resistant, super comfortable, just awesome pair of shoes and they're like 300 bucks. And it was like.

Tracy Neal:
Which is a lot of money. By the way, I've never bought a $300 pair of shoes.

Nasser Alimusa:
This is the first time I've ever owned a pair of shoes. Probably over one hundred dollars.

Tracy Neal:
Exactly. I've own them, but I've never bought them.

Nasser Alimusa:
I. Yeah. The only shoes I've ever bother over a hundred dollars on my golf shoes.

Tracy Neal:
When I ordered the samples for the sales meetings, they're all conveniently in my size.

Nasser Alimusa:
Of course the shoe, the shoe incentive was a great one. The Disney bucks I thought was a great one for some other.

Tracy Neal:
The Disney gift cards. I talked about both these in the last the last step. Yeah, I called it power talks.

Nasser Alimusa:
That was a great episode. Your power talks really resonated with me on some stuff. And, you know.

Tracy Neal:
Well, let me ask you. I'm going to do power talks in the future. And I've kind of thought about some ideas or what I might talk about. I mean, the idea of power talk is if I don't have a guest to just take maybe every five episodes yourself or so for me to just sit down and spew some expertise in some stories. Probably 9 percent expertise and ninety 91 percent stories, but nonetheless, Yemeni ideas, recommendations on topics. Really keeping in mind that our audience, our people are driving around all day selling beer. Right. Sales reps almost like an educational spin, you know. What are some things I can talk about on paradoxes?

Nasser Alimusa:
I mean, I'm an old school guy. My dad taught me about one thing is, is. I minimum saying this is no matter what this business does, he is he still says it's this day and he's old and retired.

Tracy Neal:
Because he lived through the heart attack, right? I don't know.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yeah, yeah. That's great. He's retired in Arizona. Hi, Dad. When you get to listen to this, the one thing that my dad always taught me. Don't be late. Keep your word, you know. And so I always say the biggest thing is, is relationships is build your relationships. You want to succeed in this business and you want to go that next management level. It's all about your relationships on hydro, your customers. And, you know, you can go and you can see that guy walks in and count. Never knows who you're talking to. You can walk into that account, say hi to the cook, the server, the bar, know everything. My manager, you walk in and you know you're so good at it. You know that the bar manager is driving the black Toyota Tundra outside and you know he's there. So, you know, you can come in and talk to him. And he built these relationships. And I just always tell my guys. Walk with swagger. Be the guy that owns it, owns it. That just carried the biggest bat. Because the thing is, when you walk in there, they're not good. Just talk to you about your products. They're hey, you're with this guy has what you think of it. Give an honest assessment. You can a I'm thinking about adding lines. What do you think? They're actually asking what you think to affect their business. You've become such expert to them and you have such a good relationship. You can do whatever you need. You know, these guys will want to do business with you because you've built that relationship of trust. I you know, like I said, don't be late. Don't don't assume that you're going to get everything hand, too. Don't be afraid. If you make friends with somebody that you have to stop working for, because you you have to definitely keep working to build those relationships. But selling is a relationship based business. It's a handshake. It's being in front of them. It's not a phone call. It's not a text. They got to know who you are.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Tell you what we're going to do, because I can see your passion on this topic. And I think. I love the passion. I love.

Nasser Alimusa:
I get mad about this one.

Tracy Neal:
I love it. Well, here's the deal. I love the passion. It's the right topic to do for a power talk. It is. I will tell you that you are better at speaking about this than I am. I was a supplier for 99 percent of my beer career. You're the distributor guy. You're the one with the roots. So here's what we do. I'm going to invite you back to do a power talk. We'll do it next week, branding my time in the next six months. I'm gonna invite you back to a power talk and I'll show you the way we do a power talk is we have in the other room we've got four whiteboards. So you can just kind of script out what you want. Do it by sentence or paragraph or bullet format, whatever. And we'll script out a really good 30, 45 minute power talk on how to build relationships.

Nasser Alimusa:
Awesome.

Tracy Neal:
As a beer sales rep.

Nasser Alimusa:
That would be fun because.

Tracy Neal:
You're the guy.

Nasser Alimusa:
I said and the one piece of advice I know I've talked a lot. I'm sorry. Is keep your word. Keep your well, your guy. You tell him the client could be at 2 o'clock, be there 2 o'clock if you're not.

Tracy Neal:
Keep your word on the little things it's what you're saying right.

Nasser Alimusa:
It's the little things. And if you're not going to be there, communicate to him to say, hey, man, I'm not going to be there. My mom, everybody's been late. Everybody has kids. Everybody has some come up. And if you sit and say, hey, you know, I just heard this, I heard this yesterday up at market where the guy goes, yeah, that's sort of mad at me because my book, The Tasting, but as my daughter's graduation, I said, so why don't you call her and tell her I showed up. I didn't want to. I don't want to play. And so I showed up. Only worked the hour of the three. Well, you look like a bigger jackass leaving halfway through the event and decide to say, hey, I'm stupid. I didn't have my daughter's graduation and my calendar. Can I reschedule? No guarantee they've probably had a kid's graduation. They have kids and yeah, you know, people who will understand it as long as you talk to them about it. So keep your word and communicate. It's pretty simple.

Tracy Neal:
All right. Awesome. So coming up, one of our power talks next month. We'll have you back. You can do a power talk on how to build relationships or any other topics. You think I should talk about four power talks?

Nasser Alimusa:
You know, I think honestly, the relationships are huge. P.O.S. is huge because I think point of sale on a sale where I tell you sales reps all time go off your points over. I guarantee us some really cool stuff you've never seen. And you can go out and market and really use and understand what kind of potential you have understanding the accessibility to it. I think that's huge. And I think the distributor people would want their guys to understand, hey, we have this big pile of P.O.S. and that cost a lot of money and you're not using it.

Tracy Neal:
And It's made to make your job selling easier.

Nasser Alimusa:
It is.

Tracy Neal:
It's made to help the velocity of placements. You already have and to trigger new placements that you're hoping you get.

Nasser Alimusa:
It's it's amazing how much more attention and how much more business you can get. I want impactful piece. You know, I mean, I'm looking at the sign behind you right now with the Bud Light football player. That's a hot looking piece. Or, you know, you throw a knee on something and, you know, draws that attention. Guess what? You just won. You want to fight today. And so I think I think P.O.S. would be a huge, huge subject for you.

Tracy Neal:
Nice. So before we wrap up, NASA you on social media, I'm Instagram account. Twitter account.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yeah, I think so.

Tracy Neal:
You want to broadcast it?

Nasser Alimusa:
Not really. I'm not that good at it. So I don't Twitter like.

Tracy Neal:
You don't tweet?

Nasser Alimusa:
I don't tweet.

Tracy Neal:
You do you Instagram.

Nasser Alimusa:
I Instagram.

Tracy Neal:
So I don't either.

Nasser Alimusa:
I'm starting Instagram more, but I still don't know how to work everything. I did tweet Brad Keselowski one time when he did the burnout in front of everybody in Orlando. And I don't know how to tweet like,.

Tracy Neal:
Well, I'm just trying to find a way for the iSellBeer Nation out there if you want to give Nasser some love. He's got to look up his Twitter. You know what?

Nasser Alimusa:
I'll give them the Instagram we get. How about that? I don't call the Twitter account of the guy. Like 10 people are farm and eight of them are family. So it's mrnastro, M-R-N-A-S-T-R-O.

Tracy Neal:
Mr. Nastro.

Nasser Alimusa:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
N-A-S-T-R-O.

Nasser Alimusa:
That was a nickname given to him by old construction company. When I got locked in a building overnight and I had to pay a homeless guy to call my mom to tell her that I wouldn't be coming home because of my feet.

Tracy Neal:
So you're working at a construction company. You're teenager.

Nasser Alimusa:
All right. Real quick story. I think I'm 19 or 20 years old. I used to do drywall and steel, so framing to help pay for school. And we were remodeling this architect's office and they said, when you're done. I was working the night doing some framing. And they said, when you're done, lock the door, lock the front door and go out the back door and it automatically locks and go down the stairwell and there's the door to the street and they always automatically lock. Well, lock the back door or the front door and went out the back door into the stairwell. Well, I said right when I shut that back door, I said, shoot. I should've checked that stairwell door. Sure, sure. As sure as shit. I gotta say, that door's locked. Now I'm stuck in a stairwell of this building and this kind of prior to cell phones, they didn't have a cell phone at the time. I got a pager still this day. Yeah. I'm sitting in there and there's a bar I could see I was standing outside this bar and there's a homeless guy standing there and I'm talking through him to the mail slot going, hey, man, I'm locked in this building. I need you to call. Somebody goes, $2, $2. I said, $2 for what? He goes $2 to call somebody. So I pay the homeless guy to call my mom. He calls me mom said, hey, a payphone guy on a payphone. I know where he called the. Jimmy called my mom. He did. He did. He called my mom. My mom. He just take the two dollars and walk. He didn't walk. And then I gave him another $2. And thank God I had some singles on my wallet. Really screwed. I said, hey, call my boss. And he. And he said. I said, tell him Nasser is locked in the building. So he he calls this guy, this crazy homeless guy calls him boss. Yeah. You got a Mr. Mastro locked in the building. And my boss, Larry, is like, who the hell is Mr. Nastro who hangs up? And the guy who's a man, your guy hung up on me. I said, here's my last dude, the hardest cop out there, boss. Cause my other boss, Jim and basically Jim, it's like, oh, well, like he got the message. He was out and he got the message on his voice mail us. Sure. That Larry took care of it. So basically I called three people who could do nothing about get me out. And I slept in this hallway all night and I finally having a guard days with the homeless. I'm having you're screwed. What's even worse is it's 2:00 a.m. and last call. And I'm like the lion in the cage. I'm like, trapped in this cage. And people, like, making fun of me through the glass door. I'm like talking like, hey, call somebody. I'm trapped. Like, you're really look at him. I'm a knight. I am. Seriously. There's the zoo animal. And I fell asleep. No coat, no nothing. I'm wearing shorts and t shirt. I'm dirty from working on my. I'm sleeping on the floor of this hallway of the stairwell. And I felt the lights kick on. And it's 6:00 a.m. and this poor guy who's opening the building is like, who the hell are you? And I'm like, he had a doughnut in his hand. And he's like, who the hell are you? Grab on it. Hey, it is done it. I said, I'm going, oh, through the office. I got my chunky joke, drove to my office. Some a boss gentleman. And I'm like, Hey, what the hell? And Jim's like, Bro, I heard you got locked out. What time? What time do you get out? And I said about 10 minutes ago, you guys are assholes. And he's like, Oh, my God. Nass. Go home, take the day off. And then Larry found out about it. I bro, I didn't know Mr. Nastro was you. And so I've been Mr. Castro at AOL and all those other things for years. Mr. Nastro has been fancy football name, but that name is stuck. Yeah. Mr. Nastro giving you where the last guy in Orange County.

Tracy Neal:
Well thank you for the thank you for the last entertainment. My face hurts from smiling so much Nass. It's good to have you on here.

Nasser Alimusa:
Thanks for having me, Tracy, and.

Tracy Neal:
Better to get you back in the beer business. I really hope that.

Nasser Alimusa:
I'll get back one day. I'm dabbling. Aside, and like I said, sometimes the grass is greener and got to know your eyes.

Tracy Neal:
You'll be back.

Nasser Alimusa:
I'll be back. There's some great brewries coming up and out there that I really want to be a part of.

Tracy Neal:
Awesome.

Nasser Alimusa:
I can't wait to come back.

Tracy Neal:
Thanks for making the drive up here, the headquarters. Thanks for being on the podcast. Thanks for sharing all your stories.

Nasser Alimusa:
I'm going on the Purple Palace and.

Tracy Neal:
Purple Place.

Nasser Alimusa:
Purple Place excuse me.

Tracy Neal:
The Purple Place.

Nasser Alimusa:
Purple Place get a coldy.

Tracy Neal:
The down the street from our headquarters is the purple place. The world renowned purple place. You Google it.

Nasser Alimusa:
Can't miss it.

Tracy Neal:
It is purple. Just in case you're wondering if it's all purple. And it's a dive bar, but it's awesome. It's our dive bar.

Nasser Alimusa:
Every year, Purple Place started to float with Joe Ryan there on the lake after a purple.

Tracy Neal:
But it's actually was Greg Merideth. Oh, it was Greg Meredith.

Nasser Alimusa:
You've got to have Greg on just to hear that we are floating out in the lake and we came back to have beers at the purple place. And Twitter was something new that I was trying to get engaged in. I don't remember the year, but I know the date here in a minute. And it was the day that Michael Jackson died. I'm literally showing him Twitter at the bar and I'm like, here, look at Twitter. And I pulled down and scrolled and it popped up and said, Michael Jackson found dead. And I said, this is why you use Twitter. Like, look at it. It's like immediate news. And so Greg and I, you know, we waited a little bit longer for it to hit the news, you know, 15, 20 minutes later. And it was an international news and Michael Jackson had died. We're talking the bartender, a couple other people, the bartender. And Greg and I go over to the jukebox. The bartender kind of triggers it so that all the songs are free. And we just loaded Michael Jackson on the jukebox like crazy and race and beers to Michael Jackson on the night he died at the purple plate.

Nasser Alimusa:
I just remember Greg coming back and say this person was, my God, what the hell you're talking about? So that's I remember the story.

Tracy Neal:
It's a good spot, purple place. Let's go get some.

Nasser Alimusa:
I appreciate it Tracy. I appreciate it.

Tracy Neal:
Thank you Nass. Cheers. So what's the best tasting beer in America? Who cares? That's for the consumer to decide. And until they do, you will keep selling them new brands every day as a distributor sales rep. You can become a part of the iSellBeer Nation by subscribing to this podcast and using the #iSellBeer in all your social posts. Also, be sure to join the iSellBeer Nation Facebook Group and visit our website. Our industry is an up and down the street business where local relationships matter. I want to thank you for making me a part of your day and wish you good luck on the objectives for your next account call. In fact, I know you're gonna crush it.

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