Ep. 026 NBWA NextGen: David Steinman, Beer Marketers Insights & Craft Brew News

This is the last of our NBWA Next Gen Series. David Steinman is the next in line to take up where his father left off with his publication of Beer Marketers Insights and Craft Brew News. Listen as Tracy and Harry talk about David’s first day selling beer, the things he learned and the relationships he made along the way. Our industry is all about our community, and we couldn’t be more proud to present to you David Steinman.

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David Steinman:
I think I came in right as the industry was getting less formal.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Okay

David Steinman:
Right. So.

Tracy Neal:
That's a great one.

David Steinman:
So right as I got in, you know.

Tracy Neal:
My guest for episode number twenty six is David Steinman. This is the fourth and final episode of the next gen series coming to you directly from the 38th floor of the Sheraton Hotel in New Orleans NBWA Next Gen conference is two and a half days of workshops, seminars, speakers and parties held every fall at a different location. In fact, I was just informed that the next gen group will be leading tonight's parade down Bourbon Street, complete with a Jazz Jubilee band. I'd like to thank the NBWA for hosting me this week. Craig Purser, Kim McKinnish and Lester Jones. Let's get back to David. David is the grandson of Jerry and the son of Benj, which makes him the third generation to participate in this family business started by his grandfather. For all of my sales reps who are out there driving around all day selling beer, you may not be familiar with their company. So please allow me to introduce you. David is the senior editor for Craft Beer News and his father and grandfather published Beer Marketers INSIGHTS. Beer Marketers INSIGHTS is one of the top publications in our industry for trends, insights, analytics and breaking news. But it's not always purchased or provided at the sales rep level of each distributor. David is a great guy with the charm of his father and good looks that must have come from his mother's side. He's just getting started in this industry with years of relationships and stories ahead of him. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did. iSellBeer presents to you, David Steinman.

I am not Mr. Lebowski. You're Mr Lebowski, I'm the dude.

Yeah, I tell you what. You can take a good look at it. Pictures asked by sticking your head up there. But wouldn't you rather take his word for it?

Film it all the frickin chips. Kip.

A point. Don't be jealous that I've been shown online games all day.

We have a pawn in the back pool and upon of good.

Welcome to the iSellBeer podcast with Tracy Neal, a production for sales reps and distributors who are driving around all day selling beer and the official home of the iSellBeer Nation Facebook group. And now your host. The 1989 winner of the John M. Studebaker Wheelbarrow Race in Hangtown, California, Tracy Neal!

Tracy Neal:
All right, David, welcome to the podcast.

David Steinman:
Thanks for having me.

Tracy Neal:
Thanks for being here.

David Steinman:
You wore me down.

Tracy Neal:
I wore you down. Come on, people. People want to know who you are. They want to. They want to hear from you. They want to know.

David Steinman:
It's a cool it's a cool thing to do. And so I'd be happy to join.

Tracy Neal:
Excellent. Excellent. So you are third generation for Beer Marketers INSIGHTS, right?

David Steinman:
Correct.

Tracy Neal:
Tell me a little bit about what you know about your grandfather starting the business.

David Steinman:
Well, I'm a proud butcher. A little bit of the details, but he my grandpa, Jerry Steinman, started.

Tracy Neal:
Jerry.

David Steinman:
Jerry started his own PR agency, very small, little business in late 60s and had sought one way or another, got involved with a couple bottling companies. And they were selling a lot more beer at the time. So he then was talking to more beer distributors, different suppliers. He just got his foot in the door through this PR firm that he had started and somebody he would be able to correct me on who is who is the actual guy who gave him the correct nudge? He started getting the nudge that the beer business needed more of that kind of quant data and analysis and just coverage for the industry. And he just took the leap and put together an issue, cobbled together a printing format that he liked and sent it out to. I think it was something like, you know, hundreds of distributors. Yeah. And thought to himself, hey, if I get, you know, 10 percent of them to come in for a subscription, then maybe I have something.

Tracy Neal:
And I've got a business.

David Steinman:
And lo and behold, that's how.

Tracy Neal:
That's awesome.

David Steinman:
It kind of just took off from there.

Tracy Neal:
Is Grandpa Jerry still alive?

David Steinman:
Yeah, he's 95 turning 96 this February.

Tracy Neal:
Wow. That's awesome I think. And how long did he work in the business for?

David Steinman:
He wouldn't remember exactly when he actually stopped but he was into his early 70s.

Tracy Neal:
I think it was in the 90s.

David Steinman:
So my dad became join the company in 1980 and became president in '89. And by the end, towards the end of the 90s, my grandpa was really starting to wane down in the business

Tracy Neal:
Because I guess I'm dating myself now, but I'm obviously older than you. I started in the early 90s and I remember I think I remember that the the bottom of the BMI pages were signed. Jerry and Benj.

David Steinman:
Yep. That's it.

Tracy Neal:
Right. They were signing a little hand handwritten pen on the photocopy of Jerry and Benj. Right. So.

David Steinman:
Orange paper.

Tracy Neal:
And nowadays I look at him digitally. So I don't I don't get the physical copies. Do you do some physical copies?

David Steinman:
Still do a little bit of print. Some people just are.

Tracy Neal:
Does it say, Benj? Does it Benj and David?

David Steinman:
Right now it just says Benj. But I'm working on it.

Tracy Neal:
You're working on it? Yeah.

David Steinman:
I've written a couple a couple articles for the the flagship publication. Just, you know, I've been working for six years now.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Yeah, let's talk about that. What specifically are your accountabilities for the business?

David Steinman:
I'm mostly my title as senior editor of Craft Beer News. So most of my focus is on the craft world.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

David Steinman:
But it really extends past that to all the conferences and meetings. I'm usually I'm usually out there.

Tracy Neal:
You're the travel guy. Yeah. Doesn't want to travel anymore.

David Steinman:
Exactly. But he we do a lot of doing coverage and we found that I'm a better note taker than he is.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Nice.

David Steinman:
It turns into it's always good to get out there. And, you know, you talk with the people and just get, you know, that experience of getting the news right from the source. And, you know, it's always beneficial for me to be able to kind of see it from that standpoint. And I've just sort of grown from there and written more and more as time has gone on for all of our publications.

Tracy Neal:
That's that's great. Let's. Our listeners are predominantly our core listeners, a sales rep who's driving around all day selling beer yet for all distributors. And I know a lot of times sales reps are not exactly the ones purchasing beer marketers insights. And so therefore, I'm almost thinking there's a lot of sales reps out there saying I don't even know what beer marker's insight is. Can you kind of give him that elevator pitch on? What the two publications do share and what the value is there for the distributors that are subscribe to the service.

David Steinman:
Yeah. So we are a trade publication about the beer business and what it's a very, you know, in-depth look at what's happening in our little world of beer sales, whether it's trends, news, developments, deals, you know, everything from new ad campaigns, whatever is going on. We're trying to follow it. And it's brewery profiles, new brand launches, all of the above. We're just trying to really narrow in on what everyone's doing and and make sure that everyone can be who's reading us is as informed as possible about our industry. So you can then go out and make better decisions themselves.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. And my my perspective as a reader is you guys are very quantitative slash analytical.

David Steinman:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
You're you're is is definitely for someone who's in the quant analytical side.

David Steinman:
We're very we've always liked our data and and ah. And that's definitely more of our our attack. So, you know, we get regular reports of scanned data from IRA and Nielsen that we track regularly. We get shipments, data from the TV and, you know, all the different organizations and associations sort of track as well. So we were just really cobbling together all of that and just looking at how it's changing over time. And, you know, you can really learn a lot just by looking at these different little pockets of data.

Tracy Neal:
So did you. Did you see the Seltzer? I usually try not to get into brand trends because two or three years and now this conversation might be irrelevant. But I have to say. Did you see the seltzer thing coming?

David Steinman:
I definitely did not. The way the way that it's exploded. But in retrospect, everything's 20/20.

Tracy Neal:
In retrospect, it's clear as mud.

David Steinman:
Yeah. Absolutely. But but no. You know, I sort of looked at it as another version of hard soda. I think a lot of people did.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

David Steinman:
You know, I think I understood that there was a little more potential staying power because of the way that it was. You know, that was just early days of people really using are you connotation. But and that made sense to me. But I didn't know it could be anything close to this big until you really just see these astronomical numbers. I mean, it's so just to give a little bit of quiet on it. It's, you know, potentially going to be sixty five to set somewhere between sixty five million and seventy five million cases of hard seltzer will be sold calendar year 2019.

Tracy Neal:
So put that in perspective for me. Compare it to a brand that's about 70 million cases a year.

David Steinman:
So the whole let's see that is about five million barrels. So about you know, Pabst is about as a total break that maybe there perhaps is like.

Tracy Neal:
All Pabst brands or just maybe.

David Steinman:
All Pabst brands.

Tracy Neal:
Okay, so. So the seltzer market is essentially the size of the Pabst Brewing Company.

David Steinman:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Wow.

David Steinman:
And Boston Boston beer is right at that at that 5 million barrel.

Tracy Neal:
With or without dogfish?

David Steinman:
With.

Tracy Neal:
With? OK.

David Steinman:
So yeah, it's there.

Tracy Neal:
So yeah, the the industry just kind of birth a medium sized supplier out of nowhere.

David Steinman:
Exactly. And now you've got Boston beer talking about the category potentially doubling again next year that you know, they were talking about on their most recent...

Tracy Neal:
Wow.

David Steinman:
Quarter. So, you know, 10 million barrels out of nowhere is basically what we could be looking at by by next year. Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
That's great. So going back to your job and what you do for the publications. Did you know that this is what you were going to do? Did you study journalism in college? Did you go back to like when you're eight or nine years old, you're seeing dad go to the office and everything? I mean, there's probably some years in there when you're nine and you're like, I totally want to be my dad. Then there's years when you're fifteen, you know, like I'm going to do the exact opposite of what my dad does. It tell me that journey and how you ended up deciding to follow in your father's footsteps.

David Steinman:
I think from a pretty early standpoint on, I knew that I was going to give the business a shot. I mean, maybe not when I was 10 or 15. And but, you know, as you start to look at your options and you see this cool, this interesting little business that our family is, but it just always struck me as something that was worth giving a shot. At some point in my life, I didn't necessarily know I would enter into it as quickly as I did. I just as I was going into college. I ended up studying business, which was pretty general, I would have been better off studying journalism for sure. But yeah,.

Tracy Neal:
Did you pick up things at the dinner table when you were little? I mean, I'd like come to the dinner table. Go, boy, you should hear what Anheuser-Busch did today or.

David Steinman:
I don't think it was quite like that. But my first job was stuffing envelopes for our physical the physical art newsletter.

Tracy Neal:
Back when it was all mail.

David Steinman:
Back then it was all mail.

Tracy Neal:
I'd pay my kids to stuff our envelopes as well. And we do pick of the week.

David Steinman:
Yeah, there you go.

Tracy Neal:
We have a thing called pick of the week. Where are the key eight holidays? We take pictures of the displays of our customers. We pick one or two or three out that are really good and we print them and we put them in tubes. And of course, all my friends go, you could email that and go. That's the last thing my customers want. Another email. So we actually physically put them in tubes and on holidays and my kids stuff them as well.

David Steinman:
Yeah. No, it's a. It was an easy it was a good way to sort of like wrap your head around a little bit of what was going on in this company. But, you know, I had no idea what was actually being written about when I was nine or 10 stuffing envelopes. I. Oh, it's cool. It's about beer.

Tracy Neal:
You're like dad types a letter. He photocopies it three hundred times, puts an envelope in every sense of money.

David Steinman:
And I don't even know if I was thinking that sophisticated. But over time, I you know, that was my high school job, too, for the most part. And I was really just something to help get a little bit of allowance kind of.

Tracy Neal:
Spending money. Yeah.

David Steinman:
And when I when I went into college, I think the first year that I did my freshman year was 2008 and I interned. Yeah. And that was the summer of InBev. Oh, yeah. I'll take over. And and MillerCoors.

Tracy Neal:
MillerCoors, AB in July and AB and BEB in August.

David Steinman:
That's my first actual, you know, little three month stint of writing and trying to learn the business a little bit. So I was a little bit a trial by fire this year.

Tracy Neal:
Those were the crazy months for sure.

David Steinman:
Yeah. There's a new development in the will they won't they. You know, every single day and all the mass publications were covering it too. So even more focus on our little world here than than usual. Yeah. Keeps us on our toes.

Tracy Neal:
What's it mean to you to work with your dad.

David Steinman:
It's awesome. It's just purely, you know, a cool thing to be able to do.

Tracy Neal:
And I'm sure that, you know, sometimes from sometimes when we look at families from the outside and I'm seeing this from my own family, sometimes people go, oh, yeah, you know, your brother, you know, I know your dad, whatever. And they always assume that we're always identical. Right. Sometimes you want to jump and go. By the way, we're a little bit different. Yeah, I'm sure that's the case with you and your father are very similar in many ways, but also some ways are very different. So how have you guys worked out how that works at the office?

David Steinman:
Yeah, that's a good question. I think we work really well together. I. In part because I know that I'm not nearly as capable yet and I'm working towards it. But he's he's still 100 percent. You know, the guy running the ship. And I'm not and I'm not in a rush necessarily to try and take that. And he's he's just working as hard as he's ever worked. There's there's too much news and he's enjoying it. He's he's all over the place. He's just in California.

Tracy Neal:
Was it CBBD?

David Steinman:
CBBD.

Tracy Neal:
Yes.

David Steinman:
Which, I know. I've seen you out there before.

Tracy Neal:
Yes, Jim. Jim Kinney and I flipped a coin. He went to CBBD. I came to New Orleans for Next Gen.

David Steinman:
He was out there, I think, doing a doing a speech himself. But, yeah, he's I think probably still overworking himself a little bit. But we're we're a small company trying to just wrap our heads around it.

Tracy Neal:
And I remember when I met your dad and I think. Are you working with Gerry Khermouch?

David Steinman:
Yes. He's running are non outlet.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Let me give you a shout out. What's up, Gerry?

David Steinman:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
So here's my here's my Gerry Khermouch story. I'm living in Seattle in 19. I was either '95 or '96. So I'm like 25 years old. Right. This is nearly 22, 23 years ago. And I was at a conference and I can't remember why. But for some reason Gerry and I struck up a conversation and your dad was there. And so Gerry introduced me to your dad. And then the next day Gerry had mentioned to me that he was gonna stick around the Seattle market. Just kind of drive around and see what was up. Well, we'd kind of hit it off, you know, from analytical standpoint on the way we looked at things and our observation skills. And he said he was gonna drive. And I said, Hey, Gerry, do you mind if I host you? I mean, I'm happy to drive you around and take you to stores and let's just talk. And so Gerry and I drove all the way all around Seattle that next day your dad had to fly back. Early, so I briefly met him, but then he had a great relationship with Gerry and your dad ever since. And I think what's really cool is how much not just the three of you, but I'm sure everybody else on your team, they haven't met. But you guys obviously have such a passion for what you do.

David Steinman:
Yeah. I mean, it's it's awesome to be able to say that, you know, we've been able to keep this thing going and really, you know. Oh, you can only be grateful that this industry has been able to, you know, be a part of our lives for generations.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Third.

David Steinman:
And also not just a shout out. We we've got another little generational thing going on in our office. Matt, the Eric Shepard is another guy who's been at our company longer than my daddy than and his son is the co senior editor of Crapper News, Chris Shepard with with myself. So here we got two generational thing going on.

Tracy Neal:
That's great. And where your headquarters.

David Steinman:
We are the global headquarters as we as.

Tracy Neal:
I have a global headquarters, too.

David Steinman:
Yeah, it's suburb New York, Rockland County, a little suburb about about an hour north west of New York City. Right on the border of northern Jersey.

Tracy Neal:
Okay, got it. That's awesome.

David Steinman:
Now, it's it's a nice little place. That's where I grew up after the parents made the move from from the city to the burbs.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

David Steinman:
But we have a nice little office, though, house that we converted into an office. It's nice and spacious. We all have our own.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Nice.

David Steinman:
A little windowed office.

Tracy Neal:
Good.

David Steinman:
All that good stuff.

Tracy Neal:
Tell me about your interaction with distributors and if you have any particular stories of individual distributors that you've worked with or been exposed to and how you guys maintain those relationships.

David Steinman:
Well, I mean. That's one of the best parts about the businesses. We've known distributors for generations, too. From my grandpa down.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah, we just talked with Douglas Cone III downstairs at lunch.

David Steinman:
My dad and Doug go way back and have been close friends in this industry, I think, for for a very long time.

Tracy Neal:
Yep, I just had Douglas on the podcast in the last episode and he when your name came up, he said, I want to meet David. Let's go downstairs. I introduce you to him. Yeah. It's good for you guys to know each other now. Multi-generational relationship.

David Steinman:
Yeah. So just one that jumps out right away as my my grandpa was friends with the ,.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

David Steinman:
From the the you know, there.

Tracy Neal:
In Portland.

David Steinman:
In Portland, Oregon. And so they used to go out. My grandpa and my grandma used to go out and have like a regular. I think once a year kind of meet up with with.

Tracy Neal:
Did this relationship spanned the country from New York to Portland or did one of the family's live closer?

David Steinman:
I think it spanned the country.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

David Steinman:
Maybe it wasn't once a year meet it, but it was just, you know, interacting through all the different meetings that everyone too. They developed a friendship and it was maybe even just staying in touch a little more than than others. And that translated over to Robbie Militas.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Robbie Militas is your age.

David Steinman:
Robbie Militas is my age then. So I now know Robbie and and Peter and I think that their daughter is also coming into the business now, too.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

David Steinman:
So we've just had three generations of being able to know each other now. And so anytime that we've had an event in Oregon or they've been in New York at different times, yeah, we've been able to sort of connect more.

Tracy Neal:
That's great. Have you ever gone out and done a work with or written a route to with a sales rep?

David Steinman:
Yeah, well, actually, that's another gap in my in my story that drove me into beer, was I?

Tracy Neal:
Because I don't think.

David Steinman:
I went to University of Vermont and I ended up getting a job with a local brewery up there as just a summer gig.

Tracy Neal:
What's the mascot of U.V.?

David Steinman:
The word we're some sort of a Catamount. It's called it's basically a mountain lion.

Tracy Neal:
It's it called a Catamount.

David Steinman:
Catamount. The Vermont Catamount.

Tracy Neal:
Go Catamounts.

David Steinman:
Yeah. We're we're not a big sports school, but we have a good hockey team.

Tracy Neal:
Okay, good. So you say you did that and then you said you went to work for local brewery.

David Steinman:
A long trail and Otter Creek are sort of a combined. You see in Vermont and there one of the larger and longer established companies, OK, up there and it was just the right place, right time. So I needed a summer job. Still living in Burlington. And I ended up getting through the help of my dad, an interview with the company at the time and just doing events, promos, ride alongs. I even did some merchandising. Good. Oh, that's just that is it. It was a good intro for me. And then and then I ended up getting hired full time. More on the marketing side.

Tracy Neal:
That's awesome.

David Steinman:
Delivering POS and keeping track of inventory and stuff like that. Glassware and Tap handles.

Tracy Neal:
Well, I'm going to give you an open invitation to go do a crew drive with me.

David Steinman:
Sure.

David Steinman:
Anywhere in the country with the distributor. I actually this is if you listen to the episode where we interview Lester Jones from the NBWA, Lester and I did this. We met up in Cincinnati and we went out and worked with the guys for Ohio Eagle there before before the Memorial Day holiday period. And I think this would be really cool to not only do, but I think you'll get some good insights on one, really. I know when I go to crew drives, I mean.

David Steinman:
You learned so much.

Tracy Neal:
I love doing the labor. I loved connecting with the individuals that I'm working with. But also my brain just scans the whole store and the boxes. And I I'm able to either confirm or decline hypotheses that live in my head about the way I think the world works.

David Steinman:
Absolutely. I think I think everybody in this business can't. Once you start getting wrapped up in it, can't go into a store without you looking at things differently. Analytically, sir. Oh, I see that brand. Has a little more extra placements here. Is anything.

Tracy Neal:
Exactly. Good. I'll help you, sir. Well, I will I will text you my case. I know it may take us three to ten months to pull this off, but that's OK. Yeah, we're not going anywhere. You're not going anywhere. So we'll figure it out and find a way to do it. And I'd love to connect with somewhere and go work with them. Weren't in the market with one of our distributors. What would you like to say to your. I asked the other older guys the interview with me. I couldn't ask him to go back through their whole career. You're one of the younger guys. You might have seen how old you are. Thirty. Thirty. Okay. A lot of 30 year olds here at the next gen.

David Steinman:
The next gen where? That's probably right.

Tracy Neal:
Thirty for sweet spot.

David Steinman:
It is probably even a little younger, too. But I think there is this this week's vote at the Net. By the way, this conference, the next generation and a I think they would probably say and they do say basically that this is one of the best things that they've ever done as a program.

Tracy Neal:
When the NBWA is done?

David Steinman:
The NBWA has done. It just makes so much sense. And they are leaning into just having these people up and coming leaders in their industry more get more involved.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

David Steinman:
I mean it's just.

Tracy Neal:
So as the next gener. Do you have any any productivity hacks you want to share with the audience? It's a special apps year you're into right now or whether it drives productivity or makes your life better or.

David Steinman:
I don't know, I'm not the best person to to tout any kind of tech apps. I like my Spotify and my podcasts here and there.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Any podcast, a podcast you want to recommend?

David Steinman:
I've been listening to Bill Simmons Sports Sports podcast.

Tracy Neal:
Bill Simmons, huh.

David Steinman:
Yeah. If you're into sports. Bill Simmons does a really good job. He's got his all the ringer podcast. It's a mix of sports and pop culture kind of thing. But he's a longtime writer. He wrote the book of basketball.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

David Steinman:
I'm a huge hoops nerd.

Tracy Neal:
You're a huge hoops nerd. Have you heard? Do you listen to revisionist history with Malcolm Gladwell?

David Steinman:
No. But actually, Bill Simmons and Malcolm Gladwell are really close friends.

Tracy Neal:
Are they friends?

David Steinman:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
So Malcolm Gladwell has a great podcast called Revisionist History.

David Steinman:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
And one of the episodes is about the underhand granny shot in the NBA and in the statistics in the history of it.

David Steinman:
Yep.

Tracy Neal:
And it's fascinating,.

David Steinman:
I bet. Yeah. I mean, it was, what, probably like the highest percentage,.

Tracy Neal:
It's the highest percentage ever.

David Steinman:
Yeah. It's crazy.

Tracy Neal:
And it's been tested and tested as it continues by this percentage. And for some reason despite being passionate about winning and doing all these different kinds of things to make our athletes better and better and better. And despite how many basketball games are at one point differential, nobody will do it. It's a really. What about what about, Netflix or Hulu, streaming recommendations? Anything you're binge on right now?

David Steinman:
That's a good question too. What did I just watch? There's a show called The End of the End of the Fucking World.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

David Steinman:
I just watched the first season and it was good. And there's a second one that just came out, so I'm going to check that out.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

David Steinman:
Yeah, I guess I haven't really been watching too much, but I I watch a lot of a lot of random streaming things. I just can't even think of it right now.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. What would you would you like? You said your future self. 20 years from now. I mean, this this podcast absolute will be out there when you're 50 years old and you've done.

David Steinman:
The eternal interwebs.

Tracy Neal:
Yes. Hey, self.

David Steinman:
Yeah. That's a good question. I would I would just say that, you know, keep keep enjoying it and.

Tracy Neal:
Keep having fun?

David Steinman:
Keep having fun. Keep finding time to spend with other people that you get to meet in this industry and make sure that you're enjoying what you're doing.

Tracy Neal:
What's one of the coolest changes you're seeing going on in our industry right now? Not necessarily brand related, but just a change in the way the industry is done. I think it's good for the business.

David Steinman:
I've got what? I don't know if it's this is maybe not necessarily good or bad for the business. But one thing that I think I came in right as the industry was getting less formal.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah, okay.

David Steinman:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
So that's a great one.

David Steinman:
So right as I got in, you know, we still have our conferences where I think in New York. People still treat it a little differently as a more buttoned up city, that kind of thing. But it's just progressively every year getting more and more casual. And and it's it's appreciated from the younger generation. I think just tends to go that route. But yeah, I mean, I give credit AB down there. They just don't dress up the way that.

Tracy Neal:
Not as many tuck and shirts and ties?

David Steinman:
That's not a requirement anymore. I think that's actually. I just think that's a good thing for.

Tracy Neal:
That's a great insight. And I agree with you because I come from the early era where it was slacks and ties.

David Steinman:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. Now it's golf shirts and jeans. So it's much more relaxed. Awesome. Anybody else out there that you want to give a shout out to that's kind of helped you in your career or been patient with you at times where you flopped or anything like that?

David Steinman:
Probably everybody. Right?

Tracy Neal:
Everybody I've ever met.

David Steinman:
Everybody I've ever met. Thank you for being patient with me.

Tracy Neal:
Or somebody that's mentored you or take you under their wing or went the extra mile to teach you the ropes of this industry.

David Steinman:
I mean, to be honest, I just. I've learned so much from being involved with our my my dad and closely working with him and my grandpa, Eric, separate at our office and everyone. Is that from that standpoint of learning how to do what we do? That's those are the people that have taught me the most, but every wholesaler that I've ever talked to. I don't necessarily want to need to name names, but it's just everybody, every brewer who's taken the time to sit down with me and talk for a profile article has just been super helpful for being able to give me their time and and tell me it's all.

Tracy Neal:
That's awesome.

David Steinman:
Show me how they see the world.

Tracy Neal:
Very cool. Very cool. Well, David, I've really appreciated the time to sit down. I know that we're both headed for flights this afternoon. And I would I would extend this for another half hour or so because I could think of a million other things. I'd love to keep talking you about, but we're late on flights and it's the third day of the brand new New Orleans airport. So we've heard it's a bit of a mess over there.

David Steinman:
I'd say we could have a little trouble getting in. But once you get in, it seems like, yeah, pretty nice in there.

Tracy Neal:
It's a very nice airport. You're right. It's just it's restricted to one, two lane road in, you know, the airport at this point. Yeah, that's it's pretty brutal getting a cab as we close out. What's your. If you were the lead singer of a band or if you were a musician in a band. Which band would it be?

David Steinman:
That's a good that's a good question for me, because I'm a music. I am actually a little bit of a.

Tracy Neal:
Music guy? OK. I didn't even know.

David Steinman:
Ray's Ray's music guy through and through love all the rock and rock and roll, 60s, 70s and all blues stuff.

Tracy Neal:
What do you play?

David Steinman:
Guitar player.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. You're a guitar player.

David Steinman:
I would say that.

Tracy Neal:
So let me set the stage. There's a band coming to Madison Square Garden tomorrow. They pick up the phone because their guitar player is sick. David, we need you to step in. Who's that band?

David Steinman:
Oh, it's for me. It's between it's between Dylan and the Beatles. It's the.

Tracy Neal:
Bob Dylan and the Beatles?

David Steinman:
Bob Dylan and the Beatles.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. That's awesome. Since you mentioned Bob Dylan. I have to bring up revisionist history again here. There's a revisionist history. Episode by Malcolm Gladwell called Hallelujah.

David Steinman:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
And it talks about the song Hallelujah and how it was took five to six years to write by the original writer. I can't remember his name, but took five to six years to write. And then it was covered two or three times before it made it big in the late 90s, and now it's been covered 20 times. And so Malcolm Gladwell uses the song Hallelujah. You talk about long, long creativity, indefinite creativity. And he compares it to Picasso and another painter and about how, Picasso and Bob Dylan were creative in five minutes. So a lot of Bob Dylan songs, he's admitted he's written in less than five minutes. And a lot of Picasso's paintings were done in five to 10 minutes. And so he compares short creativity with long creativity. So check out that since you mentioned Bob Dylan. You'll like that.

David Steinman:
I mean, I know. And that is an interesting example, because had Jeff Buckley is was the guy who made it popular in the 90s and yet, you know,.

Tracy Neal:
And he was like the third guy to cover it.

David Steinman:
30 years after the song.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. So you'll like that. Good.

David Steinman:
Absolutely.

Tracy Neal:
Awesome. David, I really enjoyed it. Thanks for taking time. Thank you for all that you and your dad do. And your grandfather started the whole thing.

David Steinman:
And I just feel fortunate to be in a position like we're going to keep doing it.

Tracy Neal:
That's exactly what I like to do. And I would like to hear I tell people about my business, what I want to love, what I'm doing and having fun. And I have to say, I'm writing bull's eye on that right now with iSellBeer software platform and the podcast is just so much fun. So thank you. I've enjoyed it. Have a go one, David. Thank you. So what's the best tasting beer in America? Who cares? That's for the consumer to decide. And until they do, you will keep selling them new brands every day as a distributor sales rep. You can become a part of the iSellBeer Nation by subscribing to this podcast and using the #iSellBeer in all your social posts. Also, be sure to join the iSellBeer Nation Facebook Group and visit our website. Our industry is an up and down the street business where local relationships matter. I want to thank you for making me part of your day and wish you good luck on the objectives for your next account call. In fact, I know you're gonna crush it.

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