Ep 032: Sales Rep XX

The anonymous millennial series continues with our first female millennial. Listen as Tracy and Sales Rep XX talk about her first day selling beer, the things he learned and the relationships he made along the way. Our industry is all about our community, and we couldn’t be more proud to present to you Sales Rep XX.

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Sales Rep XX:
I think woman in the beer industry. Wait. What do you do? You sell beer? Yeah, but they.

Tracy Neal:
So do women say that as much as men?

Sales Rep XX:
I think women are more confused and the concept than men are.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Yeah. Because I was gonna say, If I hear that a woman sells beer. I'm like, okay, cool.

Sales Rep XX:
You're awesome in the industry.

Tracy Neal:
My guest for episode number 32 is Sales Rep XX. You're about to hear from another anonymous sales rep in our millennial series. This person, however, she contacted me and asked why I hadn't yet interviewed a female millennial sales rep. She asked if she could be the first, and she asked if she could be Sales Rep XX for her double X chromosome rather than Sales Rep X3. So I jumped on a plane and said, yes. Sales Rep XX and I met in a conference room above a working brew pub. So there's some occasional background noise, but it's the brewing of fresh beer. Here she is. She's a distributor sales rep. She's a millennial. She's anonymous and she's female. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did. iSellBeer presents to you, Sales Rep XX.

I am not Mr. Lebowski. You're Mr Lebowski, I'm the dude.

Hey, I tell you what, you can take a good look at a is asked by sticking your head up there. But wouldn't you rather take his word for it?

Film and eat all the frickin chips. Kip.

A point. Don't be jealous that I've been shown online with games all day.

We have a pawn in the back, a pool and a pot of good.

Welcome to the iSellBeer podcast with Tracy Neal, a production for sales reps and distributors who are driving around all day selling beer and the official home of the iSellBeer Nation Facebook group. And now your host. The 1989 winner of the John M. Studebaker Wheelbarrow race in Hangtown, California, Tracy Neal.

Tracy Neal:
All right. Sales Rep Double double X. Is it XX or double X?

Sales Rep XX:
Double X, sounds cooler.

Tracy Neal:
Double X. Okay. Sales Rep XX. I'm here with Sales Rep XX, an anonymous unnamed sales rep working for a Red Distributor somewhere in the country selling lots of products. And we've got to give you a fake name, first of all, because otherwise I'm gonna accidentally say your real name. And so the way we did a fake name was sales rep X. And by the way, you're double x ray indicating the female chromosome.

Sales Rep XX:
That's correct.

Tracy Neal:
Right? You actually called me and said you haven't had a woman on the podcast yet who was a sales rep.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah, I LinkedIn you.

Tracy Neal:
Yes. You sent me a LinkedIn message and said, where can we meet in the country? And we found a neutral place. We've both flown quite a bit to get here. So we're not in either one of our home states. And Sales Rep XX, I think the way we did the fake name with Sales Rep X was middle name and mother's maiden name. So what is your middle name?

Sales Rep XX:
Let's just go. Middle name.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep XX:
All right. Two. So that might be cool.

Tracy Neal:
We'll just call you whatever you want to be called, just give me a fake name.

Sales Rep XX:
I'd say Jewels, that's my middle name.

Tracy Neal:
Jewels. OK, so we're here with Sales Rep XX. Who's going to be unidentified as Jewels and Jewels? How old are you?

Sales Rep XX:
Thirty.

Tracy Neal:
Thirty. Fallen into the millennial phase. Thirty years old. And how long have you been in the beer business?

Sales Rep XX:
Thirteen years.

Tracy Neal:
Thirteen years?

Sales Rep XX:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
OK. And you were most recently and SEC a Big Red Bud distributorship. SEC means, sales...

Sales Rep XX:
Sales Execution Coordinator.

Tracy Neal:
Sales Execution Coordinator. Something every Anheuser-Busch distributors has.

Sales Rep XX:
Really intimidating.

Tracy Neal:
Right. Tell me a little bit. What's the sales execution coordinator job do?

Sales Rep XX:
Everything.

Tracy Neal:
Everything okay?

Sales Rep XX:
They really do. I give them a lot of credit. I give myself a lot of credit that we are the main person to translate Anheuser-Busch calls to our wholesaler, to our rep, to our rep team.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So in an SEC role, you only look after Anheuser-Busch strategies or do you look at the rest of the portfolio for that particular distributor?

Sales Rep XX:
I started off looking at only Anheuser-Busch portfolio, but towards the end of the career, I did our whole entire portfolio.

Tracy Neal:
Was that your direction or the company's direction or just evolved that way?

Sales Rep XX:
Probably evolve. My go getter. So just give me more.

Tracy Neal:
Yes. You want to. You want to tackle it. So at 30 years old, you've been in the business for 13 years. That puts you back to. I'm not really good at math, but it puts you back to 17?

Sales Rep XX:
Seventeen.

Tracy Neal:
Okay, especially subtraction that put you back to 17. What were you doing at age 17 in the beer industry?

Sales Rep XX:
I was part time in the office admin work.

Tracy Neal:
For a distributorship?

Sales Rep XX:
Yes, for the same distributor.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Same distribution. Part time in the office at age 17.

Sales Rep XX:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
Wow. And do you remember your first day on the job at age 17?

Sales Rep XX:
I do. And I feel like because I listen to your podcast, I think about this and I remember my interview and I remember my first day vaguely.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep XX:
I remember like what I wore.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. What did you wear?

Sales Rep XX:
I wore brown pants, brown slacks and a shirt that I thought was really cool that matched perfectly as like brown and green and tan.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep XX:
And now looking back, like I probably looked like I was out of a Scooby Doo.

Tracy Neal:
But at the time you thought it was the perfect outfit?

Sales Rep XX:
I thought that was gray as my first business corporate job. And I was. So.

Tracy Neal:
So how long were you in the office for?

Sales Rep XX:
Five and a half years.

Tracy Neal:
Five and a half years? Okay. And then what did you migrate your role to after the office as accounts receivable, in the office. And I pushed my way into sales. I started merchandising and doing some promotions.

Sales Rep XX:
Nice.

Tracy Neal:
Yes. Okay.

Sales Rep XX:
It wasn't easy. I had to fight tooth and nail.

Tracy Neal:
Why did you have to fight?

Sales Rep XX:
I would like to say that I fought my way in because I was doing really well in the office. I think I know that I was an asset in the office and I don't think that it was in a small wholesaler. Easy to transition people.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep XX:
So I was doing really well. I move me, but I really wanted to get into sales.

Tracy Neal:
By the way, for our listeners, we are in an upstairs office above a bar. So you hear the occasional cheers

Sales Rep XX:
We didn't do our beer.

Tracy Neal:
Oh. But if you hear the occasional cheers downstairs, that's some people down there having a lot of fun. So we have a good beer here. It's a can which makes for the best audio. Great. Open our beers.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
OK. Let's open our beers. Very nice.

Sales Rep XX:
I have to pour mine too in the glass.

Tracy Neal:
Very nice. So you're gonna pour it in a beer, clean glass. Right. It's the right type of glass.

Sales Rep XX:
Yes, delicious.

Tracy Neal:
So interesting that you have so many years in this industry. And there's also another little secret. I'll let the cat out of the bag right now, but we won't get too many specifics. But after 13 years of this distributorship, you have just accepted a new offer with a supplier. Yes. OK. So tell me, there's so much I want to ask you. I want to kind of go through the lineage of the linear track of your career and get more into the details of that first day on the job and all that. But let me jump forward a little bit and say, why was it important to you or what led you to the opportunity other than I'm sure, your suppliers, an amazing employer. Right.

Sales Rep XX:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
Which everybody would say on their first day.

Sales Rep XX:
Absolutely.

Tracy Neal:
But what led you to this decision for your career?

Sales Rep XX:
I think advancement, learning more about this industry when you're in a wholesaler, sometimes there's a ceiling. And I just I felt this time to spread your wings and fly and continue to soak up everything there is to know and continue to sell some great beer to more people.

Tracy Neal:
Good. And you're excited to get started on that next week.

Sales Rep XX:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Well, we're gonna miss you in the distributor world. But you had contacted me about two months ago before this whole thing started. So it's kind of a unique play here that we're getting you right before you. I mean, maybe we'll have you a year from now when your supplier for a year and see you, you can give feedback every on what it was like going.

Sales Rep XX:
Absolutely.

Tracy Neal:
To a supplier, what you thought was good, bad and the ugly.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah. And I'll be working closely with my distributors.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So you took a job with a supplier that your distributor sells?

Sales Rep XX:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So it was a friendly...

Sales Rep XX:
Friendly.

Tracy Neal:
Departure.

Sales Rep XX:
Friendly. No bridges burned.

Tracy Neal:
Yes, that's always good. So what do you like best about being in beer sales?

Sales Rep XX:
The people I love, the co-workers that you have in the beer world as working in a distributor, you become family. You love the guys you're working next to of the women you're working next to you loving your accounts, relationships. They're valuable.

Tracy Neal:
Do you remember the first account you called on?

Sales Rep XX:
I don't remember the name exactly. And this was in swing sales.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep XX:
If you fast forward.

Tracy Neal:
What is swing sales?

Sales Rep XX:
Swing sales, filling in for a rep and route location.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So like relief.

Sales Rep XX:
Relief swing sales. Yeah. And it was a very, very, very small town. And I walked in thinking the world was my only, it''s kind of like, let's go sell them everything in our portfolio. And the guy just looked up and he's like, hi Jewels and I would like to show you some new things we're pushing. And what's kind of an you get a little see and what the regular reps are pushing and you want to help that man just find your way in the door, sort of set up so to say. And I. He's just like now and just slid me like a crumpled up receipt.

Tracy Neal:
Here's my order.

Sales Rep XX:
And I took the. Just be as if this is great. Thank you so much. And just so you know, this new product here that we're pushing and I want to tell you about it in here, just like thanks. But and there are some regulars. So early rejection early. And it didn't. I just looked around and there were like four regulars and they were drinking Budweiser. And I said, how about you guys, Bud? And they were like, old enough to buy this. And I got them a Bud. And I felt amazing. I didn't care that he said no anymore because they were like.

Tracy Neal:
They were happy.

Sales Rep XX:
I remember when the bad guy 25 years ago bought me a blood. Oh, I got a woman buy me a bottle.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep XX:
Wow. George, I haven't times changed, but I walked out of that account with the order. Great. And and no, but I made these four guys at the bar really big and it felt really cool.

Tracy Neal:
What about any memorable incentives that used to do?

Sales Rep XX:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
Whether you participated in or that you won.

Sales Rep XX:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
I think you went on a cruise this summer, right?

Sales Rep XX:
Yes. The Bud Light cruise.

Tracy Neal:
The Bud Light cruise. Where is the Bud Light cruise?

Sales Rep XX:
The Bud Light cruise at. Where did we board Miami and we went to Key West and a private Bud Light Island.

Tracy Neal:
Bud Light Island, huh?

Sales Rep XX:
Yes. And right before the hurricane and everything.

Tracy Neal:
Oh, right before the hurricane. What? How many people are on the Bud Light cruise?

Sales Rep XX:
I would like to say close to a thousand.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. So it's a big boat, it's a really big boat.

Sales Rep XX:
It was a huge ship, Norwegian.

Tracy Neal:
Like a real cruise ship.

Sales Rep XX:
Real cruise ship. Bud Light no pun intended.

Tracy Neal:
I thought you were going to tell me it's like a 12 pontoon boat down at the harbor.

Sales Rep XX:
No all.

Tracy Neal:
Real cruise ship with a thousand people on it.

Sales Rep XX:
It's amazing.

Tracy Neal:
Do they not know? I did not get the invite for this.

Sales Rep XX:
Guest list.

Tracy Neal:
Dear Anheuser-Busch, Tracy Neal would like to go on the Bud Light cruise next summer.

Sales Rep XX:
And in return.

Tracy Neal:
I am available. In return. I'll interview everybody, how's that? I'll bring iSellBeer hats.

Sales Rep XX:
There we go. Or the sweater you wearing.

Tracy Neal:
Oh, yes. I am wearing my iSellBeer sweater. Do you like this?

Sales Rep XX:
Yes, it's very vibrant.

Tracy Neal:
I have one many ugly sweater contests in the last in the last week.

Sales Rep XX:
With that sweater?

Tracy Neal:
Yes.

Sales Rep XX:
Okay. That's a good one.

Tracy Neal:
So tell me about your first boss without naming them.

Sales Rep XX:
Ever?

Tracy Neal:
No. In the beer business.

Sales Rep XX:
OK.

Tracy Neal:
Or how about a memorable boss?

Sales Rep XX:
Those are two different people. The first boss are memorable boss.

Tracy Neal:
I don't know. I'm just trying to stir up some stories of what it's like to be you working in a distributorship.

Sales Rep XX:
First boss, I think was a hard boss to work for.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah. I was in the office. So first day in the office, he's very intimidating. And then one chair just put a little. What I did in the office, you I was a hard job taking care of sick sales reps.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep XX:
I mean, it's like anything they needed, setting up accounts, collecting money from those accounts. And when their sales rep called your work cell phone, you answered it and took care of what they needed.

Tracy Neal:
Okay.

Sales Rep XX:
But when you let your accounts go past, you know, 90 days of an invoice not being paid, you've got a you've got to answer to that. And I like doing things a hundred percent. So if somebody wasn't it was creeping up on my, you know, out there receivables less. So you get really, you know, a lot of anxiety. And I think that my first boss instilled that sense of urgency. And she didn't leave room for you to just be like, oh, I couldn't do it sort of thing, at least from me.

Tracy Neal:
How did working in accounts receivable provide you with valuable information about the importance of cash flow for the business and the importance of revenue? And because I've never worked in accounts receivable and I can imagine being there, that it really makes sense when you see the numbers on the invoice.

Sales Rep XX:
A lot of money in beer, wine, spirits.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep XX:
There's a lot of money and people don't pay you. We joke. In a wholesaler. You know, the drivers will joke. Or if there wasn't me, who is going to deliver it? The sales are up so well. If there was a me, I was gonna sell it in the A&R girls joke. Well, there wasn't us. How is the bill getting paid? That's it. So mean chicken or the egg, you know?

Tracy Neal:
Yeah, definitely. What do you think of the beer industry right now in terms of females?

Sales Rep XX:
I think it's growing. I mean.

Tracy Neal:
You bet you it's for somebody your age. There's not been many females in the industry for 13 years at age 30. So you've seen a lot of changes over the last 13 years. What do you think the opportunity is or where you've seen examples of some great opportunity for women in this industry?

Sales Rep XX:
I see it growing, which is so positive. And I think that it's become more of a whether it's a wholesaler brewery being more open to women, being in the business. But I think it's we still have a long road ahead of us to pave the way. And we're not just women in the beer business. We bring in the added value or we're just as in line with these guys that have been the good old boys in the beer business. I think there's a huge I don't think we're looked at equally. I hate to, like say it like that, but I think there's a definite that's obvious. There's more man right now. But yeah, I think that it's I'm so optimistic about it because you see all these women getting what I started at the wholesaler. It was the office where women. And when I you know, towards the end of the career, there's more women, more and more and more. And I'm at the office. So it's great. You see the role. You know, everybody being a part of everything.

Tracy Neal:
Here's an interesting question that I asked sales rep X and I was just bewildered by his answer. But at age 30, are you making the kind of money that you thought you'd make five years ago?

Sales Rep XX:
No.

Tracy Neal:
No. How come? Well, maybe not. How come? But more, more or less?

Sales Rep XX:
I think that five years ago I thought I'd be making so much more. But I put up my bar up really high. I have my . Yeah. I think that I thought I'd be making more. I see. I see a bright road to my future outside. Very excited.

Tracy Neal:
Well, in a little bit of sage wisdom from an old guy. It's not what you make. It's what you keep. It's what you keep. So. Okay.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
But when you were a sales rep, did you think that the. And I'm not really trying to pry on a particular distributor, but in general, was the compensation fair? Did it meet your needs at that time in your life? Was it plentiful? Was it a struggle to get a feel for what sales rep.

Sales Rep XX:
Probably met my needs. I mean, if you think about it. I was when I was a rep, I didn't have, I have a daughter now and a husband and a house and two dogs. One of special needs.

Tracy Neal:
So you have liabilities.

Sales Rep XX:
More expenses but when you know, I think that once I got into sales and crossed that that line there, I I had enough to make ends meet. Plus some I think, you know, going out to buyers in with your friends and racking up a bar tab, I think that's what I needed.

Tracy Neal:
And that's good to hear for the. Right. I mean, I guess I'm not trying to pry into particular discernment and as a whole for the industry. That's where we want people in this industry to feel that they can meet their needs from a income standpoint. Still have fun. Still get a little savings in there and not get into too much debt.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. What was one of the things that you learned the most that you thought was the most impactful in your career that you learned while working at distributorship?

Sales Rep XX:
We sell, too. I mean, I saw that everybody like you, you're always selling you're selling yourself. You're selling a brand. You're selling the people.

Tracy Neal:
Tell me about selling yourself.

Sales Rep XX:
Selling yourself. Just, you know, that first time you meet somebody, you meet in Macao.

Tracy Neal:
First impression.

Sales Rep XX:
That first impression you're selling yourself. And there might be a Latin promo the night before you set up to sell yourself with a new account and whatever the task is that day, that feeling 100 percent. You can't walk in like a slog to sell yourself, be bubbly, happy or whatever your selling skill is. I guess sell yourself. You have to sell. You know, I couldn't work at my distributor and feel really disgruntled about my distributor yet to be proud of where you come from.

Tracy Neal:
Are you proud of the distributor you worked for?

Sales Rep XX:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
That's good.

Sales Rep XX:
I cried a lot.

Tracy Neal:
You cried a lot.

Sales Rep XX:
When I put in my.

Tracy Neal:
When you put in your notice.

Sales Rep XX:
Five weeks.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah. But no, I think the thing that I learned learned the most would be not to sell myself short. Because I think for a long time out of 13 years, I think the last three, four years was when I really gained my confidence to be able to look for opportunities and to really listen to people that were giving me athletes and talent. Because people don't tell you you do a good job like they do. There's not a lot of pats on the back and the distributor world.

Tracy Neal:
There's a very poor. What would you call it, a feedback loop?

Sales Rep XX:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
Very poor feedback loop. And feedback isn't always positive, but one of the keys is, you know, the iterations of feedback giving more, more and more and more feedback on a regular basis.

Sales Rep XX:
Absolutely. So I think you've got to own you've got to now not sell yourself short. And that's one of the blame.

Tracy Neal:
What do you mean by sell yourself short?

Sales Rep XX:
Know that you're confident you can do things and that you are a boss at this. You know, like maybe e-mails is your thing. Like own that thing, that's your shit. Like go do it or really be confident in what you know. You do know what you're good at.

Tracy Neal:
So what are you what are, Jewels? What are you kick ass at? What do you really good at? What's that one thing that you're confident about?

Sales Rep XX:
Meeting. Meeting people, meeting people.

Tracy Neal:
Meeting people.

Sales Rep XX:
First impressions talking to people. I wouldn't put myself. Reached out to you, but I didn't think I could talk to a stranger.

Tracy Neal:
You were great. I got you in my favorites on my phone.

Sales Rep XX:
There we go.

Tracy Neal:
Yes. Because we had a couple of good conversations before meeting in person.

Sales Rep XX:
I'm in one of your favorites? You like me, like, oh, my God.

Tracy Neal:
Well, because we were talking a lot. We were talking a lot over the last 30 days, setting this appointment up. And I want to get to know you a little bit more. And I was so honored that you reached out and said, I'd really like to be on the podcast. You haven't had a woman on there yet. I'm the sales rep. I'm a millennial. I want to speak on behalf of the women out there?

Sales Rep XX:
I'm selling myself.

Tracy Neal:
Yes, you are absolutely selling yourself. So what would you say to other female sales reps who are out there right now? Let's take away the gender, because it's really not that important for the question. The question is, how would you encourage other sales reps out there that are maybe in their first week or their first year? What are some of the key things that you learned being a sales rep before you were the S.E.C.?

Sales Rep XX:
When I did my speech, so to say I was like, I didn't have a speech in writing a speech, but I'm going to say something. I said to my team, and this is what I would say that.

Tracy Neal:
You're telling me about your departure speech. When you leave your noticed.

Sales Rep XX:
Speech.

Tracy Neal:
When you gave your notice, right? You handed it in.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah. And everybody in you know, the company is awesome. And to that sales reps in the car listening like you didn't just stumble upon. You want to be in this business. Hopefully you're in this business because you want to be and you enjoy it. And I think I know that it might take a while, but everybody has something in them that's a fire and a passion. And sometimes it takes a little bit to dig it up. But as soon as you do, like, it gives me goose bumps. You're going to be also like everybody's a selling superstar. I forgot where I heard that. Everybody has a salary scale because I'm a big podcast girl. I it out. Put it. Put it in the notes. They're selling super SuperScale, whether it's me being bubbly and laughing. And, you know, I kind of grab a man and talk, talk, talk. Yeah. And that's my selling SuperScale that all of a sudden I drop some hints about the beer and pushing or whatever. And all of a sudden maybe sell other people data. That's their selling SuperScale. So everybody.

Tracy Neal:
Data and analytics, incites.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah. So if you have that, you just have to uncover and then hone in on it and you'll be a rock star. And this job, it just this industry. We'll always keep coming back to you as you as you keep giving it up.

Tracy Neal:
I'm going to ask a question that sounds a little bit selfish, but it's not for me, but it's for the other listeners who have maybe this is their first episode they're tuning into what did the podcast do for you? The iSellBeer podcast. What did that do for you and how did you find it?

Sales Rep XX:
How did I found it by I started getting into podcasts that millennials and I worked with. You're listening to podcasts not even related to be air, but our caller daddy podcast. And then I was like that opened up the door to podcasts. And I mean, being in the timeframe, looking to, you know, kind of brought in my horizon on the business and fine tune my knowledge. I think I dig in more. I just typed in beer. Okay. Yeah. And I listened. And then I was like itchin for the next one year. A big break there for a while.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah, I had a break.

Sales Rep XX:
And I was like, well, it's done. And I found it. But I.

Tracy Neal:
It's hard to do.

Sales Rep XX:
I can only imagine.

Tracy Neal:
Because I kind of I kind of have this rule that I like to do them in person. I only did one by phone and I don't think I did that guest the justice that he deserved when I did it by phone. It wasn't his fault, but it just it was hard because the body language isn't there and we're talking over each other and it wasn't the best. I wish I wouldn't have done it that way. So I've kind of made my own little rule that, you know what, I'm only going to do these in person.

Sales Rep XX:
I think you said, yeah.

Tracy Neal:
I agree. But here's the challenge. I live in Northern California, and I also am very sensitive to the fact that I don't want to have just all West Coast people either. You know, I want to go all over the country. Yeah. So, you know, last week I was in Connecticut, New York and Atlanta. Right. This week, I'm blahblahblah and blahblahblah. I'm going to keep him quiet so that I'll get our destination on where we're at. super-secret. But anyway, I'm in three different cities this week. Right. And so and that's how our software business runs is that, you know, I go in spurts where I do fly around the country, you know, probably 20 to 25 flights a year. So it affords me the ability to do that. And with the conferences, I think I'll do a better job and go into next year and keeping it every two weeks.

Sales Rep XX:
And if you get people like me that just say, please, please. Wait list.

Tracy Neal:
So what what tell me about when you first listened to the podcast. Did you happen to listen to episode triple 0 synopsis on the triple-digit episode? Triple zero is just me talking for six minutes and here's what to expect on the podcast. Okay.

Sales Rep XX:
That doesn't sound too good.

Tracy Neal:
I'm just curious because episode triple zero has about half of the downloads as the rest of the episodes. And so I would tell people, listen, the episode triple 0 is me telling you what the podcast is going to be about. But I think a lot of people skip over it. And then I hate for them to make a quick judgment on just one episode. But what did you think when you started hearing other people who are some memorable guests? And did you have that epiphany of like, holy cow. I'm not the only one sitting in a car today doing this. They called setting the world becomes big.

Sales Rep XX:
There was one I don't remember was sales rep x talking about incentives and kind of like the follow up on it as SEC. That was a lot of you launch some incentive but the follow up, keep on dating the guys. I was like, ha ha. Like, really?

Tracy Neal:
That resonated with you?

Sales Rep XX:
Check myself quick like, am I think, you know, it's time to spread like it does in the beer industry. And I maybe missed something. I really like the recent ones with the successors.

Tracy Neal:
The next gen.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah. The next gen.

Tracy Neal:
The next gen, yes.

Sales Rep XX:
That was very interesting.

Tracy Neal:
The sons and daughters, I think only had sons, though, but you see sons and daughters of a beer distributor, owners of the next gen conference. Yeah.

Sales Rep XX:
I have a lead for a daughter.

Tracy Neal:
I'm happy to do it. You know, it's it's not the lady's fault that they didn't get interviewed. But the way that that worked was when I was at the next gen conference. It was kind of like, here's Tracy, go talk to him, you know, and sit in. My shtick was walking around the event going, would you like to go up to my hotel room and record a podcast, you know? And I got four guys that said, yes. So we went up and did it. I would imagine a year from now when I'm a little bit more well-known and get a little more exposure to the next gen than I'll have a little bit more success. Some of the daughters of distributor owners up there for some really good conversations as well. Sure. Good. What about being in FCC? I mean, you've been in FEC for how many years?

Sales Rep XX:
Almost six.

Tracy Neal:
Almost six years. Okay. So I'm going to call you a veteran, then. A six year FEC, I would imagine, aren't a lot of six year as SECs across the country. Any tips or tricks or hacks on how to do that job? Well, at an Anheuser-Busch distributorship.

Sales Rep XX:
Be organized.

Tracy Neal:
Okay, what's that mean? Defined that.

Sales Rep XX:
Super organize. Reminders. Outlook calendar was my friend and Outlook in general, but reminders on one you're updating when two deadlines are there's a sales rep incentive that is we're on and you really want to stay on top of updating sales numbers, goals, and you really want to also give yourself enough time to create the next month and set of targets and allow time to have the team leaders review it. Sometimes there isn't time to do everything, but if you just, you know, don't. If you just missed deadlines and reminders here, you're underwater.

Tracy Neal:
If only there was a software platform that tracked all this execution and rolled it all up instantly on mobile devices in time.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
That's my older speech by the way.

Sales Rep XX:
So I was a huge advocate for sure. I still really am.

Tracy Neal:
Thank you. Yes, you are a huge advocate, ambassador of the software.

Sales Rep XX:
I am.

Tracy Neal:
So other than that. Any other tips or hacks for SECs?

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah, you want to be stern but also have the sales reps be your friend? But I think the FEC has a great opportunity to give a pat on the back that is lacking sometimes. And it's very easy to say, hey, you're doing this right. You didn't survive, so you didn't execute that, but then followed up or maybe start with you. Did this really well, but this is lacking.

Tracy Neal:
Two positives and negatives.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
I would imagine that you learned. I don't know if you are aware of this, but I would imagine you learned a lot about informal power because in FEC doesn't directly have anyone reporting to them.

Sales Rep XX:
Right.

Tracy Neal:
You're dotted line influencer.

Sales Rep XX:
It's crazy.

Tracy Neal:
And that I don't know, that's really valuable experience. Six years of being a having informal power because there's all these studies and not only business, but also in governments, you know, in countries and states around the world, stuff like that about formal power versus informal power. Right. And the formal power has the title and the crown and the informal power is sometimes the person off to the side who's actually calling the shots.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah. My director of sales.

Tracy Neal:
We call that my wife. Well.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah, everyone's wife. There's my plug to everybody's wife.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah, inform of our.

Sales Rep XX:
Director of sales. He would always, always introduce me and sometimes I'd roll my eyes as his left hand. His right hand. Yeah. Everything in it is important. I think a lot of especially new higher sales reps are first starting. They look at the FEC rule, as you know, this this person's the boss.

Tracy Neal:
They're not together. Right. The FEC got together and they got their pulse on everything going on.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah, but, you know, you're not you're not in the same level.

Tracy Neal:
The FEC doesn't necessarily develop strategy. They more track the results of strategy. Right.

Sales Rep XX:
I would say they develop sometimes a program to tailor it more to our market and then feed it to the right people. Okay. So if there's a national program correlating it to your market. Okay. Identifying where we can execute our execution.

Tracy Neal:
All right. Jules, is there anything different about being a woman in the industry versus a woman in another industry? Do you think.

Sales Rep XX:
For sure?

Tracy Neal:
For sure you didn't you didn't hesitate.

Sales Rep XX:
No.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. You didn't hesitate to talk to me?

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah. I feel like I can go on a tangent or reel me in. But yes there's a difference. I think. Woman in the beer industry. Wait, what do you do? You sell beer? Yeah, but they.

Tracy Neal:
So do women say that as much as men? Your girl friends?

Sales Rep XX:
I think women are more confused and the kinds of the men are.

Tracy Neal:
Okay. Yeah. Because I was going to say I heard that a woman sells beer. I'm like, okay, cool.

Sales Rep XX:
You're awesome in industry.

Tracy Neal:
I've met a lot of women in the industry, too.

Sales Rep XX:
I think immediately, like, for instance, my grandmother's when I started at 17 and it was a beer company. This is bringing back a story. But it was my 20th birthday or 21st birthday or something. And I said we were at a big, long table at a restaurant and they said shit like twice. And my grandmother looked down at the table and said, Jules. Ever since you worked for that beer company and swearing, we didn't have to talk like that. You know, I couldn't wait to go in the office and tell everybody she said that. Look at a terrible influence. My grandmas, as I just swear now, I'm a trucker myself because I work for these beer people. But I think that women or people, a lot of people that, you know, you work for beer, you sell beer, they just think of the tiny girl on the bud dress that's passing sample.

Tracy Neal:
There are three girls in the Budweiser.

Sales Rep XX:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
On the boat, by the way, going to reference the more the greatest posters of all time. Let's be accurate. There were three girls in Bud Swimsuits on the.

Sales Rep XX:
Nobody's forgotten.

Tracy Neal:
On the bow of a boat. Darn good looking boat too.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah, but that's a baby cub.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep XX:
There's nothing wrong with that. Very valuable, important part of it.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. I think I've told this story before too. But I remember in my in my 20s when I was working and I was I had gone and done my master's degree in business and I was very proud of that. And in working at the brewery, sometimes I would go to barbecues and people would ask me, it's all you work for a beer company, you know? Do you drive a truck? Now, first, let me say driving a truck is one the most important jobs in this industry. Sure. Right. But at the time, having just spent one hundred thousand dollars on a master's degree in business, I didn't see that as a compliment. And it used to make me really mad. But then after a few years, I started saying, yep, I drive a truck because I just I I my skin was thick enough. It didn't bother me.

Sales Rep XX:
And you probably knew more.

Tracy Neal:
And I knew and I understood the job a lot more, accepted it, respected it. And it just wasn't a battle I wanted to fight anymore. I was like, yeah, I do that. And it's great, really important part of the industry. And I would go into that pseudo role of acting like that was my job with it. No matter what they ask me, what do you do? I'd usually say yes, because it just didn't feel like diving into explaining. The three tier system at another friend's barbecue is a boring, but it's it's it can be exhausting.

Sales Rep XX:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
For people who don't understand it.

Sales Rep XX:
Or don't want to. Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Or don't want to.

Sales Rep XX:
So yeah, I think that there's there's some double standards out there a little bit. I mean I really wonder.

Tracy Neal:
What are some of the double standards?

Sales Rep XX:
I have a really wonderful husband that understand.

Tracy Neal:
By the way we have a jackhammer.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
Down in the bar now.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
We pick the loudest bar in America for this interview with the jackhammer and a hole in our Christmas party downstairs. We have a wonderful husband which is wonderful. I was gonna ask his name, but I can't ask his name. Ray. Well, I don't want to know his real name. What's his middle name? Ray. Okay. It's all right. That's good. Yeah.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah, it's wonderful. And you know, there's that shit. I just found out that it'd be really great if a few people went to this promo after work to show faith. And you know, I've already maybe. But in the office crunching numbers are putting together a report till six. Yeah. And now it's seven. And he's got to put baby the bad and you know.

Tracy Neal:
How old is your baby girl, by the way?

Sales Rep XX:
Two just turned two.

Tracy Neal:
Two. Tell me about me. Tell me about being your mom.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah. This is all. Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
It's all part of your life. Right.

Sales Rep XX:
Part of this whole thing is that I lived single ish right. Like not married woman in the beer business and I married my mom.

Tracy Neal:
Four different lifestyles.

Sales Rep XX:
For sure.

Tracy Neal:
The same career.

Sales Rep XX:
And being okay. So backing up just to, you know, that impromptu. I'm gonna be home at 7:30 and everybody knows. Listen. You're leaving the bar at 7:30 and you're honoring and you're like in traffic. Yeah, that one, you know. Joe, it's like, oh, get out of my way. Yeah, I think it was Tim Allen. I just watch it. It's like no one has a bunch of traffic and he's a saint because he gets it. But there's also every spouse, I think has that frustration where it's like it's not like you're working. You're having a great time drinking beer with your friends. Yeah. It's like, no, because maybe I did want to just go home. Yeah, I understand these. Amazing when I do that, hey, I didn't have a beer. You know, get a water and just talk with everybody. So it's definitely you know, I think it's easier in a way for a man to do that because maybe there's a people out there like, you know, my grandmother was like, well, that time with your daughter, though, it's equal to every day. You know, if Ray had a work meeting after work and I the baby to bed. Would anybody ever say, well, he needs to be home to put. You know, so I dunno, standard. They're kind of and it definitely changed.

Tracy Neal:
I heard a great double standards in the news this week. They talked about intermittent fasting. They said if women did this, it'd be called an eating disorder. But men do it. And all of a sudden intermittent fasting like this super dude cool diet that men are allowed to do. It's also good. That's a great example of a true double standard.

Sales Rep XX:
Absolutely. Absolutely. And I don't think. Yeah. It's just. And being a mom like I'm one of the things when I get pregnant is like, how am I get a St. Patrick State was leading into the time frame where that might be hard to hide if I'm going to say I'm pregnant or not pregnant right now because I'm St. Patrick's Day. Go. You know.

Tracy Neal:
That's an interesting that's an interesting concept you just brought up because I mean, obviously, with all the labor laws and everything, you know, pregnant women are completely protected. Right. It's an absolute protected event from a legal standpoint. But on the other hand, you clearly thought about it. You're like, hey, I'm I'm supposed to go to St. Patrick's Day promos and sometimes big bumped mom. Does it really go off very well, pulling off all the St. Patrick's Day? How did your distributor handle that when you when you told them.

Sales Rep XX:
My direotr of sales was just like great.

Tracy Neal:
So very supportive.

Sales Rep XX:
Yes, supportive.

Tracy Neal:
That's good.

Sales Rep XX:
I think that it's one of those things where, oh, my God. Time went by on how it nine months come already and then you're putting together your backfill and leaving, taking that time to be with your baby and the fear of things like getting cut.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep XX:
Which I always have, you know, always. But it it was like I was the first maybe the second woman. I think first recently to be pregnant in that wholesaler. So with some of the new laws with that, because the woman before me, the laws were the same.

Tracy Neal:
Ten or 20 years ago the laws were different?

Sales Rep XX:
20 years ago. You didn't need a breast pump room. You didn't need a nursing room. Yeah. You know, you.

Tracy Neal:
But they afforded those things.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
That's awesome.

Sales Rep XX:
You know, that you need to have that space, a private space for new mothers mothers to be able to do that. Or taking, you know, some time to be with your baby. If I didn't emergency C-section. So I added a couple weeks, you know, before maybe 20 years ago, that wasn't the thing. Yes. Get back to work. So I think that it was scary for me. And I had a lot of anxiety about it. And how was I going to balance this whole new world with this world? The beer business is my world. And now we've got a baby who's also going to share that world.

Tracy Neal:
Do you have any regrets or bad experiences in that time or did everything work out OK?

Sales Rep XX:
I don't know. I cried a lot. My first trimester is very hard for me to kind of understand, like how this would all work because.

Tracy Neal:
You were probably ecstatic to be pregnant.

Sales Rep XX:
Absolute.

Tracy Neal:
Right. As a young woman, as a wife, you're like, heck, yeah, having a family. This is awesome. But then you have to navigate that other side, a line where you were thinking about yourself as a professional and you you just said you cried a lot.

Sales Rep XX:
And bringing in these topics that weren't comfortable to talk about.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep XX:
Are you guys prepared if something happens and I'm going to be gone six weeks longer. Will you guys band maybe me working for 10 hours or, you know, working from home a day like us trying to think of options to make everything a work life balance and a wholesaler, that this is only happened in 20 years and that person didn't need it. You know, and we have to think about everybody else after you is going to have a baby. We can't. This is a whole new world. And I was the test bunny, so to say. So for me, that put a lot of pressure and anxiety on me to pave the way. So you say stress and anxiety is it was really hard. And I said, I'm not going to sugarcoat it was hard.

Tracy Neal:
As physical ramifications that too, right. I mean, stress, anxiety, add to not only the physical ramifications of being pregnant, but just the emotional stress. Right. Probably not the most sound nights of sleep that you've ever had.

Sales Rep XX:
I cried on the way into work on my way home. I'm sorry. It was stressful. Which I don't. I think my emotion, you know, my hormones didn't help.

Tracy Neal:
And if I hear you correctly, you're saying that your distributor handled it really well.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah.

Tracy Neal:
And did all the right things and was very.

Sales Rep XX:
Get it handled it as fast as they could. And they were very open and listening to me for sure.

Tracy Neal:
That's great.

Sales Rep XX:
You know, to help. We were in this together.

Tracy Neal:
That's good. So if you were sitting across the table from 200 distributor owners who were probably baby-boomers and every one of them has one to two to three female sales reps that are all in their low 20s.

Sales Rep XX:
One to two to three.

Tracy Neal:
Yet to be. Well, I'm picking a really realistic number. I've been around the country. I don't see one or more than three. But let's pretend they're you again. You've got 200 boomer owners across the table from you. They all have between 1 and 3 20 somethings that are yet to have babies. But let's just assume that they all keep their jobs for the next 10 years and there's going to be not one maybe, but sometimes two and even sometimes three babies through the career of this valuable soldier. What's your advice to those owners?

Sales Rep XX:
Listen.

Tracy Neal:
Listen to him.

Sales Rep XX:
Listen to him. Look at other companies that have found ways to make this all work together in a matter where I think it only helps you grow and uncover new ideas and have a better culture in your company. Things don't need to say the same in the beer business. There sure is that thing. This idea.. So you might as well listen and really come together on what will work for you seller for share.

Tracy Neal:
I wonder if the jackhammer guy could jackhammer any louder. You're probably not going.

Sales Rep XX:
To get it done in there.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah, we probably get to the full hour here. I'm going to wrap it up and say any closing comments. Jewels, our Sales Rep XX, right? Female comes on the first female unidentified sales rep for Sales Rep X. Any closing comments on just the industry itself? We were excited and congratulate you on your job with the supplier. I mean, distributors are going to be covering.

Sales Rep XX:
About 6.

Tracy Neal:
6 distributors you'll be calling on. So now you're going to a different level. You know, you're excited about. I can see the excitement in your face.

Sales Rep XX:
I'm excited. I feel like I know I know the inner workings well, end up well.

Tracy Neal:
And it's so great that one of your six distributors is sure you used to work for.

Sales Rep XX:
Yes.

Tracy Neal:
Right. And you will learn other things about how they all do things different. Some of them do things different because of their leadership. Others do things different because of their marketplace. The market dictates that they behave differently. So that all be very interesting for you.

Sales Rep XX:
Yeah. I don't know. Closing statement. I think that you can enjoy this industry to the fullest extent. I really have a really awesome career, an amazing stories to look back on. And I think for the women out there, don't let anybody hold you back because the world's your oyster. And, you know, this is an untapped spot for women and we can tell that we can crush it. And I think that for any sales rep, you can just you can all find your super power selling skill it.

Tracy Neal:
And for the men out there. Right. Treat and respect the women in this industry as equals for sure. And have a little bit of empathy for some of the younger ones that are going through some of those challenges with the new baby or new husband and all the things that we go through life.

Sales Rep XX:
Right. Let thing called life.

Tracy Neal:
Life happens.

Sales Rep XX:
Although I love to joke with the best of them anyway.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah.

Sales Rep XX:
I'll go ahead with some of the fun. The fun jokes out there.

Tracy Neal:
Yeah. All right. Well, Jewels, it's been a pleasure. Thank you so much for reaching out to me and being on the podcast. Thanks, Francine. A bunch of great questions.

Sales Rep XX:
Thanks for meeting me halfway.

Tracy Neal:
And yeah, have a good day.

Sales Rep XX:
You too. Bye.

Tracy Neal:
Thanks. Bye bye. So what's the best tasting beer in America? Who cares? That's for the consumer to decide. And until they do, you will keep selling them new brands every day as a distributor sales rep. You can become a part of the iSellBeer Nation by subscribing to this podcast and using the #iSellBeer in all your social posts. Also, be sure to join the iSellBeer Nation Facebook Group and visit our website. Our industry is an up and down the street business where local relationships matter. I want to thank you for making me part of your day and wish you good luck on the objectives for your next account call. In fact, I know you're gonna crush it.

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